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Phas3e
08-01-2006, 01:33 PM
Hi, just a quick question..

As far as I know the Beaugfighter was known by this name
because of its sleeve valve Hercules engines and the speed and tree top heights with which it attacked.
Now Ive had someone on another forum swear that it was because they attacked with their engines idling, because his 'uncle flew them in the pacfic' and told him this years ago.

Ive found nothing to say this is true, even 'Beaugfighters over Burma' makes no mention of it.

can anyone shed some light on this?

Phas3e
08-01-2006, 01:33 PM
Hi, just a quick question..

As far as I know the Beaugfighter was known by this name
because of its sleeve valve Hercules engines and the speed and tree top heights with which it attacked.
Now Ive had someone on another forum swear that it was because they attacked with their engines idling, because his 'uncle flew them in the pacfic' and told him this years ago.

Ive found nothing to say this is true, even 'Beaugfighters over Burma' makes no mention of it.

can anyone shed some light on this?

MadBadVlad
08-01-2006, 01:52 PM
Both Chaz Bowyer and Jerry Scutts in their Beaufighter books say that it was a peculiarity of the Hercules engine that it could not be heard easily by enemy in front of a low level approach route.

The term whispering death was coined by the pilots themselves and not by the Japanese, as is usually written.

Daiichidoku
08-01-2006, 02:12 PM
a portuguese friend of mine told me how port. Texans, equipped with .50cal gunpods and frag bombs, would switch off the engine before ground straffing Angolans, coming in silently

Bearcat99
08-01-2006, 05:46 PM
To the Japanese, the Beaufighter became known as "The Whispering Death" (not be confused with "Whistling Death F4U Corsair) which gives some idea of the speed at which one could suddenly appear, strike and turn for home. Whether or not the engines were idled I dont know.. but it was capable of coming in low, fast and quiet... and then getting out of dodge very quickly.

The Corsair's distinctive sound earned it the nick-name of "Whistling Death" among the Japanese, partly because of the engine sound, that was caused by the wing-root inlets for engine air.

Xiolablu3
08-01-2006, 06:36 PM
I think it was probably British and American propaganda which made up the name 'whistling death' and 'whispering death' or maybe the pilots themselves.

Probably saying 'Yeah, here comes Whistling death, Tojo!' Or something similar.

It is unlikely that the Japanese or Germans gave a war plane of the enemy such a dangerous, complementry sounding name.

'Forktailed Devil' on the other hand, is much more likely as an insult made up by the Japanese. 'Those damned fork tailed devils are attacking us!'

Its a bit like us saying 'yellow nosed b*st**ds' when talking about the Emils in the Battle of Britain.

PBNA-Boosher
08-01-2006, 09:06 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Xiolablu3:
'Forktailed Devil' on the other hand, is much more likely as an insult made up by the Japanese. 'Those damned fork tailed devils are attacking us!'

Its a bit like us saying 'yellow nosed b*st**ds' when talking about the Emils in the Battle of Britain. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Fork-tailed Devil was a name made up by the Germans after their encounters with stubborn P-38 pilots in North Africa.

leitmotiv
08-01-2006, 09:18 PM
I saw an F4U-1 Corsair at an airshow in the UK and when it did its long dives I eagerly awaited hearing the famous whistle---nothing. I was crushed.

alert_1
08-02-2006, 12:12 AM
Switching off engine just before strafing?I would never believe the story, even if told by real pilot from eyes to eyes....

WOLFMondo
08-02-2006, 12:59 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by leitmotiv:
I saw an F4U-1 Corsair at an airshow in the UK and when it did its long dives I eagerly awaited hearing the famous whistle---nothing. I was crushed. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It would make more sense that the whistling sound was caused by the turbocharger, which at least on the Corsairs and P47 kept in the UK, they are not used when flying displays. Even a turbo in a family car makes high pitch whistling sound.

leitmotiv
08-02-2006, 01:03 AM
Ah---maybe that's it.

MrBlueSky1960
08-02-2006, 02:58 AM
Your all wrong according to this:

"The Japanese nicknamed the Bristol Beaufighter, the 'Whispering Death'." - Invented by some over-imaginative journalist at a bar. In the middle of World War Two, the Japanese weren't likely to answering questions about aircraft nicknames. Similarly, the "Whistling Death" nickname allegedly given to the Chance Vought F4U Corsair by the Japanese is dubious.

http://www.aeroflight.co.uk/misc/myths1.htm

MadBadVlad
08-02-2006, 05:41 AM
Whether a journalist in a bar or a pilot in a mess (I don't think anyone will ever know) fact is that it was not a Japanese invention and I had that RIGHT - Thank you

BSS_CUDA
08-02-2006, 06:16 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by PBNA-Boosher:

Fork-tailed Devil was a name made up by the Germans after their encounters with stubborn P-38 pilots in North Africa. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

just another bit of American propaganda, we all know that the P-38 could not compete with Axis fighters. we have the proof http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/mockface.gif

Xiolablu3
08-02-2006, 06:22 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by BSS_CUDA:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by PBNA-Boosher:

Fork-tailed Devil was a name made up by the Germans after their encounters with stubborn P-38 pilots in North Africa. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

just another bit of American propaganda, we all know that the P-38 could not compete with Axis fighters. we have the proof http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/mockface.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


'Fork tailed devil' is akin to 'Yellow nosed b*stards', does this name really tell you that the P38 could compete well with Germans planes?

'Got the devil' is often said in English, it is no compliment, just a saying, much like 'Fork tailed Devil' for P38 or 'Blow Job' for the jets.

Chuck_Older
08-02-2006, 07:32 AM
Yellow nosed b@satrds was a name for a group, fork tailed devil was a name for a plane. Personally I do not consider the nicknames to be similar other than they are both examples of pilot slang

if the term 'fork tailed devil' was meant to be derogatory, then why doesn't the term use a derogatory word?

"Go to the devil" is not a saying that can be used to "prove" that "fork tailed devil" is derogatory. I'm sorry, but just because the word devil is used, that doesn't make the sayings mean similar things. I think perhaps you misunderstand some of the nuances involved

If a derogatory or derisve term was wanted, I am sure the very articulate Germans could have come up with the name "Fork tailed Pansys" or "fork tailed Marys" or "Fork tailed Poodles" very easily

p1ngu666
08-02-2006, 09:20 AM
the bristol engines sound really smooth, and modern. even in the gladiator http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

most of the noise of planes is projected out the back, aswell

CrazyBadger
08-02-2006, 09:22 AM
I can't contribute as to what causes the sound, but if you want to hear what a "whistling death" sounds like go to
http://www.hobby-lobby.com/corsair-f4u.htm
Scroll down to the windows media video clip and watch. Most of the video is an RC plane but the very beginning is a real Corsair on a fly by.
Enjoy.