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View Full Version : WOuld I play better with a headset instead of speakers?



Superjew1
01-04-2009, 06:43 PM
One thing I havent mastered is how to keep my plane from stalling when doing turns. Maybe Im choosing the wrong plane (the hellcat) or maybe its just because im a huge novice, but I was wondering if I would be more aware of stalling out and hear the plane shuddering if I used a headset instead of a 6 speaker surround sound.

Superjew1
01-04-2009, 06:43 PM
One thing I havent mastered is how to keep my plane from stalling when doing turns. Maybe Im choosing the wrong plane (the hellcat) or maybe its just because im a huge novice, but I was wondering if I would be more aware of stalling out and hear the plane shuddering if I used a headset instead of a 6 speaker surround sound.

ImMoreBetter
01-04-2009, 07:49 PM
It could help.

But, I do not think it is necessary. Unless you play with your speakers at really low volumes.


When you stall, what airspeed are you typically at?


The problem isn't the plane.

Take a break from attempting to dogfight. Just try flying around without any enemies. It is much easier to avoid stalling when you are in a controlled environment.

Pull back on the stick as slowly as possible. One millimeter at a time. If it feels stupid, you're doing it right.

The very instant your plane stalls, let go of the stick. If you don't, you are likely to spin.

That is how I learned it. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

SeaFireLIV
01-04-2009, 07:50 PM
I doubt it. The sound isn`t really everything as you may or may not get some warning from the aircraft as well (how it`s acting on the edge of the stall). Some planes don`t even give much of a sound warning, if any, imho. You do have some physical cues too.

It`s just the old preactise, practise, practise until you know how far you can go.

M_Gunz
01-05-2009, 02:47 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Superjew1:
One thing I havent mastered is how to keep my plane from stalling when doing turns. Maybe Im choosing the wrong plane (the hellcat) or maybe its just because im a huge novice, but I was wondering if I would be more aware of stalling out and hear the plane shuddering if I used a headset instead of a 6 speaker surround sound. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

As above, your #1 problem is your speed.
#2 is not knowing what you can do in whatever plane you've decided to fly.

Watch your speed as you pull stick, if it starts dropping off rapidly then loosen up on the stick.

What they say to pilot beginners; pull on the stick and the houses get smaller, keep the stick back and the houses get bigger again.

tagTaken2
01-05-2009, 03:12 AM
Force feedback is your answer. I didn't really stop stalling until I got a FFB stick.

JimmyBlonde
01-05-2009, 04:23 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Superjew1:
I was wondering if I would be more aware of stalling out and hear the plane shuddering if I used a headset instead of a 6 speaker surround sound. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Sounds to me like you need to watch as well as listen.

Sometimes you will get fixated on an objective like an EA or a landing pattern and this will cause you to ignore visual and audio cues.

Try taking your F6F up to 20 thou and getting to know the natural stall warnings she gives you and then apply this knowledge during ops.

Choctaw111
01-05-2009, 08:16 AM
If you are married, then you would definitely be better off.
As far as feeling the surround effect, it is modeled in game for the headset. I do prefer the headset over speakers as I can not be distracted by any "external" noises.

blairgowrie
01-05-2009, 08:35 AM
If you ever hope to fly on-line then you will need a headset with a microphone to use Teamspeak or Ventrillo. No need to spend a lot.

Ba5tard5word
01-05-2009, 10:24 AM
Keep practicing and you'll eventually get a feel for what will make a plane stall and flip over in a turn. Each plane is different.

iroseland
01-05-2009, 11:40 AM
do lots of carrier traps, once you get good at flying the pattern and making good traps flying the hellcat on the edge of the stall envelope becomes easy..

This will help..

http://www.bss214.com/cq/cq.htm

Trust me, flying CQ is about as not sexy as it gets, but it really goes a long way in making you good at the flying part.

BSS_AIJO

Aaron_GT
01-05-2009, 03:58 PM
I avoid carrier stuff - it is so intense I get quite stressed out by it. So yes, if you master the carrier you've got it made!

CrazySchmidt
01-07-2009, 03:09 AM
Nope, practice and familiarity is what you need, both audio and visual.

It's like anything in life... how can one possibly hope to know what is best if one hasn't experienced the full scope of what one is dealing with?

It's like trying to deal with averages when the range is 1 or 2!!

Patience and experience are the most painful paths, but also the most rewarding. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

CS. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

RPMcMurphy
01-07-2009, 10:44 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Superjew1:
One thing I havent mastered is how to keep my plane from stalling when doing turns. Maybe Im choosing the wrong plane (the hellcat) or maybe its just because im a huge novice, but I was wondering if I would be more aware of stalling out and hear the plane shuddering if I used a headset instead of a 6 speaker surround sound. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Headphones won't help that much if your just trying to learn how to keep from stalling. Are you sure you are stalling? when turning?, or is the plane flipping around real fast and snap-rolling and going into a spin, because there's a diference there.
You need to use some rudder in the same dir as the turn and watch how much pitch you pull, and the engine torque will make you snap roll depending on its a left or right turn. If you are in a steep turn the plane will want to roll in the oposite dir the prop is turning.

Try flying with power off and go into a steep glide from 5000 ft and do some turns w/o power youll see big diff. Make sure the settings are on full-real. Just keep trying and never quit. It'll come to you.

..or you can try a gently banked 360* turn(w/power), then try it again a little more banked, then a little more and tighter and tighter until you find the spot.

BTW: headphones would help me I know because when I fly IL2 most the time I hear my 2 year old and my infant boy crying and screaming, the telephones ringing, things are crashing and banging around the house, people are walking right behind me, nieghbors are visiting with thier kids etc. the 'P' is getting worn out on my keyboard.

JSG72
01-07-2009, 04:08 PM
Darn!

You actually need to fly with headphomes and speakers. Thats what it's like. IRL. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Stingray333
01-07-2009, 06:39 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by JSG72:
Darn!

You actually need to fly with headphomes and speakers. Thats what it's like. IRL. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ha ha.. I fly with a headset on, and speakers, with the speakers cranked, so I can "feel" the sounds http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif If I am flying online with TS, I typically turn down the speakers so there is no bleed into the mic. I do find that I can hear the "buffeting" sound at the onset of a stall a little bit better in the headphones than with speakers, so headphones might help, but it depends on your speakers of course, mine are $25 logitech computer desktop speakers, nothing special.

Have a look at your wing tips once and a while if your turning.. if you see white mist coming off them, you are turning too hard. Also, pay attention to the rate of turn and how your plane is responding to the stick, if the response starts to get slow and mushy, your first inclination might be to pull the stick harder, to maintain the turn rate, but that is only going to onset the stall much worse! This is where you want to lighten the turn a little bit. Also, if a wing starts to dip to enter a stall, you can apply opposite rudder to some extent to help "keep the wing up". This is poor technique however, as the wing shouldn't have dipped in the first place!

Perhaps one thing to think about is "unloading" the wings prior to changing direction, i.e. if you want to roll but you are pulling back on the stick, first relax the stick, unload the wings, and then roll, stop the roll, and then resume pulling back on the stick, rather than asking the plane to roll when the wings are "loaded". The same thing with applying the rudder. Try pulling back hard on the stick and climbing, then quickly apply full rudder. You should instantly begin an "auto-rotation", or a "snap-roll" as it is called, which is just your plane stalling on one wing, and the wing that is not stalled pushes the plane around in a loop by itself without any aileron input (hence the term auto-rotation). If get a feeling for what its like to get the plane to stall suddenly and violently in a snap-roll, it might provide some insight into the stalls that you are experiencing, and might help you stop them from happening (or at least help improve your recovery).

As mentioned above, keep your speed up when performing maneuvers, but keep in mind that you can stall at any speed!

Good luck, have fun!

Stingray

WTE_Galway
01-07-2009, 08:42 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by JSG72:
Darn!

You actually need to fly with headphomes and speakers. Thats what it's like. IRL. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

If you really want real life you would have to buy a set of Dave Clark's, though a good set are probably worth more than most PC's.


http://flysunstate.com/store/media/h10_13X.jpg

Stingray333
01-07-2009, 09:53 PM
I looked into getting a set of the Dave Clarke headsets for flight simming. Someone on an FSX forum claimed to have tried it and that the sound wasn't very good, as the real aviation headphones are not designed for full audio reproduction, but to make voice-level voice-frequencies very clear so the pilot can understand what is being said. I think these might be a good set for simulators, haven't heard how they are from anyone... look kinda heavy, add a track clip pro on that, I think my neck would get sore after a few hours

http://www.saitek.com/uk/prod/pfhead.htm

http://www.saitek.com/uk/images/product/pfheadset.jpg