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Foehammer-1
02-10-2007, 07:08 PM
U-51's War Crime patrol

U-51's previous patrol resulted in 49,000 tons of British shipment being sent on a one way trip to the bottom of the North Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. The base commander at Wilhelmshaven was quite impressed. He said he

would gladly order our boat outfitted with the newest technology available to the Kriegsmarine. Unfortunately, the only example of new engineering was the KDB hydrophone,

which was installed three patrols ago. Not able to thank us (except giving out a few Iron Crosses), the base commander told us that a second boat will shadow us during the upcoming patrol. That boat will then separate and relay

any contacts to us. Fair enough, I thought. 28 days later, after the crew was well-rested, the boat scrubbed and loaded, we set sail for grid AM11. I decided to divert from a direct route a

bit, in order to sail through the main convoy lane into Britain. With luck, we would catch a passing convoy before we even hit the patrol grid. U-51 set sail out of Wilhelmshaven on February 30, 1940. This is the course I hope we would follow.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/1-3.jpg

The boat sailed along the icy waters of the North Sea, engines purring in the cold night. I figured that this was the perfect image of a wolf of the sea, silent, cunning and deadly. I tried to imagine what our boat looked like from the ocean surface. I think this would be a sight to behold,
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/2-3.jpg

All of a sudden, a bright flash ripped through the bridge and blinded all of the crew. The first officer reacted before me and yelled, "ALAAARRMM!!!!" Not sure of what he was thinking, but it looked to me like a flare from

a destroyer that passed above the conning tower. Better safe than sorry. The boat quickly took up ballast and sank to twenty meters. As we went all silent, the hydrophone operator could hear nothing on the hydrophones. As the

boat surfaced, the watch crew and I went back up the conning tower, and saw nothing. It later turned out that a photographer sneaked aboard, posing as a crewman. It was a magnesium flash that blinded us all. Since this incident could

repeat and the flash could give away our position, we promptly threw the photographer overboard. Later, the crew discovered a twenty-kilogram box full of magnesium flash hidden in the bilge under the deck plates. Since we

unloaded the twenty flare shells for the deck gun in order to have more room for HE charges, there was no way to illuminate the night sky, until now. I ordered the HE shells taken off

the casings, and a dose of magnesium flash injected into each casing. This was a decent way to spend time during a long voyage to the shipping lines.

Just north of Scapa Flow, our trailing boat separated and moved further forward. Later, a radio report came, hailing us. It turned out a merchant was heading straight for us. I plotted an intercept course and our U-51 started the chase,
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/3-3.jpg

We soon found our target, a lone coastal merchant. I ordered the deck gun crew on deck, as well as our modified shells to be loaded. The test was successful. A flash of light should be enough to provide illumination at

night, if it works during the day. It seemed that with magnesium flash the shells fly at a much higher velocity, and it only took 5 shells to down this merchant for good.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/4-3.jpg

As we sailed along, the weather changed for the worse, with winds around 14m/s and medium fog. After the night settled in, our shadowing boat radioed another contact, this one in grid AM51.

As we approached, we could barely make out a silhouette of a small merchant. I did not want to waste a torpedo on this one, so we closed in, deck gun ready. The new shells provided enough light to clearly see the target and correct the artillery fire.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/5-3.jpg

After sinking the merchant with a few shells, U-51 almost had the first casualty of the war (except the unfortunate photographer, of course). As the deck gun crew was climbing onto

the tower, a rogue wave came along and swept the last of them, Ralf Schultz, into the sea. The body drifted towards the stern, and he was very lucky the propellers were not spinning. His shirt caught on the rudder, and he was able to climb aboard. U-51 departed soon after.

As we continued on to our patrol grid, the shadow boat sent another contact report, this time, a convoy!! We saved enough fuel already to give chase with diesels at full power,
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/6-2.jpg

In a night like this, the watch crew would have to be highly alert in order to not miss the convoy. As we closed in to the mark where, according to trigonometry, the convoy was supposed to be, we found nothing.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/7-3.jpg

We dove to 25 meters and stopped the engines. The hydrophone operator found lots of contacts. They seemed to be behind us. The convoy has probably changed course sometime after we started chasing it. As we surfaced and turned

around, I came to the conning tower to help the watch crew. Soon after, I spotted something. It looked like a column of ships, since smoke could be made out against a less dark background, (for some reason, I could see that smoke in the game, but it is not so obvious on that screen
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/8-3.jpg

We turned the boat to a course I thought was parallel to the convoy. However, it seems that I misjudged the convoy's heading. The boat got gradually closer to the convoy, but we did not

notice that. All of a sudden, a bright light erupted off our port. As we dove, I was able to spot a Flower corvette in an instant when the periscope head was not covered in water. The Flower was heading straight for us! I am unsure how they could spot us before we could see them
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/9-3.jpg

I decided to launch decoys, but the first officer and a few crewmen glanced at me suspiciously. It was then that I realized that the decoys would not be invented for at least two more years. Cursing the incompetent naval

engineers, I ordered silence in the boat and speed of two knots. The corvette dropped some wabos behind us, and then proceeded to launch two more attacks at the same spot. It then gave up and left.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/10-3.jpg

We waited for a while, and surfaced. This time, we were traveling parallel t a convoy, and almost twice as fast. As we got in front of it, we dove and waited. The escorts did not seem to

pick us up. I raised the periscope and saw nothing. Then it hit me, we have been stationary for about half an hour, and the boat sank to 20 meters as the result. At ahead slow, we came up to periscope depth. The hydrophone

man asked me to check something out. As I listened to the contact he indicated, I thought something was different about it. The noise was not of a diesel engine. Instead, it was a high pitched whine of powerful turbines. I thought

there was no way a battleship, which sounds like that, could be in a convoy. What other ships have very powerful turbines? I held my breath and raised periscope. Of course it had to be a troop transport in a form of a Passenger Liner!!!
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/11-3.jpg

The convoy consisted of 5 columns. U-51 was positioned between 2nd and 3rd columns. The liner was in the fourth. There was also a T3 tanker in the way. In order to minimize convoy maneuvering, me and the weapons officer decided

to attack both ships simultaneously. We plotted two solutions. Two T I fast fish were to impact the liner, while one slow T II was destined for the tanker. We risked putting both T Is on magnetic mode, and left the T II on 3 meter impact, due to their horrendous unreliability in heavy seas. The torpedoes left

the tubes one after the other. The T I impacted first. The tanker must have been carrying gasoline, since it went up in a fireball. The liner resembled a certain ocean liner that struck an iceberg once... I wish we had our photographer there, what a pity
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/12-3.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/13-3.jpg

I raised the periscope once again, since we still had two torpedoes left, one in front and one in the back. It turned out there was a T3 following the passenger liner, but a coastal merchant got in the way, so I couldn't see it. The impact from the last T II was enough to send it to its maker. Or is it the sea bed?
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/14-3.jpg

I did a quick scan, and found out that a C2 cargo probably saw our scope. In any case, it was heading straight for us. Before the hull-splitting impact, I ordered a crash dive to 130 meters. A corvette and a destroyer looked for us, dropped some bombs, once again gave up and went away.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/15-3.jpg

After the convoy left, we surfaced and sailed at ahead standard perpendicular to the convoy. We then turned on a parallel course and tried to overtake it. When, according to the calculations, we were supposed to see it again, the convoy was nowhere to be found. Luckily for us our trailing boat manages to stumble on the convoy and relayed its position. It turned out the convoy changed its course. We caught up to it by daybreak. Unfortunately, we did not see a corvette that was behind us. It fired off a wild shot, and we crash dove once again. The corvette dropped some bombs, and as usual, left us alone.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/16-3.jpg

From then on, we sailed while keeping an eye on the smoke from dozens of ships. As we got ahead of the convoy again, the leading destroyer failed to pick us up. As it passed and the convoy was approaching our boat, I could finally marvel at the size of this thing. Daylight revealed many ships, excluding the ones we sank already.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/17-3.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/18-3.jpg

A T2 tanker was just ahead. It seemed proud to be in the lead of its column. So proud, in fact, that I decided to teach the captain a lesson. A single TI impact was enough. The

tanker exploded with such violence that the whole boat shook. Forward torpedo room reported leaks. I was not too happy about the deteriorating condition of the boat's hull, as well as a black eye I got from bouncing into

the periscope. The first officer commented "It's not the hull that's the problem, it's you. Why the heck do you always shoot from a distance that gives us shellshock from our own torpedo explosions??" I replied

calmly, "this way, you don't need to do the complex trigonometry." With impaired vision, I fired off a stern tube at a C3 behind us. The thunderous explosion rocked the boat fifteen seconds later. This time, the stern torpedo room reported leaks as well. The first officer

insisted we shoot at targets further away. For once, I agreed with him. We fired a T I at a C2 about 900 meters away. So much for the tanks it was carrying.

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/19-3.jpg
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/20-3.jpg
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/21-2.jpg

These last shots were extremely difficult. The sea was so rough that it rocked the boat every which way at periscope depth. As the result, the periscope head swayed around, making it impossible to get an accurate distance

approximation. Without that, there was no way to shoot torpedoes accurately. We waited some more, until the bulk of the convoy was between us and the destroyer escort. We then surfaced as fast as possible, and I ran up to the

conning tower. The stabilized UZO binoculars were all we needed to calculate a torpedo gyro angle for the last C3 of the convoy. A salvo of two impact fishes was enough to bring this one down,
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/22-3.jpg

We had to crash dive immediately, for the escorts got a bead on us. I decided that in this weather it would be near suicidal to attack this convoy again, so we broke off the chase and headed north to our patrol zone. The

sea turned even more violent, our boat was running either submerged or almost completely out of the water. Soon after, I ordered the watch crew inside, and we used out two periscopes to scan the surroundings.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/23-3.jpg

We patrolled our assigned grid without spotting a single ship. We then headed towards the English Channel in hopes of going home. The weather seemed to clear up a bit, and the wind died down to a more manageable 6m/s. This was a perfect chance to blast a lonely small merchant with our supercharged magnesium shells.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/24-3.jpg

Soon thereafter, the wind picked up again, it was howling by the conning tower at 15m/s. This kicked up waves big enough to make targeting the lonely C3 underwater an impossible feat. Therefore, we aimed our single rear torpedo using the U-boot Zieloptik and fired away. Just one impact torpedo detonating beside the engine room was enough to rupture the boilers and blow up the ship
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/25-3.jpg

The boat sailed on. Rough weather meant we had to use a slower speed to make it to port. Also, our mad dash to intercept a convoy severely depleted the fuel tanks. We sailed at ahead one-third. At this rate, we would have more than

enough fuel to make it back. However, I wanted to stick around at grid BF13 and look for some shipping there. Therefore, we needed a fuel reserve for possible chase and intercept. BF13 yielded a small tanker, which we sank with one torpedo and some HE rounds, as well as a tug boat and a small merchant.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/26-3.jpg

Then we decided to head home. We still had two torpedoes left just in case, as well as about 140 deck gun shells. Fuel, however, was starting to become scarce. As we passed French

port of Brest, I started daydreaming on the conning tower. In my dream, the Wehrmacht captured the port, which was now our home base. We sailed into the port, ending the patrol there, instead of having to traverse the treacherous Channel. In my dream, there was a band on the dock, as well as groups of people cheering.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/27-3.jpg

A rogue wave washed over the conning tower and woke me up. Well, a dream just might come true someday. As of now, we had to cross the Channel to get to Wilhelmshaven. I decided to try and sneak into Southend port and see if we can break any dishes in this British kitchen.
As we sailed through the Channel, we got reports of at least 9 or 10 cargo ships in the

vicinity. However, attacking them only to get bounced by destroyers in such shallow water would be highly unfeasible, also known as stupid. Therefore, we sneaked into Southend quite smoothly, only detected by a torpedo boat.
In the harbor, we sank a T2 with our remaining two torpedoes, as well as some deck gun rounds.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/28-3.jpg

