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Pirschjaeger
04-21-2007, 08:14 PM
Hi All,

I thought it might be useful if I wrote a simple step by step instruction for anyone wanting to try Linux, but have never had the courage. Like 90% of the GD community I am a complete Linux noob, so I will write this assuming you are like me. I wanted to get this written down before I am totally transformed into a geek and then unable to communicate effectively with noobs. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

If Bazzaah hadn't assisted me I wouldn't be using Linux now. He can still speak noob but I sense the force is strong and he want be one of us much longer.http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/sadeyes.gif

The old Linux stereotypes don't match the Linux reality today. In the past I had tried it a few times and could never get passed installation. It seems to me that Linux has become much easier to use now. Actually, it is easier than a fresh reinstall of XP. I have been using Ubuntu for less than a week now.

I'm using Ubuntu 6.10 AMD64. I've found both the 64 and 386 versions work best so I'll base these steps on what I've done. I recommend using a separate HDD for this, just in case. I will post this in various steps since I am required to actually work sometimes.

Firstly, download Ubuntu from here (http://www.ubuntu.com/getubuntu/download) and burn it to cd. If you simply click "download" without changing the default selections you'll start downloading 7.04. This should do fine.

Getting Familiar

You can actually use Ubuntu without really installing it. This is great if you want to play with Ubuntu for familiarization. It's also very easy and safe.

1) In BIOS, set your boot sequence to CDRom and boot your pc from the Ubuntu cd.

2) A screen will appear with options. The first option, "install", will be highlighted. Choose this. It will only install virtually and will not affect any other files you might have on your HDD.

3) Within 10 minutes you'll see your screen change color, to a light brown. The Ubuntu desktop will not immediately appear complete. Bit by bit, piece bye piece, your desk top will be filled in. If you see a warning screen mentioning something about "Gnome" not being available don't worry, just click ok. On my pc the desktop loaded in about 1 minute. Your pc may take a little longer, depending on the hardware.

Now your desktop will look exactly like an installed Linux and it even works. You can browse through a few buttons and use some of the programs. On my pc I was automatically connected to the net since I was using a router.

You'll notice an icon on the desktop that says "install". DO NOT click this unless you are ready for the real install. If you are not ready to install linux simply remove the cd from the tray and reboot. Don't forget to reset your boot sequence in BIOS. You computer will start up as normal and your Windows won't even remember being possessed by the Linux spirit.

My next post will be about the real installation including an easy step by step installation/update/automatix2 guide, complete with links.

Pirschjaeger
04-21-2007, 08:14 PM
Hi All,

I thought it might be useful if I wrote a simple step by step instruction for anyone wanting to try Linux, but have never had the courage. Like 90% of the GD community I am a complete Linux noob, so I will write this assuming you are like me. I wanted to get this written down before I am totally transformed into a geek and then unable to communicate effectively with noobs. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

If Bazzaah hadn't assisted me I wouldn't be using Linux now. He can still speak noob but I sense the force is strong and he want be one of us much longer.http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/sadeyes.gif

The old Linux stereotypes don't match the Linux reality today. In the past I had tried it a few times and could never get passed installation. It seems to me that Linux has become much easier to use now. Actually, it is easier than a fresh reinstall of XP. I have been using Ubuntu for less than a week now.

I'm using Ubuntu 6.10 AMD64. I've found both the 64 and 386 versions work best so I'll base these steps on what I've done. I recommend using a separate HDD for this, just in case. I will post this in various steps since I am required to actually work sometimes.

Firstly, download Ubuntu from here (http://www.ubuntu.com/getubuntu/download) and burn it to cd. If you simply click "download" without changing the default selections you'll start downloading 7.04. This should do fine.

Getting Familiar

You can actually use Ubuntu without really installing it. This is great if you want to play with Ubuntu for familiarization. It's also very easy and safe.

1) In BIOS, set your boot sequence to CDRom and boot your pc from the Ubuntu cd.

2) A screen will appear with options. The first option, "install", will be highlighted. Choose this. It will only install virtually and will not affect any other files you might have on your HDD.

