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View Full Version : Piper Cub Aircarft Carrier's that Won the War!



woofiedog
05-31-2007, 07:11 AM
Yep... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif Piper Cub, Carrier's help win the War!

During WW2, lightplanes rigged with an overhead hook could "land" by snagging a sling hung from a long cable and roll to a braked halt like the department store change baskets of yore. To take off, they changed slings, opened the throttle and, at flying speed, pulled a lanyard which freed the plane from the sling.

This idea was dreamed up by Capt James H Brodie of the USAAF Transportation Corps during the dark days of the Battle of the Atlantic. Hundreds of successful landings and takeoffs erased the circus flavor from a project which, on paper, seemed like the doings of a pulp fiction writer.

<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">We did not feel it was a risky operation at all, as some did. However, we were concerned about chances to practice, since we were the only two Cubs which could observe the initial landings. We were led to believe we were essential for the success of the whole operation.</span>

A Runway On a Rope... : http://www.aerofiles.com/brodie-rig.html

<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">Scroll to about middle of page</span>... LST BRODIE-GEAR FLIGHT OPERATIONS: http://www.lstmemorial.org/archive/pr0804.htm

http://www.lstmemorial.org/prog04b/je0817e.jpg
<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">Recovering the pilot and
plane after "landing" </span>

http://www.lstmemorial.org/prog04b/je0817g.jpg

<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">Also... </span>

http://www.warfoto.com/bh216a.jpg

<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">LST-386</span>

An Army Piper L-4 Cub artillery observation plane takes off from an LST at Anzio, 1944. LST-386 had an improvised "flight deck" installed in 1943 and flew off four such planes during the landing on Sicily. Later LST modifications, like this one, could carry up to 10 planes and supported the Anzio landing and the invasion of southern France. During 1944, LST-776 evaluated an experimental catapult for launching light planes, as well as Brodie gear. In this system, a cable was stretched between booms to one side of the ship, and planes were launched from a quick-release trolley. LST-776 operated Marine OY-1's over Iwo Jima and Army L-4's at Okinawa. Helicopters began to operate from LST decks in 1949 as they continue to do today.

http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/photos/lst-386.jpg

<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">Link:</span> http://www.warfoto.com/wild_blue_yonder.htm

woofiedog
05-31-2007, 07:11 AM
Yep... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif Piper Cub, Carrier's help win the War!

During WW2, lightplanes rigged with an overhead hook could "land" by snagging a sling hung from a long cable and roll to a braked halt like the department store change baskets of yore. To take off, they changed slings, opened the throttle and, at flying speed, pulled a lanyard which freed the plane from the sling.

This idea was dreamed up by Capt James H Brodie of the USAAF Transportation Corps during the dark days of the Battle of the Atlantic. Hundreds of successful landings and takeoffs erased the circus flavor from a project which, on paper, seemed like the doings of a pulp fiction writer.

<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">We did not feel it was a risky operation at all, as some did. However, we were concerned about chances to practice, since we were the only two Cubs which could observe the initial landings. We were led to believe we were essential for the success of the whole operation.</span>

A Runway On a Rope... : http://www.aerofiles.com/brodie-rig.html

<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">Scroll to about middle of page</span>... LST BRODIE-GEAR FLIGHT OPERATIONS: http://www.lstmemorial.org/archive/pr0804.htm

http://www.lstmemorial.org/prog04b/je0817e.jpg
<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">Recovering the pilot and
plane after "landing" </span>

http://www.lstmemorial.org/prog04b/je0817g.jpg

<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">Also... </span>

http://www.warfoto.com/bh216a.jpg

<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">LST-386</span>

An Army Piper L-4 Cub artillery observation plane takes off from an LST at Anzio, 1944. LST-386 had an improvised "flight deck" installed in 1943 and flew off four such planes during the landing on Sicily. Later LST modifications, like this one, could carry up to 10 planes and supported the Anzio landing and the invasion of southern France. During 1944, LST-776 evaluated an experimental catapult for launching light planes, as well as Brodie gear. In this system, a cable was stretched between booms to one side of the ship, and planes were launched from a quick-release trolley. LST-776 operated Marine OY-1's over Iwo Jima and Army L-4's at Okinawa. Helicopters began to operate from LST decks in 1949 as they continue to do today.

http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/photos/lst-386.jpg

<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">Link:</span> http://www.warfoto.com/wild_blue_yonder.htm

GreyKnight1971
05-31-2007, 07:35 AM
Fantastic! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

Would love to see a video.

woofiedog
05-31-2007, 07:49 AM
Couldn't find one of the Brodie landings... but found this one. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NaXZviwnGao

And a quick takeoff...

Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_dgrBevUOw

JG53Frankyboy
05-31-2007, 07:52 AM
aerial recon , one of the "forgotten" services.
but one of the most important duties!

Philipscdrw
05-31-2007, 08:22 AM
That's amazing. It's like the harness on the USN Akron and USN Macon, but on a ship! Why didn't they continue with it I wonder?

GreyKnight1971
05-31-2007, 08:24 AM
Blinkin' flip!

That guy who took off after only going 18 feet, was he headed in to a gale force wind? Unbelievable! :O

woofiedog
05-31-2007, 01:26 PM
Stinson L-5 Sentinel

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ab/L-5futureshox.jpg

Links:
http://www.geocities.com/akdhc2pilot/history.html
http://www.airbum.com/pireps/PirepStinsonL-5.html

http://www.1000aircraftphotos.com/APS/2869L.jpg

The YO-54, with its fixed leading-edge slats, had great handling qualities but lacked the power and many other features that the Army most desired. They really wanted an aircraft comparable to the impressive Fieseler Storch didn't didn't want to spend a lot of money or wait years for development of a new type. Many good designs were already around that could match the Fiesler, including the Vultee (Stinson) L-1 / O-49, but all were found wanting because they either required too many strategic materials in their construction, had high maintainance requirements, were too complicated for rapid production, or simply cost too much money.

http://www.geocities.com/akdhc2pilot/yo-54.jpg
1941 YO-54

In 1938, the Germans brought their Fiesler FI-156 'Storch' to the U.S. for a public demonstration. The very-impressed onlookers included U.S. Army personnel and representatives from several aircraft manufacturers. Major General 'Hap' Arnold, by then appointed Chief of the Army Air Corps, recognized the possibilities of such an aircraft, so in 1940 the Army invited various manufacturers, including Stinson, to submit existing designs for field trials in order to assess the military potential of civilian aircraft. Among the planes tested were six Voyagers specially fitted with 100hp Franklin O-200-1 engines. These peppy little airplanes were designated YO-54's , the 'Y' meaning "evaluation status" and the 'O' meaning "observation" category. They performed and handled well enough that the Army ordered ten additional ones. They initially labelled the type AT-19A but the designation was ultimately changed to L-9A in 1942. Primarily used for training and coastal patrol work by the Civil Air Patrol and Civilian Pilot Training Program, this tiny fleet was eventually augmented by sixteen 90hp civilian models that were designated L-9B's.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/8f/Vmo1-WWII-insignia.jpg

Schmidt's problems of fire support distribution received some alleviation on 26 February when two Marine observation planes flew in from the escort carrier Wake Island, the first aircraft to land on Iwo's recaptured and still fire-swept main airstrip. These were Stinson OY single-engine observation planes, nicknamed "Grasshoppers," of Lieutenant Tom Rozga's Marine Observation Squadron (VMO) 4, and they were followed the next day by similar planes from Lieutenant Roy G. Miller's VMO-5. The intrepid pilots of these frail craft had already had an adventurous time in the waters off Iwo Jima. Several had been launched precariously from the experimental Brodie catapult on LST 776, "like a peanut from a slingshot." All 14 of the planes of these two observation squadrons would receive heavy Japanese fire in battle, not only while airborne but also while being serviced on the airstrips as well. Yet these two squadrons (and elements of VMO-1) would fly nearly 600 missions in support of all three divisions. Few units contributed so much to the eventual suppression of Kuribayashi's deadly artillery fire. In time the mere presence of these small planes overhead would influence Japanese gunners to cease fire and button up against the inevitable counterbattery fire to follow. Often the pilots would undertake pre-dawn or dusk missions simply to extend this protective "umbrella" over the troops, risky flying given Iwo's unlit fields and constant enemy sniping from the adjacent hills.

BillyTheKid_22
05-31-2007, 01:41 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/inlove.gif woofiedog is COOL!! http://media.ubi.com/us/forum_images/gf-glomp.gif and http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif I know other My friend Bobby's owner L-4 Grasshopper and Cessna 310R, Piper PA 25 Pawnee from Butler, Oklahoma. Very NICE!!! Soon, I will talk my friend Bobby from Butler,Oklahoma. My friend Bobby's Small Road land for plane and Big Ranch. Lot of FUN, I and My friend Bobby was flying L-4 Grasshopper!! Bobby's Father ex-Army Air Corp and WW 2 and Retired TWA Super G Constellation. Well cool!! Smile!!

icrash
05-31-2007, 02:18 PM
And I thought I had seen it all with the B-25 making a carrier trap. I stand corrected, now I think I've seen it all.

MidwestPunx1
05-31-2007, 02:41 PM
yea there is a grasshopper at an airport near here but i dont think it gets too much flight time..

