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View Full Version : Churchill, Hitler, Stalin et al to be excised from British school textbooks



Ob.Emann
07-13-2007, 10:50 PM
http://www.thesun.co.uk/article/0,,2-2007320449,00.html

Unbefreakinlievable.


Britain's cigar-chomping World War Two PM " famed for his two-finger victory salute " was removed from a list of figures secondary school children must learn about.

Instead they will be taught about "relevant" issues such as global warming and drug dangers. Churchill's grandson, Tory MP Nicholas Soames, branded the move "total madness."

I find this ironic, considering that just a week or two ago on this forum we were all wagging our fingers at the Japanese government for taking scissors and correction fluid to the more 'inconvenient' aspects of their history and teaching it i their schools. I, however, personally find the Japanese policy of historical whitewashing preferable to this new British one of omitting the greatest figures of modern history in favor of GLOBAL WARMING (be afraid and buy a Prius). Of course, there is nothing wrong with the study of more modern issues, but not at the expense of forsaking the past.



@ Emann
Hey E, you need to reduce the height of your signature. Forum specs are 500 x 150. Thanks m8.

@ Quazi
No problem. Thanks for the heads-up.
- Emann

Ob.Emann
07-13-2007, 10:50 PM
http://www.thesun.co.uk/article/0,,2-2007320449,00.html

Unbefreakinlievable.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Britain's cigar-chomping World War Two PM " famed for his two-finger victory salute " was removed from a list of figures secondary school children must learn about.

Instead they will be taught about "relevant" issues such as global warming and drug dangers. Churchill's grandson, Tory MP Nicholas Soames, branded the move "total madness." </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I find this ironic, considering that just a week or two ago on this forum we were all wagging our fingers at the Japanese government for taking scissors and correction fluid to the more 'inconvenient' aspects of their history and teaching it i their schools. I, however, personally find the Japanese policy of historical whitewashing preferable to this new British one of omitting the greatest figures of modern history in favor of GLOBAL WARMING (be afraid and buy a Prius). Of course, there is nothing wrong with the study of more modern issues, but not at the expense of forsaking the past.



@ Emann
Hey E, you need to reduce the height of your signature. Forum specs are 500 x 150. Thanks m8.

@ Quazi
No problem. Thanks for the heads-up.
- Emann

Pirschjaeger
07-13-2007, 10:59 PM
Unbelieveable is an understatement, but are we missing some information? How can you study WW2 without the characters?

Maybe they plan to be more indepth at the high school level? In this way, I was deem things more believable.

heywooood
07-13-2007, 11:06 PM
who is going to let that happen?

seems to me public schools are programmed to remove independant thought and charisma from their pupils in favor of conformity and banality...lethargic sausages are easier to handle than independant, free thinking young minds.

No one seems cognizant of the long term ill effects this has on society - when suddenly there are no spirited individuals capable of critical analysis or taking leadership roles and making command decisions when they are called for.

More ritalyn and prozac for the kids that cant sit still for eight hours straight and be bored to tears with repetitive memorization excercises...f'sake - they are discouraged from playing at recess fer cryin' out loud...no tag, no teamball, no tetherball, no running, no climbing, no breathing....

just ritalyn and rote

Pirschjaeger
07-13-2007, 11:38 PM
Heywood, you just accurately described the situation in China, save the drugs. Is western demo going commie?

leitmotiv
07-14-2007, 12:29 AM
Well, this has been happening among the dunces who determine curriculums in the secondary schools in the U.S. and U.K. for years. History and civilization are irrelevant. Dig what a publisher friend sent me today. This epitomizes the way some of these mindless dolts in education think:

http://www.worldmagblog.com/blog/archives/005922.html

Ob.Emann
07-14-2007, 01:46 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by heywooood:
who is going to let that happen?

seems to me public schools are programmed to remove independant thought and charisma from their pupils in favor of conformity and banality...lethargic sausages are easier to handle than independant, free thinking young minds. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

As someone who is currently a prisoner--excuse me--student of the public school system (American one, which the British are unfortunately beginning to imitate very convincingly), I can say with some authority that you are absolutely right. It's not education, it's conditioning.

