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View Full Version : Interesting BoB snippet...British Farmer has breakfast with downed Me 109 pilot!



MB_Avro_UK
07-01-2008, 04:08 PM
Hi all,

This is interesting. The German pilot of an Me 109 during the Battle of Britain was shot down in October 1940.

He was 'captured' by a farmer who took him home for breakfast!

http://www.geocities.com:80/abbertonroh/germans.htm

From the above link:

The German pilot, Oberfeldwebel Josef Harmeling managed to land in the fields around Wick Farm , Langenhoe. He was wounded and survived to become a POW.

Apparently he was captured by the local gamekeeper, Jum (short for Jumbo) Brown, who was a private in the Essex Home Guard. He took his rifle and rushed over 2 fields to the plane, where he called on Harmeling to surrender. Fortunately for Harmeling he did ,as Jum was a crack shot. Jum prevented him from setting fire to the plane and as a result a complete plane with all its ammunition fell into British hands. Jum took Harmeling home for breakfast. When he had finished his breakfast, Jum marched him across to the local Regular Army detachment.

Jum said that when Harmeling crashed, the British plane followed him down to see that he landed alright and that the 2 pilots waved to each other. Jum was awarded a Certificate by the Home Guard in recognition of his bravery in single handed sorting out the capture of plane and pilot.

The following is a translation of a letter (*) by Josef Harmeling describing his ordeal :-

Here is an account of my sortie on 29th October 1940, on which date I became a prisoner of war in England.

It was late in the afternoon, about 1700 hours (local time) when about 40 Messerschmitts Bf 109's of my Gruppe took off from Calais/Marck airfield. We headed on a course for London and reached the English coast at about 6,000 metres.

Our Gruppe's objective was an airfield to the north-east of London (North Weald). This was a diversionary feint attack about 20 kilometres from the primary target and we took the opportunity to descend to about 4-500 metres for the attack.

It was at this altitude that we struck at the target with bombs and our fixed armament and it was during this low-level attack that I received a hit in the radiator system, presumably from the ground defences. The result was that the coolant temperature rose quickly and the motor commenced losing revs. with alarming speed. However, I sought to gain height, in case I had to get out in an emergency.

Soon after this two British fighters, a Spitfire and a Hurricane attacked me and I was unfortunately wounded in the head and right arm whilst at an altitude of about 80 metres.

Eye witnesses later reported that my machine burned where it came to rest in a rural area near Colchester. After my (pancake) landing I summoned my strength to jump out of my aircraft and attempt to destroy it but some British soldiers intervened. By now I had recovered and took the opportunity to thank those who helped me. They were, to me, safety- although enemies, those who first gave me aid.

The Doctor who removed a fragment of metal from my person also treated me in an exemplary manner... signed Josef Harmeling

Jum also had another plane nearly hit his home. This was a Wellington bomber that crash landed in a nearby hedge. The bomber was piloted by a member of the Wills tobacco family. Jum provided First Aid to the pilot. Having called the police and an ambulance, he then tended to the other members of the crew.



Best Regards,
MB_Avro.

MB_Avro_UK
07-01-2008, 04:08 PM
Hi all,

This is interesting. The German pilot of an Me 109 during the Battle of Britain was shot down in October 1940.

He was 'captured' by a farmer who took him home for breakfast!

http://www.geocities.com:80/abbertonroh/germans.htm

From the above link:

The German pilot, Oberfeldwebel Josef Harmeling managed to land in the fields around Wick Farm , Langenhoe. He was wounded and survived to become a POW.

Apparently he was captured by the local gamekeeper, Jum (short for Jumbo) Brown, who was a private in the Essex Home Guard. He took his rifle and rushed over 2 fields to the plane, where he called on Harmeling to surrender. Fortunately for Harmeling he did ,as Jum was a crack shot. Jum prevented him from setting fire to the plane and as a result a complete plane with all its ammunition fell into British hands. Jum took Harmeling home for breakfast. When he had finished his breakfast, Jum marched him across to the local Regular Army detachment.

Jum said that when Harmeling crashed, the British plane followed him down to see that he landed alright and that the 2 pilots waved to each other. Jum was awarded a Certificate by the Home Guard in recognition of his bravery in single handed sorting out the capture of plane and pilot.

The following is a translation of a letter (*) by Josef Harmeling describing his ordeal :-

Here is an account of my sortie on 29th October 1940, on which date I became a prisoner of war in England.

It was late in the afternoon, about 1700 hours (local time) when about 40 Messerschmitts Bf 109's of my Gruppe took off from Calais/Marck airfield. We headed on a course for London and reached the English coast at about 6,000 metres.

Our Gruppe's objective was an airfield to the north-east of London (North Weald). This was a diversionary feint attack about 20 kilometres from the primary target and we took the opportunity to descend to about 4-500 metres for the attack.

It was at this altitude that we struck at the target with bombs and our fixed armament and it was during this low-level attack that I received a hit in the radiator system, presumably from the ground defences. The result was that the coolant temperature rose quickly and the motor commenced losing revs. with alarming speed. However, I sought to gain height, in case I had to get out in an emergency.

Soon after this two British fighters, a Spitfire and a Hurricane attacked me and I was unfortunately wounded in the head and right arm whilst at an altitude of about 80 metres.

Eye witnesses later reported that my machine burned where it came to rest in a rural area near Colchester. After my (pancake) landing I summoned my strength to jump out of my aircraft and attempt to destroy it but some British soldiers intervened. By now I had recovered and took the opportunity to thank those who helped me. They were, to me, safety- although enemies, those who first gave me aid.

The Doctor who removed a fragment of metal from my person also treated me in an exemplary manner... signed Josef Harmeling

Jum also had another plane nearly hit his home. This was a Wellington bomber that crash landed in a nearby hedge. The bomber was piloted by a member of the Wills tobacco family. Jum provided First Aid to the pilot. Having called the police and an ambulance, he then tended to the other members of the crew.



Best Regards,
MB_Avro.

JSG72
07-01-2008, 04:45 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Jum also had another plane nearly hit his home. This was a Wellington bomber that crash landed in a nearby hedge. The bomber was piloted by a member of the Wills tobacco family. Jum provided First Aid to the pilot. Having called the police and an ambulance, he then tended to the other members of the crew </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Interesting. In tht the fact that the German pilots experience was translated and documented, for us to peruse.
Yet the British Experience. Is just a meer footnote. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

dwaindibley
07-01-2008, 04:46 PM
A great snippet of history, thank you http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif
It's always good to read about the humanity displayed on all sides during wartime. It acts as a counter balance to all the brutality normally associated with human conflict .... imho http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

Edit: Including Youtube snuff videos ... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

Xiolablu3
07-02-2008, 09:03 AM
Hehe, nice read thanks!