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texhill88
08-01-2006, 09:48 AM
Most of the time I have trouble landing the Fw-190 and the He-111 I have had some really bad accidents one time I mananged to get the He-111 on the ground but failed to ruduce power and lost control and smashed into the control tower it was bad I did take a screenshot of it but I couldent find it. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif Send some pictures or screen shots of your really bad landings so i dot feel as bad.

texhill88
08-01-2006, 09:48 AM
Most of the time I have trouble landing the Fw-190 and the He-111 I have had some really bad accidents one time I mananged to get the He-111 on the ground but failed to ruduce power and lost control and smashed into the control tower it was bad I did take a screenshot of it but I couldent find it. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif Send some pictures or screen shots of your really bad landings so i dot feel as bad.

WWMaxGunz
08-01-2006, 10:00 AM
Both very heavy planes and hard to get slow enough without stalling and falling.
I can reccomend working with prop pitch as well as power on approach. High % pitch with low
power will slow you down as the prop disk(s) become air brakes. Also open the rad flaps full
for that extra bit of drag.

And then there's the 'other' pitch which is nose pitch in relation to the horizon.
I stick with an old landing mantra that (nose) pitch controls speed and power controls altitude.

As soon as yer down, bring the flaps up to cut your lift and power to idle. You should not have
the energy to get back off the ground at that point if your speed is low and you don't yank the
stick back. If you caught the runways close to the near end then you should have room to stop.

triggerhappyfin
08-01-2006, 10:07 AM
Try to get the airspeed as close to 180 kph as possible and use throttle to keep the plane manouverable down to touch down...then trottle back. An easy way to make smooth landings http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif ...when I dont crasch ..that is http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/disagree.gif

SithSpeeder
08-01-2006, 10:08 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by WWMaxGunz:

I stick with an old landing mantra that (nose) pitch controls speed and power controls altitude. </div></BLOCKQUOTE> That is excellent advice that most people don't intuitively understand. I read about that very recently in a book called "Stick and Rudder" which has even more good advice about flying and landing real planes. I started applying it in game just the last two times out and have already significantly improved my landing success rate.

* Speeder *

Crash_Moses
08-01-2006, 10:23 AM
Yup, Stick and Rudder is a great book. Read it three times in a row as a kid.

The above advice is all good. The only other thing I would throw into the mix is practice. Practice, practice, practice. I was having a heck of a time landing the Val on a carrier so I set up a practice mission so I could attempt to land over and over and over until I got it right.

S!

WWMaxGunz
08-01-2006, 10:46 AM
I bet Sith is getting better at other things like shooting and energy management too.

Grue_
08-01-2006, 12:43 PM
With plenty of altitude, practice getting the plane in a 500m/min descent at a constant speed (landing speed with flaps down preferably).

This is called a glideslope.

Next practice applying your glideslope to a runway. If you are going to undershoot, increase power to slow your descent if you are going to overshoot decrease power to increase your descent (not too much though!).

With fighters, it is usually best to line up the runway in a turn so the engine doesn't hide your view.

Hope this helps.

mortoma1958
08-01-2006, 01:02 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by WWMaxGunz:
Both very heavy planes and hard to get slow enough without stalling and falling.
I can reccomend working with prop pitch as well as power on approach. High % pitch with low
power will slow you down as the prop disk(s) become air brakes. Also open the rad flaps full
for that extra bit of drag.

And then there's the 'other' pitch which is nose pitch in relation to the horizon.
I stick with an old landing mantra that (nose) pitch controls speed and power controls altitude.

As soon as yer down, bring the flaps up to cut your lift and power to idle. You should not have
the energy to get back off the ground at that point if your speed is low and you don't yank the
stick back. If you caught the runways close to the near end then you should have room to stop. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>I disagree with such advice, as far as the suggestion of retracting flaps right away. Fully down in landing config, flaps provide far more drag than lift so they help slow down the plane on the landing run. Now if you use take-off position, then, yes, retract them right away as they are giving you far more lift than drag, just the opposite. This is true in real life and it's modeled very well in this game. This is why commercial airline pilots leave the flaps and airbrakes extended until they are just about to turn off the runway onto the taxi way. They want all that stuff out to help slow the plane. And that it does effectively above 60 knots or so. Below that their extension no longer helps. I used to fly light singles and if I was landing with any more than 20 degrees of flap, I left them extended until taxi time.

Waldo.Pepper
08-01-2006, 01:06 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">left them extended until taxi time. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Didn't that leave them vulnerable to damage from rocks (other FOD) etc.?

mortoma1958
08-01-2006, 01:13 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by SithSpeeder:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by WWMaxGunz:

I stick with an old landing mantra that (nose) pitch controls speed and power controls altitude. </div></BLOCKQUOTE> That is excellent advice that most people don't intuitively understand. I read about that very recently in a book called "Stick and Rudder" which has even more good advice about flying and landing real planes. I started applying it in game just the last two times out and have already significantly improved my landing success rate.

* Speeder * </div></BLOCKQUOTE>It's mostly true but really you use both. I have never landed a real or virtual plane where I used <span class="ev_code_RED">only</span> power to to control altitude and <span class="ev_code_RED">only </span>pitch to control speed!! I bet it would be pretty hard to
totally control altitude with just the power if your stick or yoke was stuck in a fairly neutral position. Likewise, it would be hard to control speed properly with just pitch alone if your throttle was stuck. In reality it's a combination of the two in both cases. But yes, in general, speed is mostly controlled with pitch and gaining or losing altitude is mostly controlled with power setting.

carguy_
08-01-2006, 01:13 PM
Retracting flaps fully just after touchdown helps braking.I`m pretty sure WWMaxGunz forgot to mention that he pulls the stick all the way back to bring the nose up so the braking wheels will not cause the plane to flip over.In this case,landing flaps create a danger that the plane will try to takeoff using the additional lift flaps provide.If this happens,the plane gainst 5-10m of altitude and can hit the ground with not a small impact.

That`s what I do.Normally I need 1/3 of the landing strip to land succesfully that way.

mortoma1958
08-01-2006, 01:22 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by carguy_:
Retracting flaps fully just after touchdown helps braking.I`m pretty sure WWMaxGunz forgot to mention that he pulls the stick all the way back to bring the nose up so the braking wheels will not cause the plane to flip over.In this case,landing flaps create a danger that the plane will try to takeoff using the additional lift flaps provide.If this happens,the plane gainst 5-10m of altitude and can hit the ground with not a small impact.

That`s what I do.Normally I need 1/3 of the landing strip to land succesfully that way. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Well you have to do what's best for you as an individiual and what works for you in game. I never retract flaps right away in any of the sim planes and I never have any trouble. I fly them like I used to fly real aircraft. Although I admit I neve accumulated a lot of hours in real aircraft. I only flew for three years.

I was never a perfect pilot. One time I was asked by the airport manager to fuel up a Skyhawk II at another airport before bringing it back because the plane was to rented out on my return and they had run out of fuel. Well I did so, but somehow I didn't replace the fuel cap on top of the right wing correctly and it fell off before I took off. Therefore I streamed fuel out of the tank for 25 nautical miles on the return trip!! Oops!!! And then to make matters worse they could not rent the plane for several days. At least I admit my goofs. Not relevant to the original topic really but just showing I'm not perfect.