For me, education occurs when I get home from school and pick up a book or go to the library. Here at least, high school is just a sort of state-run social club where you study for government-sponsored tests for four years, during which you read an occasional Steinbeck novel and learn that the Holocaust was bad.

Whirlin_merlin
07-14-2007, 02:00 AM
Relax chaps it's the SUN, as my ol' grandad used to say. 'only believe two things in the sun, the date and racing results.'.

Stories like this pop up then disappear. I teach in the UK and whilst there is an awful lot wrong in our education system, it's not that fekked up.

leitmotiv
07-14-2007, 02:02 AM
You have my sympathy, HH_Emann. You write better than 99% of the Ph.D. candidates I knew in college. I was training to be a keeper in one of those institutions years ago, and, I could not stomach either the moronic education classes to be a high school teacher, nor the free-fire zone of the high schools in California. At that time education was being conducted by work sheet. The teacher passed out a work sheet at the start of the class along with books (there were not enough books for the students to take home books), and for the rest of the period the students filled-in the work sheets. It was a moronic inferno. My teacher who was to initiate me into the art of teaching went out and got drunk during her lunch break. I decided to go for a Ph.D. and teach on the college level. That is another moronic inferno.

leitmotiv
07-14-2007, 02:15 AM
My goilfriend in London was a special ed teacher on the elementary level (I can't rememeber your terminology, sorry---ages 6-12). She was driven around the bend by all the paperwork (and still is). The Govt wants daily reports on the children. I suspect it's so they can fabricate evidence to sack her any time which suits them. She is so exhausted all the time she hates what she is doing. She has been a teacher since about 1970, and the joy ceased years ago because of what has happened to the profession in the U.K. I thought the teachers had it tough in the U.S., but the pressure she was under seemed to me to be unbearable.

Roblex
07-14-2007, 02:43 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
Unbelieveable is an understatement, but are we missing some information? How can you study WW2 without the characters?

Maybe they plan to be more indepth at the high school level? In this way, I was deem things more believable. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I don't know if things have changed but when I went to school they did not cover WW1 or WW2 at all. Neither did my children. At a junior level they covered things like The Roman Empire, Elizabethans, Victorians etc. At Senior/Secondary/High School level we covered things like The Industrial Revolution, American inter-war Isolationism, African Independance. etc.

When my kids were doing history it was even worse. They had to cover PC subjects such as the oppression of the Irish & the Catholics. They would be set an essay that says 'The buildings that Guy Fawkes rented to place his explosives were owned by a Protestant Politician. Comment on what this indictates' They were expected to say that it was proof that the whole Gunpowder Plot was a set-up to discredit the Catholics. My son, who was cursed by a Mensa level IQ and suffered for it at school, said 'What's so strange about the buildings next door to the Houses Of Parliament being owned by one of the richest men in the country?' and the teacher treated him like he had suggested gassing all Jews!
I am fine with presenting kids with the possibility that it was a Protestant set-up but they rammed it down their throats as a given with the flimsiest of evidence such as 'The person that tipped off the authorities was anonymous' or 'most of the plotters died during the arrest'.

MEGILE
07-14-2007, 02:52 AM
Got a better source than the toilet paper?

joeap
07-14-2007, 03:18 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Whirlin_merlin:
Relax chaps it's the SUN, as my ol' grandad used to say. 'only believe two things in the sun, the date and racing results.'.

Stories like this pop up then disappear. I teach in the UK and whilst there is an awful lot wrong in our education system, it's not that fekked up. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Megile:
Got a better source than the toilet paper? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Guys guys guys, jumping on something that hasn't even happened yet from a source that.....isn't

Pirschjaeger
07-14-2007, 03:41 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Roblex:

I don't know if things have changed but when I went to school they did not cover WW1 or WW2 at all. Neither did my children. At a junior level they covered things like The Roman Empire, Elizabethans, Victorians etc. At Senior/Secondary/High School level we covered things like The Industrial Revolution, American inter-war Isolationism, African Independance. etc.
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

We covered the wars in High school. Actually, I was kind of puzzled as to why secondary students would be studying WW2. I had assumed, by the characters included, that they were teaching WW2. There's too much info missing from the article.

Joeap is right, there's really nothing to get upset about. If the UK Sun is anything like the Sun in Germany and Canada, it's only the breasts that can be taken seriously and should be carefully reviewed.

HotelBushranger
07-14-2007, 03:51 AM
I feel your pain bros. Western Australia's former Education Minister, Liljaana Ravlich (curse her), firstly introduced Outcomes Based Education, the most counterproductive system ever implemented. Then she proceeded to destroy the curriculum, including abolishing history all together as a subject. According to her, whenever a student wants to learn history they can 'Google it.' THANKfully, she is no longer the education minister but we are still suffering as a result of her existence.

MEGILE
07-14-2007, 04:02 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
it's only the breasts that can be taken seriously and should be carefully reviewed. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

LMAO prish

SeaFireLIV
07-14-2007, 04:18 AM
This is hyped nonsense. the Sun is especially good for this, but has enough readership to force MPs to respond making it even seem more legit.

Airmail109
07-14-2007, 04:55 AM
If you actually read the changes further down the page its not so bad, in fact some of them are great.

Actually Brilliant, school will be less boring.

muchaclopiec
07-14-2007, 05:02 AM
The sun....? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif

Xiolablu3
07-14-2007, 05:55 AM
Awww man its from the Sun.

WHy is ANYONE taking this seriously?


I talked to a lad a while back who reads the Sun every morning and he said

'Hey, I read the other day that they say Elvis might still be alive...Me Grandmas really excited'

100% true I swear.


Throw it away...

Pirschjaeger
07-14-2007, 08:06 AM
The last time I read the German Sun it was claiming that Hitler didn't pay his taxes. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

and?

Hey, just a thought, if Hitler didn't pay his taxes, would Austria be responsible for those taxes plus interest? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

But, the girl on the second page had nice breasts. I am willing to pay her taxes.

Sun is actually an acronym in my mind. S.U.N "See Ueber Nipples" http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/inlove.gif

CzechTexan
07-14-2007, 08:50 AM
Western Civilization is in decline because the people do not know history. Students and adults are being conditioned into numb-minded masses of ignorant zombies. Drugs, prozac, ritilin, dumbed-down education, political correctness, and liberal mass media are just a few of the problems.

Ignorant masses of people are just what controlling leaders want. It's all about gaining power. Communists and Islamo-Fascists use this tactic to gain control over entire countries. Political parties in the USA seek the same thing for America.

Technology helps make modern events take place much faster than events of the past. Things can happen very quickly now and the dumb masses won't even see it coming. Western Civilization better wake up soon or else YOU will be saying, "yes master."

heywooood
07-14-2007, 09:07 AM
my 7th grade history teacher, a Mr Hamilton served on the Missouri in WWII as a gunners mate... We learned alot about WWII in general and the Pacific war in depth - a big fan of battlewagons was Mr H. and also of Clydesdale horses - probably for all the same reasons...
Now we learned alot about world history and US history from our textbook in that class, but the best and most frequent source of enlightenment in that class came from free discussion and the recollections of Mr Hamilton.

That would not be possible today - My son is a recent graduate of a US high school and whenever I talk about my teachers he just laughs and says there could be no such discussions or dialogues like that today - no time...gotta memorize the agenda and follow the scripts and besides, none of his teachers had any real life experiences that he was aware of - or cared to be aware of.

Instructors today are discouraged mightily from deviating from the prescibed education plan - wastes time and might expose the school to a legal action if someone thinks the discussion was 'out of bounds' or in some other way 'distasteful' - fer f'sakes they might learn something.

raaaid
07-14-2007, 09:32 AM
this is another prove on the educational system to be a tool of power to keep us submitted

JG53_Valantine
07-14-2007, 09:50 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Instructors today are discouraged mightily from deviating from the prescibed education plan - wastes time and might expose the school to a legal action if someone thinks the discussion was 'out of bounds' or in some other way 'distasteful' - fer f'sakes they might learn something. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Im an English teacher in the UK, so it may be different over here then it is in the US. However we arn't given any scripts to learn and simply speak at the children, if there's a lack of discussion and free communication then that's simply bad, and/or lazy teaching. I know that kids today are far different to those in the past, it's harder to discipline them even when there's probably more need to do it in todays society.