As we sailed out underwater, the hydrophone man reported no contacts. As we surfaced, a shell screamed overhead. It turned out the hydrophone operator fell asleep and could not pick up an armed trawler just 200 meters away! The deck

gun crew ran up to the gun. We shot off the trawler's turret with the first AP round. After that, it was a duel between our 88mm cannon and their 20mm machineguns. There is little doubt who the loser was
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/29-3.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/30-4.jpg

As we were approaching home base, the chief engineer politely reported that we are out of diesel fuel. I politely told him to shove it. German diesel engines can run not just on diesel, but on virtually any flammable compound. Therefore, we poured all of the alcohol-containing odecolone on board into the fuel tanks. This was just enough to make it to port
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/31-2.jpg

Even though it was two in the morning, news of our patrol reached the base earlier than our boat made it in. A band was playing, and nurses were cheering. All of the crew could be proud, since this patrol netted another 100K+ tonnage for our glorious U-51.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/32-2.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/33-2.jpg


Thank you all for reading this! It has been a while since I posted a patrol report, so I hope everyone likes it. I tried to go into better detail explaining what happened during the patrol, so I hope you will appreciate it.

Please post your comments, as well as suggestions of what the crew of U-51 and her skipper should (and should not) do.

Foehammer-1
02-10-2007, 07:08 PM
U-51's War Crime patrol

U-51's previous patrol resulted in 49,000 tons of British shipment being sent on a one way trip to the bottom of the North Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. The base commander at Wilhelmshaven was quite impressed. He said he

would gladly order our boat outfitted with the newest technology available to the Kriegsmarine. Unfortunately, the only example of new engineering was the KDB hydrophone,

which was installed three patrols ago. Not able to thank us (except giving out a few Iron Crosses), the base commander told us that a second boat will shadow us during the upcoming patrol. That boat will then separate and relay

any contacts to us. Fair enough, I thought. 28 days later, after the crew was well-rested, the boat scrubbed and loaded, we set sail for grid AM11. I decided to divert from a direct route a

bit, in order to sail through the main convoy lane into Britain. With luck, we would catch a passing convoy before we even hit the patrol grid. U-51 set sail out of Wilhelmshaven on February 30, 1940. This is the course I hope we would follow.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/1-3.jpg

The boat sailed along the icy waters of the North Sea, engines purring in the cold night. I figured that this was the perfect image of a wolf of the sea, silent, cunning and deadly. I tried to imagine what our boat looked like from the ocean surface. I think this would be a sight to behold,
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/2-3.jpg

All of a sudden, a bright flash ripped through the bridge and blinded all of the crew. The first officer reacted before me and yelled, "ALAAARRMM!!!!" Not sure of what he was thinking, but it looked to me like a flare from

a destroyer that passed above the conning tower. Better safe than sorry. The boat quickly took up ballast and sank to twenty meters. As we went all silent, the hydrophone operator could hear nothing on the hydrophones. As the

boat surfaced, the watch crew and I went back up the conning tower, and saw nothing. It later turned out that a photographer sneaked aboard, posing as a crewman. It was a magnesium flash that blinded us all. Since this incident could

repeat and the flash could give away our position, we promptly threw the photographer overboard. Later, the crew discovered a twenty-kilogram box full of magnesium flash hidden in the bilge under the deck plates. Since we

unloaded the twenty flare shells for the deck gun in order to have more room for HE charges, there was no way to illuminate the night sky, until now. I ordered the HE shells taken off

the casings, and a dose of magnesium flash injected into each casing. This was a decent way to spend time during a long voyage to the shipping lines.

Just north of Scapa Flow, our trailing boat separated and moved further forward. Later, a radio report came, hailing us. It turned out a merchant was heading straight for us. I plotted an intercept course and our U-51 started the chase,
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/3-3.jpg

We soon found our target, a lone coastal merchant. I ordered the deck gun crew on deck, as well as our modified shells to be loaded. The test was successful. A flash of light should be enough to provide illumination at

night, if it works during the day. It seemed that with magnesium flash the shells fly at a much higher velocity, and it only took 5 shells to down this merchant for good.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/4-3.jpg

As we sailed along, the weather changed for the worse, with winds around 14m/s and medium fog. After the night settled in, our shadowing boat radioed another contact, this one in grid AM51.

As we approached, we could barely make out a silhouette of a small merchant. I did not want to waste a torpedo on this one, so we closed in, deck gun ready. The new shells provided enough light to clearly see the target and correct the artillery fire.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/5-3.jpg

After sinking the merchant with a few shells, U-51 almost had the first casualty of the war (except the unfortunate photographer, of course). As the deck gun crew was climbing onto

the tower, a rogue wave came along and swept the last of them, Ralf Schultz, into the sea. The body drifted towards the stern, and he was very lucky the propellers were not spinning. His shirt caught on the rudder, and he was able to climb aboard. U-51 departed soon after.

As we continued on to our patrol grid, the shadow boat sent another contact report, this time, a convoy!! We saved enough fuel already to give chase with diesels at full power,
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/6-2.jpg

In a night like this, the watch crew would have to be highly alert in order to not miss the convoy. As we closed in to the mark where, according to trigonometry, the convoy was supposed to be, we found nothing.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/7-3.jpg

We dove to 25 meters and stopped the engines. The hydrophone operator found lots of contacts. They seemed to be behind us. The convoy has probably changed course sometime after we started chasing it. As we surfaced and turned

around, I came to the conning tower to help the watch crew. Soon after, I spotted something. It looked like a column of ships, since smoke could be made out against a less dark background, (for some reason, I could see that smoke in the game, but it is not so obvious on that screen
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/8-3.jpg

We turned the boat to a course I thought was parallel to the convoy. However, it seems that I misjudged the convoy's heading. The boat got gradually closer to the convoy, but we did not

notice that. All of a sudden, a bright light erupted off our port. As we dove, I was able to spot a Flower corvette in an instant when the periscope head was not covered in water. The Flower was heading straight for us! I am unsure how they could spot us before we could see them
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/9-3.jpg

I decided to launch decoys, but the first officer and a few crewmen glanced at me suspiciously. It was then that I realized that the decoys would not be invented for at least two more years. Cursing the incompetent naval

engineers, I ordered silence in the boat and speed of two knots. The corvette dropped some wabos behind us, and then proceeded to launch two more attacks at the same spot. It then gave up and left.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/10-3.jpg

We waited for a while, and surfaced. This time, we were traveling parallel t a convoy, and almost twice as fast. As we got in front of it, we dove and waited. The escorts did not seem to

pick us up. I raised the periscope and saw nothing. Then it hit me, we have been stationary for about half an hour, and the boat sank to 20 meters as the result. At ahead slow, we came up to periscope depth. The hydrophone

man asked me to check something out. As I listened to the contact he indicated, I thought something was different about it. The noise was not of a diesel engine. Instead, it was a high pitched whine of powerful turbines. I thought

there was no way a battleship, which sounds like that, could be in a convoy. What other ships have very powerful turbines? I held my breath and raised periscope. Of course it had to be a troop transport in a form of a Passenger Liner!!!
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/11-3.jpg

The convoy consisted of 5 columns. U-51 was positioned between 2nd and 3rd columns. The liner was in the fourth. There was also a T3 tanker in the way. In order to minimize convoy maneuvering, me and the weapons officer decided

to attack both ships simultaneously. We plotted two solutions. Two T I fast fish were to impact the liner, while one slow T II was destined for the tanker. We risked putting both T Is on magnetic mode, and left the T II on 3 meter impact, due to their horrendous unreliability in heavy seas. The torpedoes left

the tubes one after the other. The T I impacted first. The tanker must have been carrying gasoline, since it went up in a fireball. The liner resembled a certain ocean liner that struck an iceberg once... I wish we had our photographer there, what a pity
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/12-3.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/13-3.jpg

