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ploughman
08-16-2007, 11:05 AM
I've been reading a little lately about emergent technologies that are likely to revolutionise our computers and screens in the not too distant future.

Much of the revolution seems to be centred around quantum computing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_computing) and Spintronics (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spintronics). Quantum processors may be a reality (not for you or I but this stuff seems to trickle down rapidly) in the next few years offering a 100 fold leap in processing power, over a similar cost current system, and the ability to store and retrieve data at luminal speeds without the heat problems or energy demands associated with current systems. Data storage will also enjoy a revolution (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/6935638.stm) with amounts being stored growing hugely whilst volumes and retrieval times shrink dramatically.

A whole host of monitor type tech (http://colossalstorage.net/) is maturing that offer a greater range of flexibility to interface designers (a convicing visor mounted viewing system anyone?).

Much of this stuff is on the verge of entering the market. Within a few years it might even be in our computers.

Anyone more in the know have any skinny on this stuff?

ploughman
08-16-2007, 11:05 AM
I've been reading a little lately about emergent technologies that are likely to revolutionise our computers and screens in the not too distant future.

Much of the revolution seems to be centred around quantum computing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_computing) and Spintronics (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spintronics). Quantum processors may be a reality (not for you or I but this stuff seems to trickle down rapidly) in the next few years offering a 100 fold leap in processing power, over a similar cost current system, and the ability to store and retrieve data at luminal speeds without the heat problems or energy demands associated with current systems. Data storage will also enjoy a revolution (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/6935638.stm) with amounts being stored growing hugely whilst volumes and retrieval times shrink dramatically.

A whole host of monitor type tech (http://colossalstorage.net/) is maturing that offer a greater range of flexibility to interface designers (a convicing visor mounted viewing system anyone?).

Much of this stuff is on the verge of entering the market. Within a few years it might even be in our computers.

Anyone more in the know have any skinny on this stuff?

p-11.cAce
08-16-2007, 11:14 AM
I'm already amazed by the amount of memory required by some of my normal computing tasks - My IL2 folder is over 9Gb, my World of Warcraft folder is over 6, and SHIV is over 5. I've got 20+Gb of stock photos, wav files, and assorted animations I use for my job. All together I've got almost 3/4 of a 300Gb drive filled - and now Dell is offering a terabyte of storage in their XPS systems. Unbelievable really - when I was a kid I thought the cassette drive on my Ti99-4a was all I'd ever need http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/typing.gif

Bearcat99
08-16-2007, 07:21 PM
I am just waiting with baited breath for the OLED tecnology to take off. I can see the dsy coming within the next 7 years when we will have affordable moldable computer screens. Imagine a simpit with the screen molded in the shape of a cockpit canopy.

Choctaw111
08-16-2007, 07:27 PM
Computers will just keep getting better and better. I just see how far they have come since my Commodore 64...and back then I thought they were the bees knees! Imagine where computers will be in another 25 years.

heywooood
08-16-2007, 07:47 PM
our technological growth, aided as it is by these more and increasingly more powerful machines, will only accelerate - imagination is the only limiting factor.

Advancements that would have taken decades will soon go from conception to utilization in a matter of weeks...or days.

Imagine

FritzGryphon
08-16-2007, 08:07 PM
I know not what computers will be running SoW. But I do know that SoW II will be played with sticks and pebbles on hexes drawn in the sand. The oldschool wargamers will reign supreme in the post apocalyptic wastes of the post apocalypse (the mail just stopped coming one day and everything fell apart).

Industry and infrastructure is built like a house of cards, and technology can more easily regress than advance in times of crisis.

carguy_
08-16-2007, 08:15 PM
Well from my POV ppl always thought impossible would get possible in no time but it never was that fast.Ofcourse wars were the big speeding up factor but look at the cartoons.In the Jetsons and not only, things were very modern.Although we did not see some things because the author probbly didn`t imagine so, but from sixties perspective, creating a meal from a single pill is piece of cake ,right?

By now there sohuld be no hunger, no need for wars, cars and planes.Somewhere I heard that from 80s on things have been developping very fast.It doesn`t impress me though.It`s pretty obvious that some technologies already existing are out of this world but what`s the use if societies can`t use`em?I thought the technology progress would mainly make things super cheap and economic but I don`t own a car that runs on water yet.

A missile if doesn`t find a target can select another one by itself, it can surpass most obstacles, but what does that mean to Kowalsky?

In 1992 I was playin Boulder Dash, now I fly a virtual plane in a virtual world sweating,sensing fear and euphoria from a won fight, racing cars, fighting battles with hundreds of troops.

Personally, I don`t care much for entertainment-purpose technologies.The friggin Focke Wulf bar is still there and I have a feeling that it won`t leave for a little longer.

BaldieJr
08-16-2007, 08:38 PM
eat the rich. check out my sig.

as for computing power: its a shame that stupid people are allowed to play with computers. the perfect operating system was built in the 70's but dumb people want eveything made easy so the smarties keep trying to make it easier to use by adding more crud to the equation. layer upon layer of abstraction, bugs, and ignorance have giving us worthless machines that do nearly nothing without an investment of just.a.few.more.dollars.

it makes me sick. i blame tacticool.

VW-IceFire
08-16-2007, 09:22 PM
The theory is that one day we'll have computers fast enough that they will start solving all sorts of problems for us in very rapid succession. At that point we'll reach something called "singularity" where advancements are made at a very rapid pace...kind of scary but somewhere off there in the future.

Back a little from that, for now I see the usual refinement of the typical x86 platform with more cores and the eventual removal of the FSB infavour of something like hypertransport but for all devices.