Yes teachers have a core curriculum to keep to but we do have our own choices in what to teach on that curriculum. There will be one or two core parts we have to teach and to a certain standard but a lot of it we can choose from several options. One thing i have certainly noticed through my time teaching is that teachers who act as though they have scripts to read from often have terrible classroom management, on a side note they also seem to be the ones with the least job satisfaction!

The idea that the educational system is a "tool of power to keep us submitted" is pure tosh. If you must blame anything blame a lack of funding, deteriorating social values and overworked teachers working to constantly changing expectations and schedules.

raaaid
07-14-2007, 10:04 AM
my self i intend to become a teacher i dont blame the teachers i blame the system that nullifies the option of questioning things that are hold as absolut truths

Stew278
07-14-2007, 10:55 AM
I have to agree with what many here have said about the school systems. High school was mostly focused on teaching conformity and social obedience. Peer pressure was also pretty good for silencing anyone that had any enthusiasm for learning. I often feel sorry for the teachers because I'm sure they like to teach, but most of the students really don't want to learn. They're more concerned about socializing or mindless pop culture distractions than anything else. Vanity and self-obsession leave no room for trivial things such as math or history lessons.

The unfortunate reality is that knowledge has far less importance today than the "soft skills" companies are always looking for. Networking and social skills seem far more desirable than knowledge or tangible abilities. Who cares if someone is an incompetent moron, as long as they are pretty and fun? Besides, people that are slaves to peer pressure are easy to control. Being smart and working hard isn't nearly as important as being popular in terms of how successful your career will be.

Who needs knowledge when you have computers? You already have spell checkers to correct spelling and grammatical errors. Everyone just goes to wikipedia now when they need to find something. When I was grading other grad student's papers 3/4 of the references would be from that website. The professors here are always trying to push us to think critically and creatively. It's scary how many of these soon to be PhD's seem to lack the ability for either.

Even the colleges have lowered expectations nowadays. In many cases college has just become an excuse for kids to defer maturity or responsibility for another 5 or 6 years. I would say that when I was an undergrad about 1/3 of the students in my classes were genuinely committed to getting their degree and the other 2/3 were there just because. They actually had to lower the GPA requirements to earn the degree from 2.5 to 2.0 because so many students were in jeopardy of not graduating.

My current university doesn't even have GPA or ACT requirements for undergrads to get in. All someone needs is a diploma or GED and enough money to cover the tuition. The idea is that everyone should have the opportunity for a college education. So even higher education is falling into mediocrity.

Ob.Emann
07-14-2007, 11:04 AM
Sorry, I was unaware that the Sun is basically a tabloid, but this story seems to be corroborated by the Independent.

Classroom revolution as curriculum embraces modern life (http://education.independent.co.uk/news/article2765570.ece)

heywooood
07-14-2007, 11:06 AM
I hope my oppinions are not taken as disparaging towards teachers...did I spell disparaging correctly?

Not at all - still a noble profession entered into by well meaning and seemingly selfless individuals for the most part today...

My barbs are for the institutions and their leadership, underfunded or not, which are failing our students and our brightest teachers miserably.

Restricting critical thought skills and free expression constantly beating down the individual and reducing young minds to mush with redundant tests and restrictive obedience training...and lets not forget the narcotics we have no trouble adminstering to pre-adolescents to keep them still - never mind the lack of long term testing of these drugs...

The UK might be ahead of US schools - to date ranked 38th among industrialized nations - hard to be any lower - and losing ground every day.

But don't ask a California Administrator where we stand, they will all tell you - erroniously - that our education system is the best in the world hahahahah! You can't fix what you don't even know is broken buncha knuckle draggin' mouth breathing, morons...

M_Gunz
07-14-2007, 11:13 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by raaaid:
this is another prove on the educational system to be a tool of power to keep us submitted </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Look the other way, that where you live there is education for children at all.
Or that we have access to news from all over, you think Reuters is politically controlled?
We have a lot in 1st world and the stuff gets better but life gets more expensive yearly.

There is more of the world where they have access to less, less education and harder lives
with more dangers than there is 1st world in terms of population. You want to complain,
complain about how their governments are too!

Blutarski2004
07-14-2007, 11:35 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by leitmotiv:
My goilfriend in London was a special ed teacher on the elementary level (I can't rememeber your terminology, sorry---ages 6-12). She was driven around the bend by all the paperwork (and still is). The Govt wants daily reports on the children. I suspect it's so they can fabricate evidence to sack her any time which suits them. She is so exhausted all the time she hates what she is doing. She has been a teacher since about 1970, and the joy ceased years ago because of what has happened to the profession in the U.K. I thought the teachers had it tough in the U.S., but the pressure she was under seemed to me to be unbearable. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


..... The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, in its wisdom, enacted some years ago a very generous special education program for the learning disabled. All manner of special services and privileges are granted, up to and including personal shuttle service to take children to and from school, fully state-paid tutoring, even a one-on-one student-teacher relationship in certain cases.

We have now reached the point (and this is no lie, ladies and gentlemen) where one in every six public schoolchildren in Massachusetts is classified on one level or another as a special-education student.

The school department of the town of Medfield MA, where I once lived, saw a $60,000 budget surplus one year when a family with two special education students unexpectedly moved out of the school district.

Stew278
07-14-2007, 11:41 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by heywooood:
My barbs are for the institutions and their leadership, underfunded or not, which are failing our students and our brightest teachers miserably.

Restricting critical thought skills and free expression constantly beating down the individual and reducing young minds to mush with redundant tests and restrictive obedience training...and lets not forget the narcotics we have no trouble adminstering to pre-adolescents to keep them still - never mind the lack of long term testing of these drugs...

The UK might be ahead of US schools - to date ranked 38th among industrialized nations - hard to be any lower - and losing ground every day.
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Most of the students in my department are from India or China. They are always telling me how competitive the schools are there compared to the US. I think a big part of the problem is that everyone here gets to go to school so they take it for granted. The competition for jobs or university admissions isn't nearly as fierce. In a lot of other countries, only those that are truly committed get to stay in school. The best and brightest in America are still on par with the best in the rest of the world. The problem is there is a ton of dead weight at the bottom dragging our scores down. In many other countries, those people would simply be booted out of school.

It's ironic that all during elementary and high school they were trying to squash any form of creative or critical thought and now in college I find that my professors are frustrated that the students lack these skills. What do they expect? The most successful students were those that colored between the lines and memorized everything they were told.

I remember when I was in elementary school the teacher's attitude towards the rambunctious kids was 'boys will be boys'. Now its more like 'we need to pacify these kids into little girls so they sit there quietly with their hands folded and stop disrupting my class'. What ever happened to letting kids be kids?

heywooood
07-14-2007, 01:05 PM
when I was a kid we spent a good 1-1/2 hours of every school day outside...weather permitting.

Now - with the 'university system' inplace - administrators have deemed that time to be too valuable to just let kids play - they need to be cramming for tests designed to get them through to the next grade and eventually to the SAT's with no other goal in mind...its college or nothing as far as they can see so guess what - for alot of kids its nothing.

NEWS FLASH!!!
Not every kid is going to go to university - not every kid is a failure who doesn't...and life doesn't suck if you have a decent education but no degree.

But in this all or nothing administrative stance many are either left with no real training other than compliance and obedience and conformity, or they are so discouraged they check out with drugs, alchohol, or violence...now that IS a handicap.

Used to be you could run a small business with a high school education...I know many self-employed small business operators who started with nothing else - now the school system is focused so narrowly on 'preparing kids for college' that there is no avenue - no dedication in our schools to train or educate people in any real world capacity. All these 'other kids' are no longer getting a decent education - feck - even the ones who drone through it at the head of their classes are ill prepared according to most university studies.

Also - in addition to eliminating exercise from a childs daily regimen they have removed art and music training as being superfluous and unnecessary courses (or expenses) - this leaves a very dry, and somber day for a young mind to deal with for a 6 or 8 hour school day, day in and day out....I couldn't put up with it if I were a kid.

No wonder they're freaking out.

Roblex
07-14-2007, 01:58 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">We have now reached the point (and this is no lie, ladies and gentlemen) where one in every six public schoolchildren in Massachusetts is classified on one level or another as a special-education student. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I went back to Uni as a mature student a few years back and saw a similar thing in the UK. Any student classified as dyslexic gets extra time to do their work, ectra time to do exams and can get handouts to pay for laptops and tape recorders etc. I swear that 10-15% of the students at my Uni were getting that help. Is dylexia really that common?

JG53_Valantine
07-14-2007, 01:59 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by heywooood:
Now - with the 'university system' inplace - administrators have deemed that time to be too valuable to just let kids play - they need to be cramming for tests designed to get them through to the next grade and eventually to the SAT's with no other goal in mind...its college or nothing as far as they can see so guess what - for alot of kids its nothing.
Also - in addition to eliminating exercise from a childs daily regimen they have removed art and music training as being superfluous and unnecessary courses (or expenses) . </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I definately agree with you on the first point, alot of educational "goals" set for teachers are to get as many students as possible into sixth form, college or university. Infact this percentage is relayed to you at your end of year appraisal. Education is very target driven now and has taken to being almost like a sales position, having set quotas and targets to meet on the number of students achieving x amountts of grades and university placements. Im not saying that teachers shouldn't be measured on their performance and the grades the kids get as it is largely due to the teacher and how successful they have been at transfering subject knowledge to their pupils, but you have to take into consideration the kids who either don't want to learn or who simply can't grasp the subject, as well as those who don;t want to go into further education. So judging teachers mainly on how many students get into further education isnt reflective of the teaching standards.
By teaching as if every pupil will be going, or wants to be going into higher education many students are left behind academically. This isn't something teachers can help with though until the current system is overhauled and our assesments stop being judged on what percentage of our students go on to A levels or university.

As for music and art being removed that, again, is utter tosh. The are still part of the curriculum and are still taught in UK schools until year 10 where the students take their GCSE options. During GCSEs there are many core subjects which have to be taken including - English Literature and Language, the Sciences, Mathematics, One technology course (normally ICT in most schools), Religious Education (at least short course) and one modern language.

Don't blame the teachers, blame the government. We teachers want the education system overhauled but we don't have the power to do it, we can petition and say what we please but it is rarely taken into account by the education authority until we strike. Which ultimately makes us hypocritical as we are striking to get a better education for the kids by taking time off and not teaching the kids! Fun isn't it, and that's before you get into the issues of teacher's salaries!

boxmike
07-14-2007, 03:21 PM
Saw that news during 12th in main Finnish media, thought to post it but never found the source. Of course, it is July and the threshold for publishing any news is kinda low.
However, I'm sure that in Britain there has has not been a cult, like in some dictatorships still alive, teaching all about their gone and present leaders leader above anything.
For what I know, Winston Churchill was an individual, a feature that is not allowed to too many people, especially in politics. But they still went on, finally on their own will, without brown nosing the old guard, if they ever did that; still aware that the enemies were about but continued with their own courage in the face of losing everything, finally managing to give everything for their Nation.

To worry about future is good but to forget the past, I'll call it a crime.

Rgds,
- box

XyZspineZyX
07-14-2007, 03:24 PM
I beleive that the Brits would say:

"One doesn't learn just what one is taught at school if one wishes to be educated" http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

MEGILE
07-14-2007, 06:33 PM
Cooking in school should be manditory... so kids learn what fresh food is.

Global warming theory should be covered in Science.. but not to devote students to this.

Stew278
07-14-2007, 07:24 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Roblex:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">We have now reached the point (and this is no lie, ladies and gentlemen) where one in every six public schoolchildren in Massachusetts is classified on one level or another as a special-education student. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I went back to Uni as a mature student a few years back and saw a similar thing in the UK. Any student classified as dyslexic gets extra time to do their work, ectra time to do exams and can get handouts to pay for laptops and tape recorders etc. I swear that 10-15% of the students at my Uni were getting that help. Is dylexia really that common? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Doubtful that it is really that common; a lot of times it is probably parents getting their kids declared to have some disorder so they get the extra help or time in order to give their kid an edge. Either that or the parents just can't accept that their little angel isn't the most brilliant person the world has ever seen, so they have to find some disorder that explains the kid's disappointing academic performance.

The real problem here is the kids can get all of this special help and accommodations when they are in school, but once they enter the working world are they going to get the same treatment? Would it be fair to their employer or coworkers to have to deal with that?

