PDA

View Full Version : ot.."How to speak like an american"



stalkervision
09-23-2007, 07:18 AM
funny video.. and yes I am an american! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

http://www.slatev.com/player.html?id=1184473562

"Do you have any little bottle of water,mate?"

I love studying people's accents... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

The difference between a person from Boston's speech and a person from NYC is really interesting for people who like silly little differences in speech like me..

stalkervision
09-23-2007, 07:18 AM
funny video.. and yes I am an american! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

http://www.slatev.com/player.html?id=1184473562

"Do you have any little bottle of water,mate?"

I love studying people's accents... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

The difference between a person from Boston's speech and a person from NYC is really interesting for people who like silly little differences in speech like me..

VW-IceFire
09-23-2007, 08:03 AM
Me too...love studying the way people say things. For a long time I was pretty confused on accents when I'd watch TV because everyone seemed to sound like the way I talk on primetime TV. Apparently the reason for that is because many actors and newscasters are either from Canada or come here to study the way we talk (particularly southern Ontario). Apparently we're the most neutral accent between the various accents in the UK and the various accents in the US. That said people in the southern US states still seem to have difficulty http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

(I think we annunciate too much)

Can anyone back that up? I've heard a few people say things about that but I'm not 100% sure.

Von_Rat
09-23-2007, 08:09 AM
the way i understand it, is that on american tv, and when they teach american english, they use the upper midwest accent.

it seems to me that the southern ontario accent is much like the us upper midwest. ive been to s ontario, but that so long ago i dont trust my memory.

SeaFireLIV
09-23-2007, 08:21 AM
For the longest time I got so confused by American words from films/series on TV. Took me ages to figure out several words like...

`Buoy` and `Aluminium` and `Missile, etc.`

"It`s `boy` not booey!" LOL. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

`Liquer` was one of the most confusing. i actually thought it was the word they used to insult black people. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif Didn`t realise they meant `alcohol`.

The first time I went online and had to play alongside americans it took me 2 weeks to finally get used to the southern drawl. Normal american speak was not the clear American I was expecting off TV programs, but sometimes pretty hard to make out. Guess I picked a southern state or something.

Then I got used to it. A bit like how I got used to the Scottish accent... but then my boss at work was scottish so i had to start understanding fast! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Copperhead311th
09-23-2007, 08:37 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by VW-IceFire:
Me too...love studying the way people say things. For a long time I was pretty confused on accents when I'd watch TV because everyone seemed to sound like the way I talk on primetime TV. Apparently the reason for that is because many actors and newscasters are either from Canada or come here to study the way we talk (particularly southern Ontario). Apparently we're the most neutral accent between the various accents in the UK and the various accents in the US. That said people in the southern US states still seem to have difficulty http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

(I think we annunciate too much)

Can anyone back that up? I've heard a few people say things about that but I'm not 100% sure. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

No No No. ya'll get it straight now. Everyone here in the south talks normal. It's the rest of you that have an accent.

But what's funny is this.
I lived in N. Central California for over a year and a half. When i cam home everyone here was like..wow where'd that accent come from. Aperantly i had lost my lovey southern drawl. So i can now, or used to drop the southern drawl at will. havn't tried in a long while though.

-HH-Quazi
09-23-2007, 08:42 AM
I think my British m8s get a kick out of my American Southern accent. And I in turn enjoy their accents. I notice that even though they are all living on the same island, that there are subtle differences in their speech\accent(s). But what I really enjoy the most is learning what certain words mean. I also have a Scottish m8 or two as well in the K9 fold that I enjoy speaking & listening too. And a m8 or two from Belgium. It's great.

Copperhead311th
09-23-2007, 08:46 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by SeaFireLIV:
For the longest time I got so confused by American words from films/series on TV. Took me ages to figure out several words like...

`Buoy` and `Aluminium` and `Missile, etc.`

"It`s `boy` not booey!" LOL. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

`Liquer` was one of the most confusing. i actually thought it was the word they used to insult black people. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif Didn`t realise they meant `alcohol`.

The first time I went online and had to play alongside americans it took me 2 weeks to finally get used to the southern drawl. Normal american speak was not the clear American I was expecting off TV programs, but sometimes pretty hard to make out. Guess I picked a southern state or something.

Then I got used to it. A bit like how I got used to the Scottish accent... but then my boss at work was scottish so i had to start understanding fast! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

lol where do you think the Southern Drawl came from. Like most southerners my ancestores are Scots/Irish with a little native american thrown in. When the Scots settled in the new world...for some reason they mostly migrated south. As did a lot of the Irish. but not so much the Irsh as did the Scots.Both the Scots Brouge and Southern Drawl are 2 very distict accents. which surprisingly have the same origins.

Monterey13
09-23-2007, 08:46 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> That said people in the southern US states still seem to have difficulty http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Difficulty with what? I have a very southern accent, but I speak just fine. Noone ever has a problem understanding me. If you want to hear a funny accent, just go to Maine. I spent two winters up there while I was in the Navy, and their "r"s take some getting used to.

Even the newscasters here have no accent at all. I have spoken to a few about their speech, and they told me that they go through heavy speech training do drop any kind of accent. This happens everywhere, not just in the south.

SeaFireLIV
09-23-2007, 08:51 AM
Well, in my experience the US love the English accent, the more `English` it sounds, the better. On my side it was embarrassing say, "Excuse me? Sorry? please say again."

Oh and Americans appear to love our `quaint` polite ways as well, like saying thankyou or sorry all the time. Of course, I`ve come across some who seem to hate the english accent, seeing it as `pompous`.

What do I like about the American accent... well, it sounds a bit more `dynamic` if you see what I mean.

It`s funny really how much difference an accent makes on people`s view of you, even in your own country.

-HH-Quazi
09-23-2007, 08:56 AM
Yea. I am one that like the British accent & there use and meaning(s) of certain words.

Copperhead311th
09-23-2007, 08:57 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Monterey13:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> That said people in the southern US states still seem to have difficulty http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Difficulty with what? I have a very southern accent, but I speak just fine. Noone ever has a problem understanding me. If you want to hear a funny accent, just go to Maine. I spent two winters up there while I was in the Navy, and their "r"s take some getting used to.

Even the newscasters here have no accent at all. I have spoken to a few about their speech, and they told me that they go through heavy speech training do drop any kind of accent. This happens everywhere, not just in the south. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yeah i agree Monterey. I too thought that was a back handed comment. Ya know ppl think Jeff Foxworthy is joking when he says that "when people hear a southern accent they automatically deduct 10 IQ points right off the top." I found that to be very much the truth when i lived out west in California & Colorado.
And thenthere is always the stupid misconception that we're (southerners) Racists or skinheads. now that REALLY got on my nerves.
Sadly i actually had to beat one guys *** over it at a bar (Pub)in Tracy, California one night.
So People...we're not stupid, we're not inbreed, we're not rednecks, we're not all racists, we're just good folks....and we're southern....so that means by the grace of the good Lord on High...we're better than you. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif

triad773
09-23-2007, 09:06 AM
Great thread- really like accents myself. From US- half Yankee half Rebel http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Enjoy the Brit accent in its different flavours as well. My wife, being an editor and fond of language and literature, I can get under her skin excessively quick: all I have to do is a quote from Wm Shakespeare in a Cockney accent! She gets mad, saying 'it's sacrilege!' But I say Hon- what's a matter? Michael Caine's cockney you know.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif

MEGILE
09-23-2007, 09:15 AM
LOL Shakespeare in cockney.

It's like Henry VIII played by Ray Winstone http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif

"Awight dear sur, Im gonna fack thou up"!

To the Brits, the Southern Accents of the US really are great, because they are so strong I think.

VW-IceFire
09-23-2007, 09:38 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Monterey13:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> That said people in the southern US states still seem to have difficulty http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Difficulty with what? I have a very southern accent, but I speak just fine. Noone ever has a problem understanding me. If you want to hear a funny accent, just go to Maine. I spent two winters up there while I was in the Navy, and their "r"s take some getting used to.

Even the newscasters here have no accent at all. I have spoken to a few about their speech, and they told me that they go through heavy speech training do drop any kind of accent. This happens everywhere, not just in the south. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Difficulty with the Canadian accent. Most people in the south are very friendly and happy to help when we ask for directions or we're in a store looking for something...never had a problem with that. But occasionally they just stare at us after one of my family says something and they just aren't sure what language we're speaking. Not sure why that is...nobody in my family mumbles. We're sort of loud actually http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Monterey13
09-23-2007, 09:42 AM
The only word I have heard in Canadian that sounds weird to me is...about...Canadians make it sound like....aboot.

ploughman
09-23-2007, 10:09 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Copperhead311th:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by SeaFireLIV:
For the longest time I got so confused by American words from films/series on TV. Took me ages to figure out several words like...

`Buoy` and `Aluminium` and `Missile, etc.`

"It`s `boy` not booey!" LOL. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

`Liquer` was one of the most confusing. i actually thought it was the word they used to insult black people. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif Didn`t realise they meant `alcohol`.

The first time I went online and had to play alongside americans it took me 2 weeks to finally get used to the southern drawl. Normal american speak was not the clear American I was expecting off TV programs, but sometimes pretty hard to make out. Guess I picked a southern state or something.

Then I got used to it. A bit like how I got used to the Scottish accent... but then my boss at work was scottish so i had to start understanding fast! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

lol where do you think the Southern Drawl came from. Like most southerners my ancestores are Scots/Irish with a little native american thrown in. When the Scots settled in the new world...for some reason they mostly migrated south. As did a lot of the Irish. but not so much the Irsh as did the Scots.Both the Scots Brouge and Southern Drawl are 2 very distict accents. which surprisingly have the same origins. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I was down the pub today having a jar and there were four old giffers on another table and I pretty much immediately clocked them as Southern US, figured they were most likely vets doing a tour of their old stomping grounds. After about 1/2 an hour I realised they weren't Southern US at all but just locals with a thick rural west country accent. Never really occurred to me how similar a southern drawl and a west country "whar" sound before.

ImMoreBetter
09-23-2007, 10:14 AM
I'll admit, I've met less than three British accented people that I can understand 100% of the time.

Viper2005_
09-23-2007, 10:45 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by -HH-Quazi:I notice that even though they are all living on the same island, that there are <span class="ev_code_red">subtle</span> differences in their speech\accent(s). </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Somebody hasn't been to Newcastle... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Rjel
09-23-2007, 10:58 AM
I have to wonder if regional accents won't start to disappear in a few generations? With the influence of mass media and how people move more frequently to different parts of their respective countries, if accents don't disappear, I'd think they'd become less pronounced.

R_Target
09-23-2007, 11:26 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Ploughman:
I was down the pub today having a jar and there were four old giffers on another table and I pretty much immediately clocked them as Southern US, figured they were most likely vets doing a tour of their old stomping grounds. After about 1/2 an hour I realised they weren't Southern US at all but just locals with a thick rural west country accent. Never really occurred to me how similar a southern drawl and a west country "whar" sound before. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

You should hear some of the duffers on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. They sound like they never left England.

Warrington_Wolf
09-23-2007, 11:33 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by -HH-Quazi:
I think my British m8s get a kick out of my American Southern accent. And I in turn enjoy their accents. I notice that even though they are all living on the same island, that there are subtle differences in their speech\accent(s). But what I really enjoy the most is learning what certain words mean. I also have a Scottish m8 or two as well in the K9 fold that I enjoy speaking & listening too. And a m8 or two from Belgium. It's great. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Subtle differences??? I can get on the motorway for less than half an hour and go to either Leigh or Wigan and they may as well be speaking Chinese.

MEGILE
09-23-2007, 12:46 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by R_Target:


You should hear some of the duffers on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. They sound like they never left England. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

O'RLY? I'm intrigued. Got audio/video?

berg417448
09-23-2007, 01:29 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Rjel:
I have to wonder if regional accents won't start to disappear in a few generations? With the influence of mass media and how people move more frequently to different parts of their respective countries, if accents don't disappear, I'd think they'd become less pronounced. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

That has been happening in some parts of the USA. There was a PBS show on last year that dealt with language in the USA and one of the things discussed was the disappearance of the old Appalachian accents due to outside influences.


That said, there are still real differences in the "southern accent". For example, people from east Tennessee have a very different accent than those from southern Mississippi.

R_Target
09-23-2007, 02:17 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Megile:
O'RLY? I'm intrigued. Got audio/video? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Nah, wish I did. I worked in a fish market when I was a young feller, and met some old crab fishermen with this distinctive accent. A lot of it is disappearing since the Chesapeake bay bridges opened up in the 50's and 60's. It used to be totally isolated.

horseback
09-23-2007, 08:40 PM
American regional accents are starting to disappear because we are so mobile as a people. Living in SoCal, it is rare to meet someone over forty originally from Southern california (I think they all sold their houses and took the huge profits to retire in Tennessee or Wyoming). The formerly sparsely settled western states have been inundated with Easterners (people from east of the Rockies/Great Plains area and parts of Texas), and their regional accents have largely disappeared.

While working in Georgia this summer, a lot of the people I dealt with were natives of the area, with an accent you could cut with a knife. But a large and growing minority were from the North or Midwest, and you could see their influence in the locals' speech as well. Generally, you'll find a strong local accent where there is a strong enough local economy or a cultural pull strong enough to keep the kids in the area.

When I was in Britain in the early '60s, nobody moved far from their old neighborhoods, much less their hometowns, so there were very distinctive dialects in what seemed like close proximity (to us Yanks). I remember my playmates in Ipswich being shocked that my cousins lived in Akron Ohio, La Hunta Colorado, and Phoenix, Arizona. Their aunts, uncles, cousins, nans, and gramps all lived within 10 miles of each other. It sounds like that's changing now.

cheers

horseback

-HH-Quazi
09-23-2007, 09:54 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by R_Target:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Ploughman:
I was down the pub today having a jar and there were four old giffers on another table and I pretty much immediately clocked them as Southern US, figured they were most likely vets doing a tour of their old stomping grounds. After about 1/2 an hour I realised they weren't Southern US at all but just locals with a thick rural west country accent. Never really occurred to me how similar a southern drawl and a west country "whar" sound before. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

You should hear some of the duffers on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. They sound like they never left England. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>"Duffers"? You see, another one of those words. HEHE Really neat imho. Silly on my part though, but neat.

HerrGraf
09-23-2007, 10:04 PM
I don't think Copperhead and Monterey are real Southerners- I have not heard either one of them say "youall" once. To talk "Southern" you need to talk real slowlike and drawwwl out your words while saying "youall" every time the speaker means "you".

A western Canadian accent is easy too. Just put an "aye" at the end of your sentence.
How do you spell Canada? C aye N aye D aye.

By the way Copperhead, I am quite familiar with Tracy CA and when you were there it was probably still a little backwater village. Not that way anymore. It's getting just too crowded here in Kalifornia.

berg417448
09-23-2007, 10:08 PM
No one in the south says "youall". It is "y'all"!http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

luftluuver
09-23-2007, 11:04 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by HerrGraf:
A western Canadian accent is easy too. Just put an "aye" at the end of your sentence.
How do you spell Canada? C aye N aye D aye. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>I didn't know I had moved some 1-2000 or so miles. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Breeze147
09-24-2007, 06:38 AM
I have been told several times that I have a very distinctive Philadelphia accent.

ViktorViktor
09-24-2007, 06:56 AM
Don't worry, we won't hold it against you.
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

JarheadEd
09-24-2007, 07:18 AM
Having lived in Ohio, Iowa, Tennessee, and Florida, all before the age of 10, I have gotten some weird looks from people in the past due to my mish-mash poly-accent. With a lot of "Where are you from?"

My wife says it's no where near as bad as it used to be. To me I never notice the difference. Go figure.

CH47D
09-24-2007, 08:52 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by berg417448:
For example, people from east Tennessee have a very different accent than those from southern Mississippi. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

You can take it a notch further than that. I grew up in Central Mississippi, spent many years in the Army but moved back to Northeastern Mississippi. Believe it or not even in the same state accents are different, when I first moved to the NE end I thought I was going to need an interpreter for the first few months. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif I never realized in this state we had an area with an Appalachian accent.

sgilewicz
09-24-2007, 10:57 AM
Copperhead from your sig I take it you are a Crimson Tide alumnus. My dad (born and raised in northern New Jersey) graduated from UA in '54 with a degree in metalurgical engineering. He married my Mom (born in Kentucky and raised in Tuscaloosa) when he graduated. After doing a stint as an officer in the Army Corps of Engineers, he brought her up to northern NJ and started a family.

We were the only kids on the block that heard "Y'all git yore britches in here 'fore I blister 'em raw" at dinner time when we would dawdle too long outside! I've been back down to Alabama many times and really enjoy the people (maybe because my mom drilled "southern" courtesy into us!). Great folks, even if they speak a bit odd http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

M_Gunz
09-24-2007, 11:09 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Copperhead311th:
When the Scots settled in the new world...for some reason they mostly migrated south. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

You might want to check where Nova Scotia is on a map sometime. Also New Brunswick.
A lot of Scots went to Canada and the Northern States.

There was one colony, Georgia, that was a penal colony. They emptied the prisons out into
indentured slavery in Georgia. And there were a lot of everyone in that lot.

I can imagine that a lot of groups wanted to avoid the Puritans though.

M_Gunz
09-24-2007, 11:13 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Breeze147:
I have been told several times that I have a very distinctive Philadelphia accent. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yeah but what neighborhood? LOL! Get me a steak down on Catherine, willya?

poymando
09-24-2007, 11:32 AM
Baltimore has an unusual accent..
Check out this very interesting project:
http://polyglot.lss.wisc.edu/dare/dare.html

triad773
09-24-2007, 12:18 PM
I've heard there is a Chicago (Shee-kah-goe') accent, but I've never been accused of being from here. Funny when I moved to So. Cal, in the early 80's I picked up that accent pretty quickly from hanging around with some surfer types.

I think mass media has had much to do with the obliteration of localities and their respective distinctions with speech. It's too bad I think as it was a difference that made each region unique.

I remember visiting a grandma in Piedmont, AL in the 70's and the newscasters had accents so think you could walk on them. Now days when I see a snippet of newscast from down that way you can't tell where they're from. Prolly a network television initiative of some sort. I remember when Ted Turner rolled out CNN- they broadcast from Atlanta, but you'd never be able to tell it from lack of any distinctive accent.

Von_Rat
09-24-2007, 12:24 PM
im originally from chicago. i now live in southern illinois. theres been many many times when people have heard me speak and the 1st thing they say is,, "your from chicago aint you".

triad773
09-24-2007, 12:27 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Von_Rat:
im originally from chicago. i now live in southern illinois. theres been many many times when people have heard me speak and the 1st thing they say is,, "your from chicago aint you". </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

LOL Von_Rat! Yes I've known some folks from Cairo (or as they call it- Kay-roh) and its pretty surprising to me how different the accents are down there. I understand that during the Civil War many down that way considered themselves Southerners.

Little_Walt
09-24-2007, 12:30 PM
I served in the US Army in Berlin during the mid- to late- seventies, working as a translator. One of my most interesting off-duty experience was translating English to English. No joke.

I had a friend, a US lieutenant, from East Tennessee. I had another friend, a British corporal in the RMP, who referred to himself as a "geordie" (I forget just what that means in terms of where he's from, but the accent sounded not-quite-Scots to my untutored ears). We had both of them over once for an evening at our off-post apartment. The Brit understood the Tennesseean about one word in three, and the Tennessean understood the Brit about one word in five. They both made perfect sense to me, so ... I translated. Seriously.

Damnedest thing.

S!

Little Walt

MEGILE
09-24-2007, 12:35 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Little_Walt:

"geordie" </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Newcastle.

Funnily enough most of the UK has trouble enough trying to understand them.

snafu73
09-24-2007, 12:53 PM
Is there anything worse than a cockney saying football?

"Fatbaw"

TheGozr
09-24-2007, 12:58 PM
Copperhead311th where do you leave?

I love to go in the south and speak to the peoples with my French accent and .. well I love their reactions

Breeze147
09-24-2007, 01:15 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by M_Gunz:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Breeze147:
I have been told several times that I have a very distinctive Philadelphia accent. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yeah but what neighborhood? LOL! Get me a steak down on Catherine, willya? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Up Roxber. Yo, jeet yet? Gotta go down ta Geno's. Get one wid. Ride back up ta Skookill. See ya down da shore.

luftluuver
09-24-2007, 03:10 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by TheGozr:
Copperhead311th where do you leave?

I love to go in the south and speak to the peoples with my French accent and .. well I love their reactions </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Between the cajuns and the Quebecers, French is not some strange accent in English.

-HH-Quazi
09-24-2007, 03:41 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by berg417448:
That said, there are still real differences in the "southern accent". For example, people from east Tennessee have a very different accent than those from southern Mississippi. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>I know I moved from upper east TN (Tri-Cities) to Nashville which is middle of the state and people could tell I was an east TN transplant. Now I can talk with my sister over the phone & can really hear the east TN accent. Strange how in the deep south of the US you can get so much difference in accents from state to state. I mean the difference between Georgia & Alabama is like night & day. Strangely, Floridians don't have as much of a southern accent as any of the other southern states.

berg417448
09-24-2007, 03:45 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by -HH-Quazi:
Strangely, Floridians don't have as much of a southern accent as any of the other southern states. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

That's because so many of the residents of Florida are from New york! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

I heard a conversation once in which a girl from Miami told her friend, "Miami is about as far south as New York City".

slo_1_2_3
09-24-2007, 08:47 PM
I aint got none bad granner

mortoma
09-24-2007, 09:03 PM
I like our American english better. Every time I hear the word 'Schedule' pronounced by Brits or Aussies 'shedule', I go ape!! This is not what I learned in 'shool' when I was a child. But in the 'sheme' of things, what do I know??? Is there something about the pronunciation of a hard 'C' that British have difficulty with??

ploughman
09-25-2007, 02:37 AM
Not at all, there are several words we pronounce with a hard "c". http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Philipscdrw
09-25-2007, 04:41 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by mortoma:
I like our American english better. Every time I hear the word 'Schedule' pronounced by Brits or Aussies 'shedule', I go ape!! This is not what I learned in 'shool' when I was a child. But in the 'sheme' of things, what do I know??? Is there something about the pronunciation of a hard 'C' that British have difficulty with?? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Heh, I'd always pronounced it 'skedule' until I heard it pronounced as 'shedule' by the automated train announcer at Wimbledon station, a few months ago. Was mildly mortified to think I'd been mispronouncing the word for years - I read words a lot more than I hear them, so this happens fairly often!

I would guess that 'schedule' comes from French or German, where 'sch-' has a soft 'c'.

If we really want standard pronunciation, all we need to do is have a bloody revolution and form the United Soviet States of Europe and America, and let the totalitarian government 'modernise' the language by pruning unnecessary letters from the alphabet and changing the spelling of all words so every letter is always pronounced the same way.

M_Gunz
09-25-2007, 05:15 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Breeze147:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by M_Gunz:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Breeze147:
I have been told several times that I have a very distinctive Philadelphia accent. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yeah but what neighborhood? LOL! Get me a steak down on Catherine, willya? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Up Roxber. Yo, jeet yet? Gotta go down ta Geno's. Get one wid. Ride back up ta Skookill. See ya down da shore. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I lived up the skuke in King of Prussia and Bridgeport on and off maybe 15 years.
Went to HS there till 75.
You don't find the best steaks outside Philly much, nobody else puts the sauce in the grill.
I'd run down to Pats before but in Bridgeport there's Franzones to save the trip.
Actually there's some good spots all out along the Main Line as well but the best are in Philly
and probably stay, it's the neighborhoods.

Roxboro I dunno except seeing the name.

I've transplanted to Steeler Country where they have some idea of what a steak should be but
don't go the whole way. OTOH there's a number of local treats. We don't have much of those
truck-restaurants here where you can get a good steak cheap. Only ones here are in Oakland
where there's 90% students (maybe) and they're all in one spot. Perhaps it's too spread out
for those here and too few people. After all, dis ain't Philly!

Funny though how Pilly-ese and Pittsburgh-ese do share so many expressions like jeet.
They sell shirts here with a bunch of it. But there is something I miss really bad and that
is WMMR. Maybe that's changed too, Pierre Robert is working for XM for one.

MEGILE
09-25-2007, 06:08 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by mortoma:
Is there something about the pronunciation of a hard 'C' that British have difficulty with?? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

For the record I say sKedule.

stalkervision
09-25-2007, 06:12 AM
How about it's being pronounced "Shed-ULL" .. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

MEGILE
09-25-2007, 06:14 AM
aloominum toob.

leesure time.

Learn to speak, noobs.

Breeze147
09-25-2007, 06:16 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by M_Gunz:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Breeze147:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by M_Gunz:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Breeze147:
I have been told several times that I have a very distinctive Philadelphia accent. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yeah but what neighborhood? LOL! Get me a steak down on Catherine, willya? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Up Roxber. Yo, jeet yet? Gotta go down ta Geno's. Get one wid. Ride back up ta Skookill. See ya down da shore. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I lived up the skuke in King of Prussia and Bridgeport on and off maybe 15 years.
Went to HS there till 75.
You don't find the best steaks outside Philly much, nobody else puts the sauce in the grill.
I'd run down to Pats before but in Bridgeport there's Franzones to save the trip.
Actually there's some good spots all out along the Main Line as well but the best are in Philly
and probably stay, it's the neighborhoods.

Roxboro I dunno except seeing the name.

I've transplanted to Steeler Country where they have some idea of what a steak should be but
don't go the whole way. OTOH there's a number of local treats. We don't have much of those
truck-restaurants here where you can get a good steak cheap. Only ones here are in Oakland
where there's 90% students (maybe) and they're all in one spot. Perhaps it's too spread out
for those here and too few people. After all, dis ain't Philly!

Funny though how Pilly-ese and Pittsburgh-ese do share so many expressions like jeet.
They sell shirts here with a bunch of it. But there is something I miss really bad and that
is WMMR. Maybe that's changed too, Pierre Robert is working for XM for one. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
I have actually met Pierre Robert on several occasions during the mid to late '80's when I used to go to 23 East, Chestnut Cabaret, et al.
I doubt that any other city has a character quite like him.

I once passed out drunk face first into a plate of spaghetti and meatballs in Franzone's.

Next time your up that way, try D'Alessandro's on Henry Ave. in Roxborough for a steak. Right across the street is Chubby's, which is also pretty good but is somewhat of a dive.

Messaschnitzel
09-25-2007, 03:13 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Copperhead311th:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Monterey13:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> That said people in the southern US states still seem to have difficulty http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Difficulty with what? I have a very southern accent, but I speak just fine. Noone ever has a problem understanding me. If you want to hear a funny accent, just go to Maine. I spent two winters up there while I was in the Navy, and their "r"s take some getting used to.

Even the newscasters here have no accent at all. I have spoken to a few about their speech, and they told me that they go through heavy speech training do drop any kind of accent. This happens everywhere, not just in the south. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yeah i agree Monterey. I too thought that was a back handed comment. Ya know ppl think Jeff Foxworthy is joking when he says that "when people hear a southern accent they automatically deduct 10 IQ points right off the top." I found that to be very much the truth when i lived out west in California & Colorado.
And thenthere is always the stupid misconception that we're (southerners) Racists or skinheads. now that REALLY got on my nerves.
Sadly i actually had to beat one guys *** over it at a bar (Pub)in Tracy, California one night.
So People...we're not stupid, we're not inbreed, we're not rednecks, we're not all racists, we're just good folks....and we're southern....so that means by the grace of the good Lord on High...we're better than you. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Copperhead311th:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Monterey13:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> That said people in the southern US states still seem to have difficulty http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Difficulty with what? I have a very southern accent, but I speak just fine. Noone ever has a problem understanding me. If you want to hear a funny accent, just go to Maine. I spent two winters up there while I was in the Navy, and their "r"s take some getting used to.

Even the newscasters here have no accent at all. I have spoken to a few about their speech, and they told me that they go through heavy speech training do drop any kind of accent. This happens everywhere, not just in the south. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yeah i agree Monterey. I too thought that was a back handed comment. Ya know ppl think Jeff Foxworthy is joking when he says that "when people hear a southern accent they automatically deduct 10 IQ points right off the top." I found that to be very much the truth when i lived out west in California & Colorado.
And thenthere is always the stupid misconception that we're (southerners) Racists or skinheads. now that REALLY got on my nerves.
Sadly i actually had to beat one guys *** over it at a bar (Pub)in Tracy, California one night.
So People...we're not stupid, we're not inbreed, we're not rednecks, we're not all racists, we're just good folks....and we're southern....so that means by the grace of the good Lord on High...we're better than you. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I moved to N. California from East Texas when I was 16 after my parents died. I was on my own from that point on and I was in a tough spot trying to get a job because I sounded like a backwoods pirogue-paddler. You are right about the misconceptions upon hearing a Southern accent. Folks will think of Ernest P. Worrell, or Sheriff J.W. Pepper and treat you accordingly, which is why I learned to speak like I am from Nowhere, U.S.A.

I remember answering a want ad back then for someone to take care of their horses. These people were rather well-to-do and were from Maine. Understand that until that moment, I never heard a Maine accent in my life. Compound this with the problem that the woman that I was speaking to never heard an accent like mine before either. Communication was troublesome, to say the least.

Another time I was speaking to someone, and I asked her where she lived. Speaking very slowly, she said in a voice that is usually reserved for children or to someone who does not understand the language well: "I live in a town that is very far from here." Thinking it was probably someplace like Los Angeles, I replied, "where is that?" She said, "You probably haven't heard of it before. It is a place called San Anselmo." I then said, "I know where it is. I go to high school there." She looked astonished. I couldn't believe the next thing that came out of her mouth. She said, "You do? You go to school?"

Aw det teim Ah didn noe Ah wuz det dum. Ah beter git awn det nollege bahsikle en stert pedlin wit awl ah gots!

Pie ar rownd not skwer. Iny dumshet noze det if they noze mat'matix heer en Texiz en Looziena.

-I kid you not, I really did sound like that when I left Texas and Louisiana. It starts to bleed through on occasion when I am really happy or angry. I have to admit that it does sound funny hearing them when I call the friends and relatives I have left back home.

slo_1_2_3
09-25-2007, 07:49 PM
Heh , you think that's bad? Have you ever heard a true cajun from louisianna? You'll think they're making it up as they go.

Copperhead311th
09-25-2007, 09:49 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by sgilewicz:
Copperhead from your sig I take it you are a Crimson Tide alumnus. My dad (born and raised in northern New Jersey) graduated from UA in '54 with a degree in metalurgical engineering. He married my Mom (born in Kentucky and raised in Tuscaloosa) when he graduated. After doing a stint as an officer in the Army Corps of Engineers, he brought her up to northern NJ and started a family.

We were the only kids on the block that heard "Y'all git yore britches in here 'fore I blister 'em raw" at dinner time when we would dawdle too long outside! I've been back down to Alabama many times and really enjoy the people (maybe because my mom drilled "southern" courtesy into us!). Great folks, even if they speak a bit odd http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Wow that's cool. Seems UA grads are everywhere.
evey Hyppie counter cultur guru Timothy Leary was a UA grad.
But me an Allumni haha that's a good one. lol i wish. I'm just a big supporter of the UA's Altheltics Dept. But thanks for he complament.
I am hoping my daughter get that honor however.

Copperhead311th
09-25-2007, 09:53 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by TheGozr:
Copperhead311th where do you leave?

I love to go in the south and speak to the peoples with my French accent and .. well I love their reactions </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Check the sig. lol
and i imangine it's tha same reaction i got in California & Colorado. Hey you sound like Elvis or worse.."hey you sound like Foreest Gump....RUN FOREST RUN!" http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Copperhead311th
09-25-2007, 10:46 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by HerrGraf:
I don't think Copperhead and Monterey are real Southerners- I have not heard either one of them say "youall" once. To talk "Southern" you need to talk real slowlike and drawwwl out your words while saying "youall" every time the speaker means "you".

A western Canadian accent is easy too. Just put an "aye" at the end of your sentence.
How do you spell Canada? C aye N aye D aye.

By the way Copperhead, I am quite familiar with Tracy CA and when you were there it was probably still a little backwater village. Not that way anymore. It's getting just too crowded here in Kalifornia. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Like Berg says.. it's not "YOU ALL" it "Ya'll."
and you've obviously never heard me on Warclouds Teamspeak have you? lol If you had you'ld understand how wrong you truly are in that asumption. lol.
is it becuase i don't really write like a southerner would speak? well here let me help all off you out with a little lesson.

Copperheads guide to Speaking Southern.

Ya'll = you all. As in: "ya'll going to the store latter?"

Here are some words you may hear wile traveling in the south.

Gimmie = Give me

Sum = SOME pronounced as SUM as in the sum of a mathimatical problem

Dim = Them: pronounced as in" to "dim" a light bulb.

Dar = there: Pronounced as in I DARE you to hit me.

Tatter: a potato

Ya = you. pronounced as "ahh i'm from Sweeden YA!"

Beach= B*tch- a female dog Pronounced as in" hey we're going swimming at the beach."

now lets try and make a sentance out of all the cool new words we've just learned!

Read the following line aloud:

hey man, gimme sum dim dare tatter chips ya sum beach!

Wow you've just learned to speak southern!

now see if you can come up with a few new used for those words on your own. lol

Monterey13
09-26-2007, 04:14 PM
you forgot.....I'm fittin to go down to da store.

Copperhead311th
09-26-2007, 04:29 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Monterey13:
you forgot.....I'm fittin to go down to da store. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

yup i shore did. lol
fittin or fixin to: about to do something or go some where.

goinair: go in there & get me another beer.

a spell. A shot amount of time. could be 10 mins...could be 2 hours. depends on who your talking about.

hey where ya'll/ you going latter on. A strictly retorical question. Asked so the person asking the question know your where abouts latter so he may avoid you. everyone know what it means. so you usual response is..... Somewhere you ain't. (used with a harsh tone)

Monterey13
09-26-2007, 04:36 PM
Ah reckon dem folks is jist gonna hafta put up wid us hicks...hehe


Copper, here's my son...I'll give him 6 months 'til he comes back home...lol
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i274/13thAFMonterey/0809071755.jpg

Choctaw111
09-26-2007, 04:50 PM
I fly with an English squadron and I also had the privilege to work hand in hand with the English Army when I was in the Army. Of course I picked up on a few words and phrases from them. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif My former speech teacher was horrified at their accent and thought they butchered the English language. Where does she think the English language came from anyway? I think the way they talk is the bees knees.

HerrGraf
09-26-2007, 10:36 PM
Well Copperhead. took you long enough to respond. Sorry to misspell "ya'll" but Southern is a second language to me.

Like you know dude that like spelling can be sooo hard sometimes. Fershure!

You are right that I have never heard you (or anyone else) speak on Teamspeak because I prefer to be dragging pegs up a tight mountain road than online. Each to thier own.

Out on the left coast you have to be multilingual because of all the individuals who use English (of any variation) as a second or even third language, so can't master them all.

No Cervesa, no trabajos!

ImMoreBetter
09-26-2007, 10:54 PM
Pop &gt; Soda.

Yes?

Copperhead311th
09-27-2007, 10:02 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by ImMoreBetter:
Pop &gt; Soda.

Yes? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yep. but down here..it's just called "A Coke"
Dosent matter what the flavor or brand is. it's all called a coke. this is another very regionla thing. up north they call it a a pop. out west a soda. down south it's a coke.

example in the south.
"Hey ya'll i'm goin in to pay for this gas...ya wanna coke or sumthin?"
Reply: "ummmm yeah man ....git me an ORANGE."

now by ORANGE it is generaly understood that you are to resturn with an orange flavord soda.
Usualy a Nehi or a Fanta.

the thing that hasn't been touched on yet in this topic is the subltties of language. Somethings are understood without haveing to be spoken or with further instructions.

when the guy above asked for an orngesoda. it is gernerally understood that unless he specifies a spacific brand of orange soda..he will get just any old orange soada. Nehi & Fanat just hapen to be the most previlent brands of orange soada.

now lets all walk down to the corner for an RC & a Moon Pie. they're shoot'n marbles down there. ;-)
lol

Copperhead311th
09-27-2007, 10:09 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Monterey13:
Ah reckon dem folks is jist gonna hafta put up wid us hicks...hehe


Copper, here's my son...I'll give him 6 months 'til he comes back home...lol
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i274/13thAFMonterey/0809071755.jpg </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

lol are serious? well he's defantly got the summer atire down pat. Blue jeans, flip flops & no shirt. he's in like Flynn.
Is he living here now or was that taken just passing through? and where was that pic taken. it seems familier. Reminds me of the Confederate Cemertary & Memorial up in Maubry Al. (about 35-40 miles from Montgomery)

M_Gunz
09-27-2007, 10:58 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Copperhead311th:
up north they call it a a pop. out west a soda. down south it's a coke. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Up north it varies from state to state as do accents. And down south I've been where coke is
pronounced RC, thank yew. I sure don't expect people in Dallas to sound the same as Austin
let alone from Alabama. I've known northern Californians and southern Californians that
sounded different. The accent in northern Maine is closer to some midwest than Bangor which
there and the coast is very distinctive but still not like Boston. NYC has different accents
and words by neighborhood, people from them know, as does Philly and in Pittsburgh you can
cross a river and some words differ. Some of Ohio speaks like Wheeling and other parts are
like watching TV.

Sorry but after many years of travel just inside the continental borders there's no way I
can generalize even by state let alone regions. WTH, I've been told by Italians that one
town to the next in Italy some people have a hard time following what is being said but
then those guys talked caffeine-fast.

The more people who have immigrated in the past 100-odd years and stayed together, the more
different accents and words you get and really the more interesting the place becomes -- esp
the food -- or at least that holds for a few cities I've known.

knug421
09-27-2007, 02:33 PM
As a cab driver in Panama City Beach, Florida, I get to hear accents from every part of the world. It's extremely interesting and I've had to learn how to listen better because some of the English dialects that come through here are amazingly difficult to decipher. I have lived in the south the majority of my life, yet I have been told I have a news anchor accent. (probably because I lived in south Florida, which is not the 'south', and lived my first few years overseas in Germany and Italy as an Armybrat).

The most common accent I get here of course is the southern drawl. However for every state there are subtle (sometimes not so subtle) differences. For example I can tell if someone grew up close to Alabama versus Georgia, and Virginia versus Texas. The Texan accent I think is the most easy for non-Americans to hear, it seems a little more open than some of the 'deep south' accents. In fact I picked up one guy from Georgia who had a drawl so thick that I could not understand him at all.

The most interesting American/English accents I get are from Minnesota, Canada, Louisiana, and Maine.

I also think by far the sexiest female southern accent I've heard so far is west Virginia/North Carolina, with Georgia in close second.

What surprises me the most though is English accents from across the pond. There seem to be so many for such a small island, and so varied it's a wonder they came from the same language. There are some Brits who are easier to understand than my own countrymen, and there are others who might has well be speaking Chinese. I've even talked to Brits in which I could not tell that they even had an accent after conversing with them for a while. There are a few words specifically that make me chuckle when Listening to Brits (on BBC mostly)

Schedule (the C is silent)
weekend (the emphasis is on 'end')
controversy (the emphasis on tro instead of con and said like con-TRAW-versee)

As far as non-native-English speakers trying to tell me where they want to go, Russians and Turks seem to be better able to muddle their way through the English language, while the Chinese (who I understand have a difficulty with the R sound),other Asians, and surprisingly, Mexicans, seem to have a much more difficult time speaking English. Although I must say many of the Mexicans I pick up probably do not have the same educational background as the other foreigners that come through my city.

Monterey13
09-27-2007, 10:11 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Copperhead311th:

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i274/13thAFMonterey/0809071755.jpg </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

lol are serious? well he's defantly got the summer atire down pat. Blue jeans, flip flops & no shirt. he's in like Flynn.
Is he living here now or was that taken just passing through? and where was that pic taken. it seems familier. Reminds me of the Confederate Cemertary & Memorial up in Maubry Al. (about 35-40 miles from Montgomery)[/QUOTE]

He is living in Bessemer. He took that photo on the way down when he moved. I don't know where it was at.

roybaty
09-28-2007, 05:04 PM
Wudya mean I talk funny, I have no idear what ya mean? What's this about us up here calling "soda" "pop".

I'm a Western Massachusetts native and NO WE DO NOT TALK LIKE BOSTONIANS, we just give 'em money to dig leaky holes in the ground http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

VW-IceFire
09-28-2007, 05:25 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Monterey13:
The only word I have heard in Canadian that sounds weird to me is...about...Canadians make it sound like....aboot. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Apparently only Americans can hear that. Something about how you expect the vowel sounds to come out and you don't hear the subtle bits. A linguist told me so I'm totally off the hook on this one http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

M_Gunz
09-28-2007, 08:02 PM
That's right, in New Brunswick it's closer to a-boat only a bit broader.

I had one friend visit home and he never stopped laughing about 'puddadas'.
I figure, you grow enough spuds you can call em what you want.

han freak solo
09-28-2007, 08:40 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Copperhead311th:
Yep. but down here..it's just called "A Coke"
Dosent matter what the flavor or brand is. it's all called a coke. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Born and raised in Texas I called all soda a Coke when I was young. I never could figure out why I never could get a Dr. Pepper when I really wanted a Dr. Pepper.

Once I grew up, it's all soda. Or, beer. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif

ViktorViktor
09-29-2007, 10:17 AM
I remember back when I was attending college I had a friend/classmate from central Texas who had some very colorful expressions.

He used to talk about 'spanking that bad puppy' when he wanted to put into effect a solution to a problem. For example if he wanted me to help him get his bicycle over to the bike shop for repairs:

'OK, let's go and spank that bad puppy.''

He also used to say 'pig out' when he referred to eating tasty food combinations.

For example, his reply if I suggested that we should eat a bag of M&Ms together with Miller beer.

'H#ll yeah, let's pig out !'

Anybody else out there know any local American expressions ?

Monterey13
09-29-2007, 10:58 AM
"it's colder n a well diggers *** out here!!"

"I'm nervous as a ***** in chuch"

"how ya doin? ah I'm fair ta middlin"

M_Gunz
09-29-2007, 04:02 PM
Texan friend at restaurant, "Uh want muh stake rare"
Waitress, "How rare?"
Texan friend, "Cut off his horns, wipe his *** and lead him on out here!"

ViktorViktor
09-30-2007, 05:16 AM
One of the first times I stopped at a trucker's cafe for a hamburger in the South (well, actually it was southwest Texas) back when I was an impressionable young man traveling alone for the first time - a middle-aged-yet-still-curvaceous waitress came up to my table and said to me in a soft Southern drawl:

'Hello darling, anything you got a hankering for ?'

I was so embarassed by being called darling that it must have taken 30 seconds before I could say anything, and to top if off I had forgotten what I wanted to order.