Taylortony
05-31-2007, 02:59 PM
Indeed, this idea had been rejected until a chance meeting with a Naval officer on a train that had been looking into how to get aircraft over the beachead as spotters, and the rest is history................. one in the USA has been restored and is flying with the hook assembly fitted........

its still being developed today.......... they have done trials with a skyhook for the harrier so it can operate of merchant ships..

http://home.planet.nl/~alder010/Future/Future.html (http://home.planet.nl/%7Ealder010/Future/Future.html)

http://forum.keypublishing.co.uk/attachment.php?s=1bf99007a00055881286d132d5b34468&attachmentid=74040

http://home.planet.nl/~alder010/Future/skyhook-1.jpg

woofiedog
06-01-2007, 12:26 AM
Taylorcraft L-2

http://www.usaaf.net/has/jops/images/O57.gif

http://us.airliners.net/photos/middle/6/3/6/0880636.jpg

Links:
http://www.als-cannonfield.com/PictureGallery.htm
http://www.alliancememory.org/cdm4/results.php?CISOOP1=...T=/taylor&CISOBOX1=S (http://www.alliancememory.org/cdm4/results.php?CISOOP1=any&CISOFIELD1=CISOSEARCHALL&CISOROOT=/taylor&CISOBOX1=S)

BillyTheKid_22
06-01-2007, 01:34 AM
Thank you!!! woofiedog, http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif http://media.ubi.com/us/forum_images/gf-glomp.gif I e-mailed my friend Bobby!! I got email Bobby!! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif I know about Taylorcraft L-2!! My friend Bobby's owner Piper L-4 Grasshopper and Cessna 310R, Piper PA 25 Pawnee. Bobby say http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif!!! All time, I help him and Cool!!! My Dad's best friend Bobby with Small Centralview Elem.and Mangum High School at and Greer County Mangum, Oklahoma. Now Bobby live in Butler, Oklahoma. Bobby's 2 son and 5 Daugter Ranch. 4 years ago, Bobby's wife died and cancer.

woofiedog
06-01-2007, 02:04 AM
BillyTheKid_22... Hope you get a chance to go up with him sometime for a little sight seeing. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

John_Wayne_
06-01-2007, 05:26 AM
Fascinating stuff Woofiedog. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Go for it Billy - post us some pics when you get back http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

mortoma
06-02-2007, 04:44 PM
So can anyone please tell me what BillyTheKid_22 is trying to say?? The grammatical syntax errors are stifling my understanding. Some sentences have no structure to speak of. Raaaid is far easier to understand.

GreyFox5
06-02-2007, 08:25 PM
Don't forget the Aeroncia L-3
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v476/GreyFox5/800px-Aeronca_L-3B_Grasshopper_USAF.jpg

woofiedog
06-03-2007, 06:10 AM
Guess we can't leave out the Fieseler Fi 156 Storch either. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif


A bit different landing gear on this Storch... http://www.lemairesoft.happyhost.org/photo/avion1/102012011.jpg

http://www.asso4stormo.it/arc2/edv/EdV015.jpg

VFS-214_Hawk
06-03-2007, 06:57 AM
The good'ole days Stinson L-5 N67174 SUn-N-Fun 1991
http://a473.ac-images.myspacecdn.com/images01/21/l_ea1b03a981fa600e2b4110e7a88a35d0.jpg

VFS-214_Hawk
06-03-2007, 06:59 AM
I also so a pic somewhere were the L-4s had a hook on top. They would fly along side the ship and catch the hook then be pulled over to the ship. I have the book, will search for the pic.

VFS-214_Hawk
06-03-2007, 07:11 AM
Short takeo-off and Landing (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWDEYpqS0yw)

VFS-214_Hawk
06-03-2007, 07:13 AM
http://www.combatreform2.com/brodierig.jpg

VFS-214_Hawk
06-03-2007, 07:17 AM
Dont forget the YL-14
http://www.aerofiles.com/piper-YL14x.jpg

woofiedog
06-03-2007, 02:49 PM
VFS-214_Hawk.. Is that your Stinson? Very Nice! Cool video... Would like to see the photos from that book if you could. Thank's

VFS-214_Hawk
06-03-2007, 03:47 PM
The book I have is called The Fighting Grasshoppers by Ken Wakefield.

The Stinson belonged to my good friend Mike Wilson from Atlanta, Ga. I logged 50 hours in it before his health forced the sale of it. I too went off to collage so he didnt want to keep it. I took care of it for him for a little while. I flew it to Sun-N-Fun that year.

Pirschjaeger
06-04-2007, 10:42 AM
What's the point of a takeoff strip? They're Pipers. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Bow into the wind! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

woofiedog
06-04-2007, 07:37 PM
VFS-214_Hawk... You are fortunate to have such a friend. Sounds like you had a Great time with the Stinson though. My oldest brother flew and owned a 1947 tail dragger Cessna. He is passed away now... but I'll dig out a photo of it.
I went up with him a number of times. He flew out of Southbridge and Oxford airports here in Massachusetts from the early 70's... up till the late 80's.


BillyTheKid_22... Glad to hear of your flight time! LoL
Sound like you had a Blast buzzing around in that twin engine Cessna. Very Nice aircraft by the way.