WTE_Moleboy
07-14-2007, 08:45 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by HotelBushranger:
I feel your pain bros. Western Australia's former Education Minister, Liljaana Ravlich (curse her), firstly introduced Outcomes Based Education, the most counterproductive system ever implemented. Then she proceeded to destroy the curriculum, including abolishing history all together as a subject. According to her, whenever a student wants to learn history they can 'Google it.' THANKfully, she is no longer the education minister but we are still suffering as a result of her existence. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/agreepost.gif
Currently doing my TEE- Ravlich has made it a damn sight harder- Have no idea how I am actually doing because of the ever changing level system.

EiZ0N
07-14-2007, 09:07 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by HH_Emann:
Sorry, I was unaware that the Sun is basically a tabloid, but this story seems to be corroborated by the Independent.

Classroom revolution as curriculum embraces modern life (http://education.independent.co.uk/news/article2765570.ece) </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Not really. Title of this thread is "Churchill, Hitler, etc to be excised from British school textbooks"

yet the independent link you post says

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">There was consternation, though, that Winston Churchill and Adolf Hitler's names had been omitted from the list of historical figures to be studied, a decision described by the Conservative MP Nicholas Soames as madness. But the QCA and the Government pointed out that study of the First and Second World Wars was compulsory and it would be impossible to teach those topics without studying Churchill and Hitler. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

HotelBushranger
07-15-2007, 01:21 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by WTE_Moleboy:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by HotelBushranger:
I feel your pain bros. Western Australia's former Education Minister, Liljaana Ravlich (curse her), firstly introduced Outcomes Based Education, the most counterproductive system ever implemented. Then she proceeded to destroy the curriculum, including abolishing history all together as a subject. According to her, whenever a student wants to learn history they can 'Google it.' THANKfully, she is no longer the education minister but we are still suffering as a result of her existence. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/agreepost.gif
Currently doing my TEE- Ravlich has made it a damn sight harder- Have no idea how I am actually doing because of the ever changing level system. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Where you from Moleboy? I'm in Perth, doing my TEE as well.

WTE_Moleboy
07-15-2007, 02:06 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by HotelBushranger:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by WTE_Moleboy:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by HotelBushranger:
I feel your pain bros. Western Australia's former Education Minister, Liljaana Ravlich (curse her), firstly introduced Outcomes Based Education, the most counterproductive system ever implemented. Then she proceeded to destroy the curriculum, including abolishing history all together as a subject. According to her, whenever a student wants to learn history they can 'Google it.' THANKfully, she is no longer the education minister but we are still suffering as a result of her existence. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/agreepost.gif
Currently doing my TEE- Ravlich has made it a damn sight harder- Have no idea how I am actually doing because of the ever changing level system. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Where you from Moleboy? I'm in Perth, doing my TEE as well. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Another Perth boy! Doing Aviation at Greenwood SHS as part of my Tee!

HotelBushranger
07-15-2007, 02:40 AM
Beauty, wheres that? I go to Willetton SHS, south of the river.

WTE_Moleboy
07-15-2007, 03:35 AM
North of the River, off Hepburn Av.

HotelBushranger
07-15-2007, 04:29 AM
One of them rich kids hey http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

WTE_Moleboy
07-15-2007, 04:48 AM
Of Course! You would be one of those poor south of the river kids who fish for tea in the river then? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

HotelBushranger
07-15-2007, 05:22 AM
With sticks o dynamite and all! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif

Ratsack
07-15-2007, 06:00 AM
Watch out for the blue / green algae, then.

Ratsack

HotelBushranger
07-15-2007, 06:20 AM
Nah mate its the icing on the cake http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

KRISTORF
07-15-2007, 06:53 AM
Great innit, deny or question the Holocaust and its a criminal offence, deny one of the greatest ever Britons, and possibly one of the greatest leaders of all time and you get encouragd to do so

Ratsack
07-15-2007, 07:10 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by HotelBushranger:
Nah mate its the icing on the cake http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I thought they did Aeronautics as a TEE course at Melville. You could've bused in from there, rather than Willeton.

...mind you, my intelligence may be out of date. A little.

Ratsack