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View Full Version : Winter, altitude and overheating



drose01
05-05-2005, 11:01 PM
Now I know it seems obvious, but does the game factor in what one would expect to be colder ambient temperatures in determining how fast your aircraft overheats?

For instance, on a frozen landscape winter map, does overheating your engine come more slowly?

And for that matter, does your engine also stay cooler at 4000 meters than at 400? And does it get hotter when playing the Coral Sea map than, say, the Aleutians?

It seems to me that these are factored in, but then I wonder if I am just imagining...

drose01
05-05-2005, 11:01 PM
Now I know it seems obvious, but does the game factor in what one would expect to be colder ambient temperatures in determining how fast your aircraft overheats?

For instance, on a frozen landscape winter map, does overheating your engine come more slowly?

And for that matter, does your engine also stay cooler at 4000 meters than at 400? And does it get hotter when playing the Coral Sea map than, say, the Aleutians?

It seems to me that these are factored in, but then I wonder if I am just imagining...

Reaves_42
05-05-2005, 11:28 PM
I am prepared to be mistaken but as far as I know (and can remember) it does affect over heating. I say this because I remember an old dog-fght map pre ace-expansion where flying in the centre of the desert would cause your temp to go up faster.

Fennec_P
05-05-2005, 11:36 PM
Yes on both counts. You'll find overheat is delayed considerably on cold maps, or at high altitudes.

Airspeed also affects it. Flying faster=cooler.

On desert maps at low alts, you'll overheat even without WEP.

Bluedog72
05-05-2005, 11:41 PM
Outside air temerature differances at differant altitudes and terrains is certainly modelled, to see this, simply climb an He-111 for a while.
Pan the pilot view up and to the right and you will see an outside air temp. guage.

I've allways figured that temperature actually plays a part in the performance of your plane, otherwise, why bother modelling changing air temp at all?

LEXX_Luthor
05-06-2005, 06:08 PM
Well, they modded a TB~3 rolling pencil but TB~3 bombadier can't exactly write with it on his/her map. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

mortoma
05-11-2005, 10:09 AM
Actually, believe it or not, even though it's cold at high altitude, in real life overheating can be a big problem up there. Even with the super cold temps, the density of the molecules reduces the effects of that cold substantaily. Pilots of turbocharged reciprocating engined aircraft will be only too glad to tell you about how easy it is to get overheated at high altitudes. Those molecules of cold air are simply too far apart from each other. I'm a pilot and have talked to other pilots about this. It's particulary troublesome with planes like the Piper Malibu, which is a turbo with a piston engine and can go vpretty darn high too.
The use of cowl flaps when climbing from one high
flight level to another higher one is usually necessary!!!

mortoma
05-11-2005, 10:10 AM
Actually, believe it or not, even though it's cold at high altitude, in real life overheating can be a big problem up there. Even with the super cold temps, the density of the molecules reduces the effects of that cold substantaily. Pilots of turbocharged reciprocating engined aircraft will be only too glad to tell you about how easy it is to get overheated at high altitudes. Those molecules of cold air are simply too far apart from each other. I'm a pilot and have talked to other pilots about this. It's particulary troublesome with planes like the Piper Malibu, which is a turbo with a piston engine and can go vpretty darn high too.
The use of cowl flaps when climbing from one high flight level to another higher one is usually necessary!!!

major_setback
05-12-2005, 09:44 AM
You can say that again!

IL2-chuter
05-13-2005, 01:51 AM
What he ^ said . . . http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif