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View Full Version : Batteries and the all-electric Focke Wulf.



stathem
10-04-2005, 04:58 AM
I work in battery R+D and reading through a trade journal the other day I find that the sintered plate Ni-Cad cell was invented by German scientists during the war. This got me thinking about the Focke Wulf and it€s electric systems.

So I was wondering, do any of you Consortium guys have any information about the 190 wrt it€s :-

Battery position, physical size, capacity, voltage, charging and chemistry (type)

And also, what about the systems? I know about the flaps and (presumably) the gear. Were any other systems were electrically driven? Other than the lights, obviously.

Thanks, in advance.

stathem
10-04-2005, 04:58 AM
I work in battery R+D and reading through a trade journal the other day I find that the sintered plate Ni-Cad cell was invented by German scientists during the war. This got me thinking about the Focke Wulf and it€s electric systems.

So I was wondering, do any of you Consortium guys have any information about the 190 wrt it€s :-

Battery position, physical size, capacity, voltage, charging and chemistry (type)

And also, what about the systems? I know about the flaps and (presumably) the gear. Were any other systems were electrically driven? Other than the lights, obviously.

Thanks, in advance.

stathem
10-04-2005, 04:35 PM
Just one bump

No-one? anyone?

faustnik
10-04-2005, 04:53 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by stathem:
I work in battery R+D and reading through a trade journal the other day I find that the sintered plate Ni-Cad cell was invented by German scientists during the war. This got me thinking about the Focke Wulf and it€s electric systems.

So I was wondering, do any of you Consortium guys have any information about the 190 wrt it€s :-

Battery position, physical size, capacity, voltage, charging and chemistry (type)

And also, what about the systems? I know about the flaps and (presumably) the gear. Were any other systems were electrically driven? Other than the lights, obviously.

Thanks, in advance. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Interesting question, I'll check my manuals at home and post later.

Oh, here's a quick one, electrically primed Mg151s.

stathem
10-04-2005, 06:15 PM
Ty, Faust. I'm off to bed now, will check back tomorrow.

Yes, for some reason I had it in my head that the guns were electrically primed - a big plus I believe.

IL2-chuter
10-05-2005, 03:13 AM
Prop was electric (full feathering). Trim (movable horizontal stabilizer), flaps and bomb release were electric, also. I know the Ta152H had a lead acid battery but was mostly hydraulic.

Ankanor
10-05-2005, 04:40 AM
also the gear was electrically raised/downed, unlike the hydraulic/pneumatic systems that were more common.

stathem
10-05-2005, 06:48 AM
Thanks chaps.

That's interesting about the Ta, Chuter. I wonder why Tank 'went back' to hydraulic. To save weight or resources? Or was it just that they 'lifted' the Jumo and it's ancilliaries (which, presumably must have included a PTO for the hydraulic systems) wholesale to put into the new fighter. In that case, is the Dora hydraulic also?

I've been googling the subject and looking in the bibles at work but there seems to be very little on the subject of WW2 a/c batteries in general. Presumably there's not very many other odd b'strds like me interested in such an obscure subject.

BBB_Hyperion
10-05-2005, 08:11 AM
Gun arm function was completely electric as well. Resulting only in 10 % sync loss compared to about 30 % mechanic solutions. I read somewhere that trouble appeared when switching on all guns at once the battery got overloaded . So each gun pair had to be activated after each other to avoid this.