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SeaNorris
06-26-2005, 05:49 PM
http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a27/-SeaNorris-/TargetTug.jpg
http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a27/-SeaNorris-/TargetTug1.jpg
http://www.sweptwings.co.uk/images/rafh_mof_tempest_v_1as.jpg

http://www.skinnersheaven.com

Located in the Milestones of Flight Hall at the Royal Air Force Museum, Hendon is Hawker Tempest V (NV778). This aircraft was on show for many years at Hendon before being removed for extensive restoration in 1991. Now located in the Milestones of Flight Hall, it looks superb in the target tug colours it wore while serving with 233 Operational Conversion Unit (OCU), it's last operational role.


The Hawker Tempest was derived from the earlier Typhoon; in an effort to boost the Typhoon‚¬īs performance at higher altitudes, it featured a thinner, smaller wing, an elongated forward fuselage and an enlarged vertical stabilizer. The improvements on the Typhoon, such as the bubble canopy and the flush-mounted Hispano Mk.V cannons, were also integrated. Basically, there were two versions: The Tempest Mk. V powered by a Napier Sabre in-line engine, and the Tempest Mk. II, powered by a Bristol Centaurus radial engine. Both took their time until declared ready for mass production. Especially the Mk. II only really got on the way after studies on a captured Focke-Wulf Fw 190 revealed a solution for the massive problems experienced in cooling a radial engine within a close-fitting forward fuselage..

Eventually, the Tempest Mk. V saw combat from April 1944 on, fighting V-1 buzz-bombs from English bases and then accompanying the advancing allied armies right into Germany. The Tempest Mk. II had been planned for use in the British Tiger Force in the far east, but hostilities ended before that force was deployed. With the general reduction in numbers, many Tempests were retired soon after the war; the RAF used it in limited numbers until 1951 with the advent of the jet fighters. Despite its comparatively short career, the Tempest earns distinction for having been the predecessor of the plane many claim to be the ultimate piston-engined fighter, the Hawker Fury and Sea Fury.

SeaNorris
06-26-2005, 05:49 PM
http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a27/-SeaNorris-/TargetTug.jpg
http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a27/-SeaNorris-/TargetTug1.jpg
http://www.sweptwings.co.uk/images/rafh_mof_tempest_v_1as.jpg

http://www.skinnersheaven.com

Located in the Milestones of Flight Hall at the Royal Air Force Museum, Hendon is Hawker Tempest V (NV778). This aircraft was on show for many years at Hendon before being removed for extensive restoration in 1991. Now located in the Milestones of Flight Hall, it looks superb in the target tug colours it wore while serving with 233 Operational Conversion Unit (OCU), it's last operational role.


The Hawker Tempest was derived from the earlier Typhoon; in an effort to boost the Typhoon‚¬īs performance at higher altitudes, it featured a thinner, smaller wing, an elongated forward fuselage and an enlarged vertical stabilizer. The improvements on the Typhoon, such as the bubble canopy and the flush-mounted Hispano Mk.V cannons, were also integrated. Basically, there were two versions: The Tempest Mk. V powered by a Napier Sabre in-line engine, and the Tempest Mk. II, powered by a Bristol Centaurus radial engine. Both took their time until declared ready for mass production. Especially the Mk. II only really got on the way after studies on a captured Focke-Wulf Fw 190 revealed a solution for the massive problems experienced in cooling a radial engine within a close-fitting forward fuselage..

Eventually, the Tempest Mk. V saw combat from April 1944 on, fighting V-1 buzz-bombs from English bases and then accompanying the advancing allied armies right into Germany. The Tempest Mk. II had been planned for use in the British Tiger Force in the far east, but hostilities ended before that force was deployed. With the general reduction in numbers, many Tempests were retired soon after the war; the RAF used it in limited numbers until 1951 with the advent of the jet fighters. Despite its comparatively short career, the Tempest earns distinction for having been the predecessor of the plane many claim to be the ultimate piston-engined fighter, the Hawker Fury and Sea Fury.

LStarosta
06-26-2005, 06:27 PM
The yellow and black stripes on your skin should be crisp, like the real aircraft.

SeaNorris
06-26-2005, 06:27 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by LStarosta:
The yellow and black stripes on your skin should be crisp, like the real aircraft. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

They are, on the 2nd photo there is a pic in the way http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

SeaNorris
06-26-2005, 06:32 PM
http://server2.uploadit.org/files/SeaNorris-TargetTug2.jpg

JG7_Rall
06-26-2005, 06:39 PM
He means shiny and glossy http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

SeaNorris
06-26-2005, 06:41 PM
I gave it weahtering, thats in a museum.

LStarosta
06-26-2005, 06:46 PM
Seriously though, your stripes have soft edges. The ones on the real airplane are like... precisely crisp.

SeaNorris
06-26-2005, 06:47 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by LStarosta:
Seriously though, your stripes have soft edges. The ones on the real airplane are like... precisely crisp. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I just notuced, I'll get around to it http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

bird_brain
06-26-2005, 06:52 PM
Not to mention that they are angled in the wrong direction. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

LStarosta
06-26-2005, 06:59 PM
And you forgot to put "78" on the bottom surface of the wing.

SeaNorris
06-26-2005, 07:01 PM
It was a genric one

heywooood
06-26-2005, 08:43 PM
what the he11 are you doing, SeaNorris!#!##!

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/mockface.gif

wayno7777
06-26-2005, 11:46 PM
Btw, The last piston engine fighter in RAF service was a Tempest VI, which was in use as a target tug when it was retired in 1953.
from http://www.faqs.org/docs/air/avcfury.html#m4

WTE_Ibis
06-27-2005, 03:06 AM
Jees you guys are tough on the poor bloke. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

-HH-Quazi
06-27-2005, 03:29 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by WTE_Ibis:
Jees you guys are tough on the poor bloke. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yes. And why in the world would they be? Do they know something that we don't? Like maybe why some of our favorite, best skinners that have ever graced any WWII flight sim communtiy are actually quitting because their hard work and creations are being stolen, trampled on and passed off with someone elses name on them.