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dlg26
06-25-2006, 08:06 AM
~S~ All, quick question, how do u come out of a stall, spin, I usually watch the horizon go round or bail out, I think came out of one once but it was luck, any help appreciated, tks

Dlg26 http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

dlg26
06-25-2006, 08:06 AM
~S~ All, quick question, how do u come out of a stall, spin, I usually watch the horizon go round or bail out, I think came out of one once but it was luck, any help appreciated, tks

Dlg26 http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Speedfellow
06-25-2006, 08:14 AM
What I usually do is
1.Cut the throttle
2.Stick forward
3.apply reverse rudder

However some spins you just cant seem to recover from

VW-IceFire
06-25-2006, 11:03 AM
Depends alot on the plane. Spin recovery is easy in some and near impossible in others. The P-39 is a deathtrap in a spin...as the real one was.

jetguy06
06-25-2006, 12:09 PM
As Ice-fire says....it all depends on the plane.However, I find my best tactic is to let the stick go completely and let the plane correct itself.Maybe it's just me, though.Try it and see. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

dlg26
06-25-2006, 12:45 PM
Roger that guys thanks for the input http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

flyin_scotzzman
06-25-2006, 02:32 PM
Hi dlg26

What I usually do is all of the above, then if the spin continues try dropping the undercarriage, if that don't work jump!!

neil_1821
06-25-2006, 03:11 PM
i use a lot of methods, as said reverse rudder can be used, i also rev the engine, e.g full throttle and close, repeatedly. That can work sometimes. As a last resort i will use stages of flaps coupled with the landing gear and rudder to recover, but that wouldnt work in real life. The lesson is not to enter the spin in the first place http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/touche.gif

idonno
06-25-2006, 03:49 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by neil_1821:
...i also rev the engine, e.g full throttle and close, repeatedly. That can work sometimes. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

In aircraft where the prop spins clockwise (as viewed from the cockpit), which is most of them, this should only make a spin to the left worse if anything. The left yawing motion that results will help to keep the left wing stalled. However, in a spin to the right, a yaw to the left is exactly what you need to un-stall the right wing.

idonno
06-25-2006, 04:02 PM
I'm sure this is much of what put airplanes in the water on botched CV landings. In addition to the engine's torque rolling the airplane to the left at a time when the airplane's aileron authority was greatly reduced due to it's slow airspeed, the yaw to the left (resulting from spiraling slipstream and P-factor) cause the left wing to lose lift and the right wing to gain it. This is exactly the opposite of what is needed to keep the airplane upright.

slipBall
06-25-2006, 04:30 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by dlg26:
~S~ All, quick question, how do u come out of a stall, spin, I usually watch the horizon go round or bail out, I think came out of one once but it was luck, any help appreciated, tks

Dlg26 http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


To recover from a stall, if altitude permits, apply full power, jam the stick all the way forward. Correct for any spin by applying oposite rudder

EiZ0N
06-25-2006, 04:52 PM
I always push the stick fully forward and apply opposite rudder. If you're low, cut the throttle.

DHC2Pilot
06-25-2006, 09:46 PM
IRL - Hold the stick back and apply full opposite rudder (neutral ailerons, throttle cut). When the rotation slows and is just about to stop, push the stick forward and pop the airplane out of the stalled condition, apply full throttle, and level off. Timing is important here because if you dont exit the stalled condition after rotation stops, it is possible to re-enter another spin in the other direction. You don't want to push the stick forward first while applying opposite rudder because then you run the risk of entering a steep spiral which may overstress the airframe during recovery. Some aircraft have peculiar or even violent spin characteristics which are difficult to recover from. Most recover easily using the method outlined above.

idonno
06-26-2006, 08:53 AM
DHC2Pilot,

This sounds like some new or alternative school of thought in spin recovery. Where did you get this kind of instruction?

I did read some time back that the P-39's spin recovery technique was unique in that you held the stick back and waited for one of the slow rotations (it would alternate between fast and slow rotations throughout the spin) before pushing it forward. I tried this in an earlier version of IL2 and it seemed to help.

triad773
06-26-2006, 09:00 AM
Yes I've become reasonably proficient in spin recovery, or at least I thought I had. Was in a P-39 yesterday and was reminded as mentioned above that yes, that plane in a spin IS a death trap. Cut throttle, opposite full rudder, doesn't even seem to slow it down much. Guess thats why I had avoided the P-39 before. Why should I stop now? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Rattler68
06-26-2006, 10:56 AM
I find that lowering the flaps helps too, besides cutting the throttle and stick forward. Remember to raise them as soon as the spin stops, but keep the nose down until you gain enough speed to prevent another stall (altitude permitting, of course!)

DHC2Pilot
06-26-2006, 06:03 PM
Where did it come from? Real life. While it is true that pushing the stick forward first will recover you from the spin, you also lose a lot more altitude that way. In spin recovery the object is to lose as little altitude as possible during the maneuver. Entering a steep spiral during recovery only brings the ground up to meet you much faster. I've done over 1500 spins in everything from a J-3 cub to a Cessna 310. Now, in retrospect, I guess the question was answered from the perspective of a flight instructor. I prefer to have the student hold the airplane in the spin and get a sense for what the aircraft is doing. Keeping the stick back in your gut is one way to do that. For students the hardest thing to overcome is to push the stick forward when the nose is pointed down. Using rudder first in conjunction with throttle (if necessary) to stop or slow the yaw first is the most effective method to minimize loss of altitude. If the yaw doesn't slow down then hopefully you have enough altitude to push the stick forward all the way and give the throttle a good blast to break the stall and then recover from the spiral. No, this method is not effective on ALL aircraft - I agree. It all depends on the design, wing loading, Center of gravity, etc.

WTE_Galway
06-26-2006, 07:47 PM
a flat spin is close to unrecoverable in many planes


now the INVERTED flat spin .. that one is really nasty