I raised the periscope once again, since we still had two torpedoes left, one in front and one in the back. It turned out there was a T3 following the passenger liner, but a coastal merchant got in the way, so I couldn't see it. The impact from the last T II was enough to send it to its maker. Or is it the sea bed?
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/14-3.jpg

I did a quick scan, and found out that a C2 cargo probably saw our scope. In any case, it was heading straight for us. Before the hull-splitting impact, I ordered a crash dive to 130 meters. A corvette and a destroyer looked for us, dropped some bombs, once again gave up and went away.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/15-3.jpg

After the convoy left, we surfaced and sailed at ahead standard perpendicular to the convoy. We then turned on a parallel course and tried to overtake it. When, according to the calculations, we were supposed to see it again, the convoy was nowhere to be found. Luckily for us our trailing boat manages to stumble on the convoy and relayed its position. It turned out the convoy changed its course. We caught up to it by daybreak. Unfortunately, we did not see a corvette that was behind us. It fired off a wild shot, and we crash dove once again. The corvette dropped some bombs, and as usual, left us alone.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/16-3.jpg

From then on, we sailed while keeping an eye on the smoke from dozens of ships. As we got ahead of the convoy again, the leading destroyer failed to pick us up. As it passed and the convoy was approaching our boat, I could finally marvel at the size of this thing. Daylight revealed many ships, excluding the ones we sank already.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/17-3.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/18-3.jpg

A T2 tanker was just ahead. It seemed proud to be in the lead of its column. So proud, in fact, that I decided to teach the captain a lesson. A single TI impact was enough. The

tanker exploded with such violence that the whole boat shook. Forward torpedo room reported leaks. I was not too happy about the deteriorating condition of the boat's hull, as well as a black eye I got from bouncing into

the periscope. The first officer commented "It's not the hull that's the problem, it's you. Why the heck do you always shoot from a distance that gives us shellshock from our own torpedo explosions??" I replied

calmly, "this way, you don't need to do the complex trigonometry." With impaired vision, I fired off a stern tube at a C3 behind us. The thunderous explosion rocked the boat fifteen seconds later. This time, the stern torpedo room reported leaks as well. The first officer

insisted we shoot at targets further away. For once, I agreed with him. We fired a T I at a C2 about 900 meters away. So much for the tanks it was carrying.

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/19-3.jpg
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/20-3.jpg
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/21-2.jpg

These last shots were extremely difficult. The sea was so rough that it rocked the boat every which way at periscope depth. As the result, the periscope head swayed around, making it impossible to get an accurate distance

approximation. Without that, there was no way to shoot torpedoes accurately. We waited some more, until the bulk of the convoy was between us and the destroyer escort. We then surfaced as fast as possible, and I ran up to the

conning tower. The stabilized UZO binoculars were all we needed to calculate a torpedo gyro angle for the last C3 of the convoy. A salvo of two impact fishes was enough to bring this one down,
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/22-3.jpg

We had to crash dive immediately, for the escorts got a bead on us. I decided that in this weather it would be near suicidal to attack this convoy again, so we broke off the chase and headed north to our patrol zone. The

sea turned even more violent, our boat was running either submerged or almost completely out of the water. Soon after, I ordered the watch crew inside, and we used out two periscopes to scan the surroundings.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/23-3.jpg

We patrolled our assigned grid without spotting a single ship. We then headed towards the English Channel in hopes of going home. The weather seemed to clear up a bit, and the wind died down to a more manageable 6m/s. This was a perfect chance to blast a lonely small merchant with our supercharged magnesium shells.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/24-3.jpg

Soon thereafter, the wind picked up again, it was howling by the conning tower at 15m/s. This kicked up waves big enough to make targeting the lonely C3 underwater an impossible feat. Therefore, we aimed our single rear torpedo using the U-boot Zieloptik and fired away. Just one impact torpedo detonating beside the engine room was enough to rupture the boilers and blow up the ship
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/25-3.jpg