3) Within 10 minutes you'll see your screen change color, to a light brown. The Ubuntu desktop will not immediately appear complete. Bit by bit, piece bye piece, your desk top will be filled in. If you see a warning screen mentioning something about "Gnome" not being available don't worry, just click ok. On my pc the desktop loaded in about 1 minute. Your pc may take a little longer, depending on the hardware.

Now your desktop will look exactly like an installed Linux and it even works. You can browse through a few buttons and use some of the programs. On my pc I was automatically connected to the net since I was using a router.

You'll notice an icon on the desktop that says "install". DO NOT click this unless you are ready for the real install. If you are not ready to install linux simply remove the cd from the tray and reboot. Don't forget to reset your boot sequence in BIOS. You computer will start up as normal and your Windows won't even remember being possessed by the Linux spirit.

My next post will be about the real installation including an easy step by step installation/update/automatix2 guide, complete with links.

WTE_Ibis
04-22-2007, 06:16 AM
Thanks Pirsch, this may give me the courage to try it.
Cheers m8.

.

slipBall
04-22-2007, 06:22 AM
Yes thanks, I will follow along....maybe someday I will be able to kick the Gate's money grab habit for good http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/mockface.gif

WWSensei
04-22-2007, 01:43 PM
Well, gave Ubuntu a whirl on an older PC. Installs great but woe unto you if you try and get it running over wireless. I've tried about 6 different "sure fire ways to get it to work" and none of them have. They are going to have to solve the problem with wireless before they will get far. If the solution requires "ndiswrapper" and downloading 10 different sets of hacked drivers to work they are not going to convince many.

I'm a Unix bigot and I've given up after a whole day spent trying to configure the thing to work with my wireless card.

Pirschjaeger
04-23-2007, 03:11 AM
Hi Sensei,

why not just use NDISWrapper? Here's the description;

"A driver wrapper that allows you to use Windows drivers for network cards"

I'm no expert, but wouldn't that work?

Have you installed Automatix2? Once you've installed this the NDISWrapper is listed in "drivers". Maybe one of the experts will tell us if this is wrong or right.

I'm sure the answer is in here (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/)

Pirschjaeger
04-26-2007, 05:14 AM
U-bump-tu

tHeBaLrOgRoCkS
04-26-2007, 04:59 PM
Some of you may wish to check out Mandriva also, its the current flavour of linux I am using and it seems pretty freindly. Not tried a wireless version but admitedly wirless does seem to be one of the weaker spots as far as linux is concerned.

One Caveat though, don't get to carried away with the hop from Windoze to Lumix as things can quite redily goe pear shaped with the later and are a little harder (but more fun) to crawl back from.

I have busted my lumix installs many many times but each time is a new adventure.

Best c0ck up with lumix for me this time around has been buggering KDE windows so that they have none of the minimize and window bars http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

A dual boot machine (as I have currently) is (I find) quite useful.

I still do all my email and vital computing from the relative familiarity of windows but will fully migrate once I am more profeciant at fixing mistakes.

short version of the above is

Make sure you have busted and restored linux a good few times before you become a total convert. And it will be some time before you stop playing games on a windoze platform.

Unless your a mame addict http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Pirschjaeger
05-11-2007, 08:58 AM
Hi all,

has anyone tried this yet? I'm to the point that I have no need for Windows anymore.

I agree totally with Balrog, get familiar before you convert.

Philipscdrw
05-11-2007, 09:24 AM
It's hard to be familiar when there's so many different varieties to choose from!

I'd get Linux when I have another HDD. Yes they're cheap but I'm cheaper.

Pirschjaeger
05-11-2007, 10:00 AM
From what I read Ubuntu 6.10 seems to be the best bet for a starter.

In the last few weeks I've been trying different versions of Linux but so far I find that Ubuntu 6.10 or 7.04 are the best. I'm sure they are the easiest and therefore the best to start with. I tried Mandriva but didn't like it much. I couldn't find "My computer" and finally gave up. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif