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woofiedog
02-21-2006, 10:56 PM
Found this story about the first troops finding the Do-335 Arrow at the end of the war... while checking into some info.

http://www.skylighters.org/dornier/crowd2.jpg

Link: http://www.skylighters.org/dornier/index.html

The Do335 "Arrow" at Unter Biberg

When the men of the 225th AAA Searchlight Battalion arrived at the former Luftwaffe airdrome at Unter Biberg (Advance Landing Ground R-85) just south of Munich on May 7, 1945, the war was all but over. Less than 24 hours later, they €" along with the rest of the world €" would be celebrating V-E Day (Victory in Europe). As members of an occupying army, and before passes to nearby Munich were issued, they had little to do but explore the large airfield, which was to become their home until the end of the year (nick-named "Camp Rattle" for a reason no one seems to recall). In late April and early May, German pilots from scores of Luftwaffe squadrons began flying into Unter Biberg to surrender to the Allies. As a result, most of the field was covered with aircraft of all types, most out of fuel or stripped for parts. Many had flown a long way from overrun air bases in the East. There were mostly Fw190s, Me109s, and Me110s, but there were a few rarities, including several Me262 jet-powered fighter-bombers hidden in the nearby woods. It didn't take the more curious Skylighters long to discover a strange-looking airplane that to many of them must have seemed right out of a Saturday afternoon serial. It had two propellers, one in the nose of the plane and the other in the tail! Surely, Jules Verne or Edgar Rice Burroughs had thought that one up! Could the front and the back halves of the craft separate and fly off in different directions, one pushing and one pulling?

http://www.skylighters.org/photos/longobardi/longo54.jpg

The plane turned out to be a Dornier Do335 "Pfeil" ("Arrow"). History itself has proven that no one could accuse WW II German aircraft designers of conservatism and, while the majority of combat aircraft were of traditional design, there were several which pushed the leading edge of aeronautics. One of the most famous of the bizarre shapes which took to the air over Germany was the Dornier Do335, a brave attempt to provide the Luftwaffe with a potent fighter-bomber, night-fighter, and reconnaissance platform. Claudius Dornier of Dornier-Werke GmbH had long been interested in the field of centerline thrust, whereby two engines shared the same thrust line (one pulling and one pushing). Benefits of this system were obvious over a conventional twin layout, with only the same frontal area as a single-engined aircraft, the wing left clean of engine nacelles and attendant structures, and no asymmetric pull if one engine cut out. The unconventional tandem engine layout was patented by Claudius Dornier in 1937, and after seven years of development, the first test models began appearing at Luftwaffe bases at about the same time the young men of the 225th were hunkering down in their tents at USAAF airstrips just behind the West Wall, hoping for a end to hostilities by Christmas.

woofiedog
02-21-2006, 10:56 PM
Found this story about the first troops finding the Do-335 Arrow at the end of the war... while checking into some info.

http://www.skylighters.org/dornier/crowd2.jpg

Link: http://www.skylighters.org/dornier/index.html

The Do335 "Arrow" at Unter Biberg

When the men of the 225th AAA Searchlight Battalion arrived at the former Luftwaffe airdrome at Unter Biberg (Advance Landing Ground R-85) just south of Munich on May 7, 1945, the war was all but over. Less than 24 hours later, they €" along with the rest of the world €" would be celebrating V-E Day (Victory in Europe). As members of an occupying army, and before passes to nearby Munich were issued, they had little to do but explore the large airfield, which was to become their home until the end of the year (nick-named "Camp Rattle" for a reason no one seems to recall). In late April and early May, German pilots from scores of Luftwaffe squadrons began flying into Unter Biberg to surrender to the Allies. As a result, most of the field was covered with aircraft of all types, most out of fuel or stripped for parts. Many had flown a long way from overrun air bases in the East. There were mostly Fw190s, Me109s, and Me110s, but there were a few rarities, including several Me262 jet-powered fighter-bombers hidden in the nearby woods. It didn't take the more curious Skylighters long to discover a strange-looking airplane that to many of them must have seemed right out of a Saturday afternoon serial. It had two propellers, one in the nose of the plane and the other in the tail! Surely, Jules Verne or Edgar Rice Burroughs had thought that one up! Could the front and the back halves of the craft separate and fly off in different directions, one pushing and one pulling?

http://www.skylighters.org/photos/longobardi/longo54.jpg

The plane turned out to be a Dornier Do335 "Pfeil" ("Arrow"). History itself has proven that no one could accuse WW II German aircraft designers of conservatism and, while the majority of combat aircraft were of traditional design, there were several which pushed the leading edge of aeronautics. One of the most famous of the bizarre shapes which took to the air over Germany was the Dornier Do335, a brave attempt to provide the Luftwaffe with a potent fighter-bomber, night-fighter, and reconnaissance platform. Claudius Dornier of Dornier-Werke GmbH had long been interested in the field of centerline thrust, whereby two engines shared the same thrust line (one pulling and one pushing). Benefits of this system were obvious over a conventional twin layout, with only the same frontal area as a single-engined aircraft, the wing left clean of engine nacelles and attendant structures, and no asymmetric pull if one engine cut out. The unconventional tandem engine layout was patented by Claudius Dornier in 1937, and after seven years of development, the first test models began appearing at Luftwaffe bases at about the same time the young men of the 225th were hunkering down in their tents at USAAF airstrips just behind the West Wall, hoping for a end to hostilities by Christmas.

Hristo_
02-22-2006, 12:17 AM
Nice story of a cool plane. Too bad it is getting rapidly exticnt from DF servers (while La-7 3B-20 still stays http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif).

Hawgdog
02-22-2006, 08:47 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Hristo_:
Nice story of a cool plane. Too bad it is getting rapidly exticnt from DF servers (while La-7 3B-20 still stays http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif). </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

No fooling...Sad but too many servers claim to be historical, yet more like histerical...

HayateAce
02-22-2006, 03:33 PM
The first time I saw a DoDo online...I shot it down.