The boat sailed on. Rough weather meant we had to use a slower speed to make it to port. Also, our mad dash to intercept a convoy severely depleted the fuel tanks. We sailed at ahead one-third. At this rate, we would have more than

enough fuel to make it back. However, I wanted to stick around at grid BF13 and look for some shipping there. Therefore, we needed a fuel reserve for possible chase and intercept. BF13 yielded a small tanker, which we sank with one torpedo and some HE rounds, as well as a tug boat and a small merchant.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/26-3.jpg

Then we decided to head home. We still had two torpedoes left just in case, as well as about 140 deck gun shells. Fuel, however, was starting to become scarce. As we passed French

port of Brest, I started daydreaming on the conning tower. In my dream, the Wehrmacht captured the port, which was now our home base. We sailed into the port, ending the patrol there, instead of having to traverse the treacherous Channel. In my dream, there was a band on the dock, as well as groups of people cheering.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/27-3.jpg

A rogue wave washed over the conning tower and woke me up. Well, a dream just might come true someday. As of now, we had to cross the Channel to get to Wilhelmshaven. I decided to try and sneak into Southend port and see if we can break any dishes in this British kitchen.
As we sailed through the Channel, we got reports of at least 9 or 10 cargo ships in the

vicinity. However, attacking them only to get bounced by destroyers in such shallow water would be highly unfeasible, also known as stupid. Therefore, we sneaked into Southend quite smoothly, only detected by a torpedo boat.
In the harbor, we sank a T2 with our remaining two torpedoes, as well as some deck gun rounds.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/28-3.jpg

As we sailed out underwater, the hydrophone man reported no contacts. As we surfaced, a shell screamed overhead. It turned out the hydrophone operator fell asleep and could not pick up an armed trawler just 200 meters away! The deck

gun crew ran up to the gun. We shot off the trawler's turret with the first AP round. After that, it was a duel between our 88mm cannon and their 20mm machineguns. There is little doubt who the loser was
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/29-3.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/30-4.jpg

As we were approaching home base, the chief engineer politely reported that we are out of diesel fuel. I politely told him to shove it. German diesel engines can run not just on diesel, but on virtually any flammable compound. Therefore, we poured all of the alcohol-containing odecolone on board into the fuel tanks. This was just enough to make it to port
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/31-2.jpg

Even though it was two in the morning, news of our patrol reached the base earlier than our boat made it in. A band was playing, and nurses were cheering. All of the crew could be proud, since this patrol netted another 100K+ tonnage for our glorious U-51.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/32-2.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/Foehammer88/33-2.jpg


Thank you all for reading this! It has been a while since I posted a patrol report, so I hope everyone likes it. I tried to go into better detail explaining what happened during the patrol, so I hope you will appreciate it.

Please post your comments, as well as suggestions of what the crew of U-51 and her skipper should (and should not) do.

ottoramsaig
02-10-2007, 08:52 PM
Just thought I would let you know that realprotto is using U51

Heinrich505
02-10-2007, 10:50 PM
Nice, very nice. The screenshots were excellent and added perfectly to the patrol.

tuddley3
02-10-2007, 10:52 PM
If only you could submit screenies with your report to the Story Comp, this would be a winner http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Foehammer-1
02-11-2007, 05:06 AM
I would, but aren't the short stories and patrol reports not the same thing?

@ottoramsaig, I care not, just to let you know. U-51 is the name the game gave to my boat, and that's the way it's gonna be

ottoramsaig
03-02-2007, 07:43 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Foehammer-1:
I would, but aren't the short stories and patrol reports not the same thing?

@ottoramsaig, I care not, just to let you know. U-51 is the name the game gave to my boat, and that's the way it's gonna be </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Easy there tough guy! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

bfogel
10-06-2008, 11:21 PM
Interesting!
Good job, more?
B

Foehammer-1
10-07-2008, 07:36 AM
I'd write more, but there are three problems.

a) Only a few people actually like them
b) I can't make them comparable to Psychfilm, paulHager or KH's
and c) I'm too busy with uni to play SH3 http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif