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View Full Version : U 505 at Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago by jmanwell and bfogel



bfogel
04-13-2009, 11:53 PM
As promised, I am finally getting around to posting (most) of the pics that jmanwell and I took at Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry last month.
The true point of the ride was to travel from central Missouri to the Holland, Michigan vicinity to pick up a van I had purchased. jmanwell would be off on Friday about midnight and agreed to drive me up in his mini van, subject to certain conditions, to wit:
1. I would buy the gas
2. ditto on meals
3. we could hit the museum and see the boat!
This was a no brainer for a couple of silent hunters like us, sooo....
We agreed:
A. Drive through the night to arrive in Holland by 8:00 AM or so.
B. Pick up the van, return to Lansing, Illinois, park my van, get on the interstate north to the museum and try to arrive by noon as closing would be at 4:00 PM
Everything went pretty smooth and I even fired up "Das Boot" which is ripped to my tablet PC along with: The Enemy Below, Hunt for Red October, U-571, Run Silent, Run Deep, Crimson Tide, Down Periscope, K-19 and several more.
So, there we were,"Das Boot" on the screen between us, speakers ported out to the vans stereo and surrounded by the inky blackness of a cold winter night, punctuated from time to time by the lights of small Illinois towns, looking like so many glittering jewels carelessly tossed on a giant, gently rolling ocean of black velvet.
Later, mission objectives met in Holland we race North to the primary target for the day!
I had seen the boat decades ago in 1977 when it was simply set out side in the weather. My Grand mother had lived and worked in the Chicago area and I took her back for a visit to commemorate the fifty year anniversary of her departure in 1927.
We tried to hit all the highlights, and she showed me where she used to go to lunch at the Lincoln Hotel, where seeing Alphonse "Big Al" Capone and his posse across the dinning room was a common occurrence. She passed at 83 in 1985, but I always will remember that trip.
The submarine was moved into a specially built enclosure several years ago to protect it and preserve it for future generations to enjoy and learn from.
Something the tour guy said as he showed us through the boat still rings in my ears and gives me pause.
He remarked that "these boats were only built to last 4 or 5 years", and almost 70 years on, to be able to have an opportunity to actually go aboard is well... amazing really.
We had both hit the USS Silversides about a week apart last summer and she hasn't been out of the water for over 50 years. Perhaps we all need to send a buck or two towards the preservation and maintenance of some of these ever more fragile and aging warriors.
Now, back to our story...
Parking in the attached parking facility was a snap and we were there!
The whole museum is a very worthwhile day or three, but the clock was ticking and we were men on a mission. If you go there,try to allocate at least a full day for the place as follows: 1/2 day for the U505, 1/2 day for eating, toilet and everything else! My humble opinion.
Truth be told, there is a universe of interesting displays, interactive stuff and well designed, thought provoking presentations that could easily consume two or three days worth of time with no regrets!
The U505 itself is 5 stories down, so the display starts out with a walk through a winding wide hall way like and very informative series of large pictures and posters, hanging video displays and the like which serve to orient and inform a person that may have little or no true understanding of WWII, it's roots, participants and time frame. The information is delivered at just the right pace to allow time to absorb it and still feel like you are moving along.
The writers, videographers, and the whole concept does a great job of transporting the viewer to the time and place, properly informed and prepared to understand the nature of the display.
I will not here rob the reader of every facet of the presentation and steal thereby the pleasure of seeing it for your self, but rather show off some of the highlights and the submarine herself for those who, by virtue of distance, time and money, or more likely a combination of all three will likely never be able to see her in person.
Here then is a small part of the walking display, keeping in mind that there are voice, video and printed materials ... you don't stand in silence looking at static images.
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/276_2072.jpg
This is a life size diorama and extends to the horizon by incorporating a mural backdrop. Suddenly, being a survivor victim of the steam/electric eel seems a far less inviting prospect. Imagine adding winter temps, ice ....
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505StaticDisplaysurvivors-1.jpg
Here we see a mural of the boarding from a 26 foot whaleboat in Atlantic swells.
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/276_2079.jpg
Here jmanwell has captured a static Destroyer bridge display while a part of the video is running on the screen behind.
Great care was taken to recreate these events with actors that actually look like the original people involved and ALL dialog is from actual transcripts, no Hollywood license was allowed here.
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/276_2073.jpg
and another view..
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505staticdisplayDDBridgeScene-1.jpg
a different angle..
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505staticdisplayDDBridge-1.jpg
Moving along in the story, this provides some background for the time during which the sub was brought to Chicago.
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505staticdisplay1954poster-1.jpg
And finally, you round a corner and, suddenly ....
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505Firstview-1.jpg
you are presented with the whole presence of her, the room has suddenly expanded from a generous hallway to a massive, "submarine pen" like enclosure stretching away hundreds of feet and stories high. Not a person entering was passive or failed to be at once awestruck and visibly staggered by the sheer bulk of the space and the volume of the boat herself.
An Englishman would, I believe be "gob-smacked" by the moment!
Photos and even my video, fail to convey the same impact and pale in comparison to being there. Go if you can!
Upon recovering, the viewer moves to the left along the starboard side of the boat to begin a winding decent down a gentle, wide ramp leading to the belly of the beast, the main floor, almost dry dock-esq in scale and design.
You pass the conning tower, seen in the following several shots and suddenly realize that the irregular holes are those ripped by hot metal spit in anger by long ago pilots in another time, half a planet away.
Almost to a man now, they exist only as ever fainter memories, fading photographs and inked lines on yellowing paper, except here, where they live on, seen and known by tens of thousands of wide eyed children, nodding grandpas with knowing smiles and young men filled with a quest for glorious victories and narrow escapes against outrageous odds that they too, might become immortal this way.
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U5053qtrstrbdbow-1.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/276_2077.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505ConningTower3qtrfwd-1.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505AAAgun-1.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/276_2094.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/276_2099.jpg

I'm going to stop here for now so I can post this and be sure that everything is looking the way I want.
There is a lot more to see, and I'll be showing it right here, but the first time I tried to do this, I was going to post an album.
After lots of work, a two digit typist here, and organizing all the pictures, poof, I could not find it anywhere!
It wasn't complete either, but I don't want to do a lot of work for naught.
So here goes!
I guess if you're reading this, well... it must have worked.
Oh, by the way, if the previous 'Album' did post somewhere, and you found it, let me know where it is so I can finish it, delete it or???
Hope you have enjoyed so far!

bfogel
04-13-2009, 11:53 PM
As promised, I am finally getting around to posting (most) of the pics that jmanwell and I took at Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry last month.
The true point of the ride was to travel from central Missouri to the Holland, Michigan vicinity to pick up a van I had purchased. jmanwell would be off on Friday about midnight and agreed to drive me up in his mini van, subject to certain conditions, to wit:
1. I would buy the gas
2. ditto on meals
3. we could hit the museum and see the boat!
This was a no brainer for a couple of silent hunters like us, sooo....
We agreed:
A. Drive through the night to arrive in Holland by 8:00 AM or so.
B. Pick up the van, return to Lansing, Illinois, park my van, get on the interstate north to the museum and try to arrive by noon as closing would be at 4:00 PM
Everything went pretty smooth and I even fired up "Das Boot" which is ripped to my tablet PC along with: The Enemy Below, Hunt for Red October, U-571, Run Silent, Run Deep, Crimson Tide, Down Periscope, K-19 and several more.
So, there we were,"Das Boot" on the screen between us, speakers ported out to the vans stereo and surrounded by the inky blackness of a cold winter night, punctuated from time to time by the lights of small Illinois towns, looking like so many glittering jewels carelessly tossed on a giant, gently rolling ocean of black velvet.
Later, mission objectives met in Holland we race North to the primary target for the day!
I had seen the boat decades ago in 1977 when it was simply set out side in the weather. My Grand mother had lived and worked in the Chicago area and I took her back for a visit to commemorate the fifty year anniversary of her departure in 1927.
We tried to hit all the highlights, and she showed me where she used to go to lunch at the Lincoln Hotel, where seeing Alphonse "Big Al" Capone and his posse across the dinning room was a common occurrence. She passed at 83 in 1985, but I always will remember that trip.
The submarine was moved into a specially built enclosure several years ago to protect it and preserve it for future generations to enjoy and learn from.
Something the tour guy said as he showed us through the boat still rings in my ears and gives me pause.
He remarked that "these boats were only built to last 4 or 5 years", and almost 70 years on, to be able to have an opportunity to actually go aboard is well... amazing really.
We had both hit the USS Silversides about a week apart last summer and she hasn't been out of the water for over 50 years. Perhaps we all need to send a buck or two towards the preservation and maintenance of some of these ever more fragile and aging warriors.
Now, back to our story...
Parking in the attached parking facility was a snap and we were there!
The whole museum is a very worthwhile day or three, but the clock was ticking and we were men on a mission. If you go there,try to allocate at least a full day for the place as follows: 1/2 day for the U505, 1/2 day for eating, toilet and everything else! My humble opinion.
Truth be told, there is a universe of interesting displays, interactive stuff and well designed, thought provoking presentations that could easily consume two or three days worth of time with no regrets!
The U505 itself is 5 stories down, so the display starts out with a walk through a winding wide hall way like and very informative series of large pictures and posters, hanging video displays and the like which serve to orient and inform a person that may have little or no true understanding of WWII, it's roots, participants and time frame. The information is delivered at just the right pace to allow time to absorb it and still feel like you are moving along.
The writers, videographers, and the whole concept does a great job of transporting the viewer to the time and place, properly informed and prepared to understand the nature of the display.
I will not here rob the reader of every facet of the presentation and steal thereby the pleasure of seeing it for your self, but rather show off some of the highlights and the submarine herself for those who, by virtue of distance, time and money, or more likely a combination of all three will likely never be able to see her in person.
Here then is a small part of the walking display, keeping in mind that there are voice, video and printed materials ... you don't stand in silence looking at static images.
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/276_2072.jpg
This is a life size diorama and extends to the horizon by incorporating a mural backdrop. Suddenly, being a survivor victim of the steam/electric eel seems a far less inviting prospect. Imagine adding winter temps, ice ....
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505StaticDisplaysurvivors-1.jpg
Here we see a mural of the boarding from a 26 foot whaleboat in Atlantic swells.
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/276_2079.jpg
Here jmanwell has captured a static Destroyer bridge display while a part of the video is running on the screen behind.
Great care was taken to recreate these events with actors that actually look like the original people involved and ALL dialog is from actual transcripts, no Hollywood license was allowed here.
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/276_2073.jpg
and another view..
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505staticdisplayDDBridgeScene-1.jpg
a different angle..
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505staticdisplayDDBridge-1.jpg
Moving along in the story, this provides some background for the time during which the sub was brought to Chicago.
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505staticdisplay1954poster-1.jpg
And finally, you round a corner and, suddenly ....
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505Firstview-1.jpg
you are presented with the whole presence of her, the room has suddenly expanded from a generous hallway to a massive, "submarine pen" like enclosure stretching away hundreds of feet and stories high. Not a person entering was passive or failed to be at once awestruck and visibly staggered by the sheer bulk of the space and the volume of the boat herself.
An Englishman would, I believe be "gob-smacked" by the moment!
Photos and even my video, fail to convey the same impact and pale in comparison to being there. Go if you can!
Upon recovering, the viewer moves to the left along the starboard side of the boat to begin a winding decent down a gentle, wide ramp leading to the belly of the beast, the main floor, almost dry dock-esq in scale and design.
You pass the conning tower, seen in the following several shots and suddenly realize that the irregular holes are those ripped by hot metal spit in anger by long ago pilots in another time, half a planet away.
Almost to a man now, they exist only as ever fainter memories, fading photographs and inked lines on yellowing paper, except here, where they live on, seen and known by tens of thousands of wide eyed children, nodding grandpas with knowing smiles and young men filled with a quest for glorious victories and narrow escapes against outrageous odds that they too, might become immortal this way.
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U5053qtrstrbdbow-1.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/276_2077.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505ConningTower3qtrfwd-1.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505AAAgun-1.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/276_2094.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/276_2099.jpg

I'm going to stop here for now so I can post this and be sure that everything is looking the way I want.
There is a lot more to see, and I'll be showing it right here, but the first time I tried to do this, I was going to post an album.
After lots of work, a two digit typist here, and organizing all the pictures, poof, I could not find it anywhere!
It wasn't complete either, but I don't want to do a lot of work for naught.
So here goes!
I guess if you're reading this, well... it must have worked.
Oh, by the way, if the previous 'Album' did post somewhere, and you found it, let me know where it is so I can finish it, delete it or???
Hope you have enjoyed so far!

HW3
04-14-2009, 03:17 AM
Yes it worked! awesome pictures.

Celeon999
04-14-2009, 03:27 AM
Hope you guys had fun http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif


Looking forward to the other photos aswell.


Here is a time lapse video on youtube that shows how U-505 was moved into the hall where it is on display today. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Moving U-505 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DUuQIpVuhCg)

mariuszj1939
04-14-2009, 05:11 AM
Thank you ! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

bfogel
04-14-2009, 06:29 PM
Hey guys!
Glad to be able to share!
More pics coming soon, perhaps this evening (Missouri, USA)
I have washed the pics through some photo software to lighten them up some as it is a low light environment and a lil challenging to shoot in.
We both had still/video capability on our cameras and on "Museum" setting, mine was fine.
jmanwell on the other hand was a lil flustered and re-shot most of his shots trying to get some light enough to use. I have lightened them up and am very pleased with the clarity we have got on them now.
I was using Ulead Photo Express6 to prep them with great results!
The VLR (My wife) can do amazing stuff with it, I dabble.
In any event, if you get the opportunity to go, a few minutes with the user guide for your camera will be a worthwhile interlude and assure the old adage: Success favors the prepared mind!
jmanwell has diligently studied his manual and now can shoot a black object in an unlit cave with his eyes closed and get the shot every time.
I guess we'll be going back!
I asked him to post some of his camera findings here and I'm sure he will.
More later!
B

tambor198
04-14-2009, 07:17 PM
Very nice pics, bfogel and jmanwell. Alot better than some of the ones that I took when Mr Grayson and I were there. I've also added a link to this thread in the WW II Submarines On Public Display sticky under the U-505.



Nice job !!! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

bfogel
04-14-2009, 09:46 PM
So, back with more!
Glad to hear that you Captains are enjoying this so far. We both wish we could have had a lot more time and were basically chased out as it was.
I can't wait to take the VLR and the very girly girls up there for a good look 'round!
So I'll pick it up back on the ramp.
They do not allow access to the conning tower or deck for obvious reasons so they have built a partial mock up and set it on the floor for a close look and a hands on with a couple of scopes etc. From the ramp, you can see down into it like this.
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/276_2090.jpg

Looking up at the real thing from down there gets you this view:
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505Conningtowerlowangle-1.jpg

Moving around to the bow and working back and around to the entry on the port side we got some great shots of the simulated torpedo firing and the bow planes, free flood areas in the bow and so on.
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505Fwdtorpedofreefloodarea-1.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/276_2160-1.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505Bowplane-1.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505anchor-1.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505statictorplaunch1-1.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505statictorplaunch2-1.jpg

Her we see jmanwell getting the tough shots! You can get an idea about the dim lighting in some areas. No doubt, the designers of the display didn't think that anyone would want to see this side. We did!
It was interesting to touch and see the very tubes that brought so much pride to this boat and so much grief to their Merchant targets.
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/jmanwellshootsbow.jpg

Next the Stern and some of the static displays. But as those that have been can tell you, we only chip away at the paint here, there is so much to see!

bfogel
04-14-2009, 10:39 PM
Moving aft, we come to the props, stern planes and rudders. You just had to be there.
Staring up at all this bulk seeming suspended above you truly gives one a feel for the mass, the weighty bulk of all this engineering, invention and execution that resulted in the success that these craft enjoyed early on and even at the end were a menacing force to be reckoned with ... and respected!
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505StrbQtrlow-1.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505Sterntubesandsteeringgear-1.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/276_2111.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/276_2110.jpg

They no longer allow photos inside or aboard, and they have made a few grudging modifications to accommodate the Victors (that's us ... U.S., lest we forget, this is after all a war trophy) and their stooping backs as they move through.
The modifications are neat, thoughtful and don't "destroy" the feel of the boat. For example, upon entering just aft of the fwd torpedo room bulkhead and hatch, into the Petty officers quarters, there is room for ten or so to gather and listen to the tour guide get started. The port side petty officers bunks are removed and installed as a static display on the floor, or there would be no room for ten people to be there. The Control Room hatch is there but the bottom of the curving lip on the bulkhead has been cut away neatly so there is no hatch to step through. The little old ladies would never make it! Same with the aft control room bulkhead hatch, but you hardly notice.
There is a light and sound program together with a well done tour that gives a remarkably good immersion experience into life aboard.
Here are some of the static displays of the galley, Petty Officers bunks, guns and more.

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505PettyOfciersBerths-1.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505Kitchen1-1.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505Kitchen2-1.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/276_2122.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/276_2146-1.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505staticdisplayAAAgun-1.jpg

There are some other fine displays as well. This is Navy fighter flying gear of the type worn by the pilots supporting the takedown mission.
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505staticdisplayUSNPilot-1.jpg

Here is "Enigma" the code machine the Germans were sure could not be compromised. The quiet, scholarly heroes at Bletchley Park, proved again, that military secrets are the most fleeting.
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505UltraCodeMachine-1.jpg

There is also a complete periscope in a horizontal display, the better to see it fully, but I hope the reader will forgive me rotating the picture to the proper orientation as so few ever have or will see the real thing, in it's place, altogether and feeling good!
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/276_2143-1.jpg

I'll post some more of the museum itself to lend a flavor to the great place it is, and the myriad of "stuff" we saw, if ever so briefly!
That'll be tomorrow, though as it is once again "late".
I hope you have at least an idea of the great work done to save what was to be a torpedo target in the early 1950's. That would have been a tragedy of loss for the nation and the world.
Celeon, thanks for the youtube vid, it's on the disc that we got in the gift shop, a worthwhile purchase.
I mentioned to jmanwell that perhaps we ought to send the disc "around the world". He was very quiet.
We shall see. Closing for now, more to come!
Go if you can, stay as long as you can then zip up the coast to see the Silversides in Michigan.

bfogel
04-14-2009, 11:17 PM
Remember...
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505blackout.jpg

Remember, I will still be here,
As long as you hold me, in your memory

Remember, when your dreams have ended,
Time can be transcended,
Just remember me

I am the one star that keeps burning, so brightly,
It is the last light, to fade into the rising sun

I'm with you,
Whenever you tell,
My story,
For I am all I've done

Remember, I will still be here,
As long as you hold me, in your memory,
Remember me

I am that one voice, in the cold wind,
That whispers,
And if you listen, you'll hear me call across the sky

As long as,
I still can reach out, and touch you,
Then I will never die

Remember, I'll never leave you,
If you will only,
Remember me

Remember me...

Remember, I will still be here,
As long as you hold me,
In your memory

Remember,
When your dreams have ended,
Time can be transcended,
I live forever,
Remember me

Remember me,
Remember... me...

That's Josh Groban's theme from the movie "Troy". Listen when you can, shout when you're shallow!
It haunts me, and I thought it was fitting.
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U505blackout.jpg

bfogel
04-15-2009, 12:14 AM
For those who would like to hear the song, here is a youtube link to a collage set to the piece.
It is well done, crank it up and enjoy!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uv13OWhBgtY

"Remember me" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uv13OWhBgtY)

Note: this is NOT "Remember when it rained", thats another Groban piece. Different. Not the one I refereed to.

jmanwell
04-15-2009, 01:20 AM
Indeed, the museum did an outstanding job putting the U-505 on display. Nothing can compare to walking around the corner and seeing the U-505 nestled in its underground sub pen. However, as bfogel has stated, it is very low light in there for photography. Since there is a chance I might be able to go back later this year, I took a little time, got some books from the local library, and studied low light photography principles. I then broke out the manual for my digital camera (after having the camera for 4 years and never reading the manual) and commenced to learn how to adjust the settings that I had read about. Some things I learned (I am by no means a professional this is just from reading and experimenting with my camera) for low light shots are as follows:

1. Learn to adjust the aperture. This is denoted by the f stop number. This number is backwards from what one might think. The higher the F stop the less amount of light being let in.
2. Slower shutter speeds. Slowing the shutter allows more light to flow in. This is usually denoted by a fraction of or whole seconds.
3. ISO sensitivity. Usually digital cameras will allow you to set the ISO. The only thing I know about this is don't set it at the highest number. Keep it at least one step below. If set at the highest ISO setting, your pictures will tend to become "noisy" especially in low light shots.
4. Keep the camera still. If you are able to, take a tripod with you, if not try resting on a railing, leaning on a wall, etc.
5. Focusing. I tend to keep the camera in a Landscape setting. Most digital cameras have "infinity" focus on Landscape setting. Although it is not quite "infinite."
6. Practice, Practice, Practice. The nice thing about digital cameras is you can take all the practice shots you want; then delete them.

If you plan to visit the U-505 and are planning on taking lots of pics, just make sure you learn to adjust settings on your camera and maybe read a little about low light shooting. I hope with what I have read and practiced, if I go back to the U-505, my pics the second time will be better than the first.
Also bfogel said, "Go if you can, stay as long as you can then zip up the coast to see the Silversides in Michigan." This depends on which coast you zip up. If you follow the coast towards Michigan, you can see the Silversides in Muskegon (I believe me and bfogel posted some pics of the Silversides on the SH4 forum). However, if you follow the coast pretty much due North, you can see the ***** in Manitowoc, Wisconsin. I believe the Silversides is the most decorated sub to survive the war, but the *****, I think, is the most fully restored U.S. submarine from the war. The choice, of course, is yours.

Mittelwaechter
04-15-2009, 07:47 AM
Thanks for sharing and for the formidable information.

Great thread! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

tssummers45
04-15-2009, 05:38 PM
Awesome pics,thx for sharing!

tambor198
04-15-2009, 08:05 PM
Great job, guys, you've done a terrific job. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

bfogel
04-16-2009, 08:49 PM
A few last Submarine pictures and then ....
Hey all,
Here are some more Pics that were rescued from dark-grainy-itis and are not too hard to look at.
These are another look at some of the above sights, some with a different angle or perspective.
Some of these are additional shots of the boat and related static displays, some are the info-hallway-approach, but keep in mind, this is still a small look and in no way an in depth photo study ... there is a lot to see!
So, this will prep you far more than spoil it for you, and I say again, go if you can, spend as much time as you can, then eat, sleep and toilet some other time!
As jmanwell has said, just to the North a couple of hours up the west side of the Lake is venerable *****, waiting for you!
Up the east side of the Lake, Silversides calls out for your footfalls upon her decks.
Is there another place in the world with such a concentration of WWII "wearable" submarines?
The day may come when these may be viewed only from without, and you will hold your manhood cheap, who did not attend while the time was fullness!
Right, who's on for a night on Silversides in August? Come ON, Step out front there!
RIGHT, time for a bribe! I'll bring the doughnuts!
Not just doughnuts, not some cheap, made the other week ago and trucked in from Timbuktu! Not some half baked, doughy, weak, crumbly piece of ...junk .... that's junque for the Frenchies!
No, me hearties, I speak of the Krispy Kreme. Fresh! Hot! Glazed! Served with a cup of standup Navy style coffee!
Yeah. I thought that would do it!
Very Good!
Now for the pictures!
Jumping back to the intro hallway walk through for a moment, I have some additional stuff as well as some new stuff!

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/StaticU-505Display13.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/StaticU-505Display5.jpg

Here are some additional angles of the simulated Torp firing.
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U-5056.jpg

and
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U-5057.jpg

and related things too:

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U-5051.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U-5055.jpg

And of course, what good are tubes with out something to shoot out of them?
Many of you are curious about that long, round, hard tube. What makes it the way it is? What makes it work like that? How does it blow at the end of the mission? What mysterious forces control is speed, direction and resilience? Why is the "head" different from the rest of the shaft or tube? What about the other end?

Some of you are wondering about torpedoes too.
So here's what we got!

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/Torpedo1.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/Torpedo2.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/Torpedo3.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/Torpedo4.jpg

The bits and pieces each have their own lure and points of interest.

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/StaticU-505Display14.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/StaticU-505Display4.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/StaticU-505Display1.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/StaticU-505Display7.jpg

And another look at defensive armament is always worthwhile:

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U-5052.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/StaticU-505Display2.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/StaticU-505Display12.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/AAA.jpg

Hedge hogs and depth charges are something to consider when you travel "below" in time of war!

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/StaticU-505Display15.jpg

Or you might wind up like this:

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/StaticU-505Display8.jpg

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/StaticU-505Display9.jpg

Go here to call for help, make a report .... or get one!
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/StaticU-505Display6.jpg

Use this to keep communications secure..... yeah, right!
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/StaticU-505Display3.jpg

Wear this:

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/StaticU-505Display10.jpg

Here is the ramp back up from the main floor to access the entrance(fwd) and the steps leading from the exit(aft) as well as about the only good view of the port side.

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U-5053.jpg

This must be an over flow or heavy crowd day ramp and was not in use on the day that we were there. The entrance which brings you into the boat just aft of the fwd bulkhead is seen at the top of this ramp. We had to walk around the stern and up the alternate ramp for our tour.

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/U-5058.jpg

As for the tour.
Alright, lets call a spade a spade!
The numb-nutted pimply faced, here for the season, public school, Mack-Donalds/Burger-kingly used to be, darn sure WASN"T going to "enlighten" ME, a Silent Hunter (1) player from 1996, with SHII AND the Pacific Aces conversion for same on his tablet PC, a many mission-ed SHIII "PRO", a guy with SH4, a guy with lots of actual "books" about submarines, u-boats and other related stuff, a guy with jmanwell in tow, a well versed u-booter in his own right! That "kid" wasn't going to tell us "spit" that we hadn't already learned, forgotten and remembered again, all without drugs, therapy or alcohol, mind you!
We're on frackkin u-boat FORUMS, by Neptunes trident! ........

OK ..... so the tour was ....
well.....
GREAT!
Informative!
Immersive!
Thought provoking-ive!
Intertaining!
touchy,
feel-ey,
"in there"
Historic!
Cramped! Which was cool(accurate)! I always thought that those old black and white movies from 1940's Hollywood showing huge control rooms, almost Cruiser size, and gray haired old line German Officers in full dress surface fleet uniforms striding these roomy decks to the 'scope were comically flawed!

The tour guy was well informed, accurate and interesting to listen to. We learned stuff!
Considering his audience could range from actual veterans to grand mothers from Norway and a kid from Uganda, his presentation clearly painted with a broad brush, but I would still go again!
We are still talking about it!
I was WRONG about the tour guy, and happily so!
Oh, by the way, he did not have pimples nor did he mention any fast food employment experience.
Just for the record.
I had a chance to chat briefly with him before his next tour started and told him how bad we thought it might be and how really good it was.
He was interested in my experiences and input, wondering if there was anything he might add or change.
I'm not usually at a loss for words, and still I told him that I honestly couldn't see anything that could or should be done any differently, considering the time and space constraints.
I'm not claustrophobic and have been aboard a number of Subs from the U-boat to boomers and a fast attack, but I can sure tell you that I would not want to be in a type IX or a type VII with an Allied Sub Chaser task force working on me! Must have been Hell!

Well, that's actually it.
I will post again down there with some other pics from the Museum that are not related to the U 505, but will give the reader a flavor of the balance of the displays.
I guess you need something to look at when you are on your way into the 505 and when you leave! Kidding!
It is some equally great stuff, though not equal in most respects!
On behalf of jmanwell and me, we hope we have been able to illustrate and entertain, fascinate and pique your interest!
I have some digital video footage "inside" the boat, don't tell!
If I can figure out how, I'll post on ??? youtube???
Lil help here guys!
This will be still cam video. The cam shoots fantastic stills and good video, but not 1st quality.
Open to suggestions. It's a bit of an up angle as they don't allow interior pics any more, some Dolt tried to "sell" 505 pictures, so now we're all done!
I made sure to be last in the tour and held the cam pointing backward, behind me at about "straining-ly tight belt" level (hey, I had a big lunch ... for several years) as we all moved into the Con, so it ended up getting a lot of upward angles, but watchable.
Then again through the engine rooms and up to the after torpedo room bulkhead, where you exit.
Let us hear from you and hey, it's time to vote!
DO it!
B
http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x305/bfogel/MainArea2.jpg

jmanwell
04-17-2009, 01:25 AM
Reading through my post on taking low light photography, I realized I forgot something. Also remember to watch the White Balance in your camera. Usually it is set to Auto which works 80-90% of the time. If you are going to see the U-505, there is a lot of orange glow from the lights there. Something like what one might see from some ordinary household light bulbs. A White Balance set to Auto may not always work in that particular situation. Because of this there are usually several other settings including: Daylight, Cloudy, Fluorescent, Shade, and Tungsten. Tungsten is the setting that usually corrects the orange effect on indoor pics. But with digital cameras, take several pics on all the settings to see which gives the best result and stick with that. All cameras function the same way, but not all act the same.

Also, while me and bfogel were at the museum, I picked up their dvd on the U-505. It is a great dvd filled with the story of the capture, sub tour, photos from the capture, interviews with the people involved in making the artwork. When I got the dvd home, I couldn't wait to play it and relive the experience; however, to my dismay, my dvd player wouldn't play it. My dvd player is 4-5 yrs. old and nothing lasts forever. I decided to make a backup of the dvd to see if it would play that. My dvd player played it perfectly. Now, my dvd player will play the original for what reason I know not. Since I have a backup, I have been thinking about sending it to anyone who would like to see the inside of the U-505 since it gives a brief sub tour. I am thinking of those specifically "across the pond" who may not ever be able to make it to the States to see it in person. When I made the backup, I made it region free; plus, I don't think there is any foreign languages on it. It is only in English. If any of you might be interested in seeing this video, PM me, and I will make a decision based on the response I get. If after seeing it, you really want it. Here is the link to the museum site to purchase it. It is definitely worth getting!

http://enssc.com/Products.aspx...e=519&product=102406 (http://enssc.com/Products.aspx?store=519&product=102406)

uniquewave
04-19-2009, 11:03 AM
I have been to this museum and have taken many very similar pictures. This is a breathtaking exibit like it has been said. When you walk from that hallway and see down the length of the Type IX it is just like, "wow". If i go to the Silversides this summer i will post pics.

bfogel
04-20-2009, 08:58 AM
I hope you make it.
Watch the clock though!
We arrived in time to go through as a family, and were able to choose with or without a tour guide. We went without, which was cool!
My plan was to shepherd the family through and then to go back alone and really see stuff!
I thought they would be open longer than they were and as we finished up, they were closing down!
Now I have to go back too!
You might pay heed to jmanwells photo related posts above for some good hints and tips!
Any idea when you may get there?
B

Kaleun1961
07-16-2009, 10:54 AM
K-61 is leaving Monday morning, from Milton, just west of Toronto, on a beeline to U-505! I'm taking my youngest daughter with me for a three week car driving vacation through the U.S. as a graduation present to her. Chicago and U-505 are our first destination, then down to Texas to visit my friends, whose son next year is marrying my eldest daughter, after she graduates university. We'll spend some time visiting in Texas, then we hope to travel through the southern states, visiting Graceland and the Grand Ole Opry on our way over to visit a friend in Virginia, as well as get in a few visits to some Civil War sites as well. I've also been currently reading a few books about the Revolutionary War and I suppose I could incorporate some of them in my travels, as well.

Anybody have any suggestions as to what I might find of interest between Texas and Virginia, in terms of Civil War and naval sites? I'd appreciate any suggestions; I'd really love to get aboard a US Navy aircraft carrier or one of the Iowa BB's. Heck, even an old WW2 sub will do, in addition, of course, to my intended visit to U-505.

Thanks for the great pics of U-505, guys! I'm really revved up for this trip. I just put my '06 Dodge Charger into the shop for a couple of days: new brakes, tranny and differential service, front end alignment, new high quality Goodyear tires. My red rocket is ready for launch [and no, I do not mean anything dirty by that phraseology!]

P.S. I don't have a DVD player in my car, but I'm taking my 17" widescreen laptop, and I guess the motels these days have DVD players in them? One way or another, Das Boot Director's Cut will be viewed at least once during this trip. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif I'm also taking my entire library of Dwight Yoakam and Johnny Cash CDs to play on my car's Boston Acoustics premium sound system. Somehow I am just not into MP3s; I like my music on good "old" CDs. That stereo kicks; when I crank it up the mirrors shake and the door panels pop! My daughter's also a country and western fan, so we'll both enjoy the ride. It's her idea to visit the Grand Ole Opry. My Dad has been there a few times; he even saw Hank Snow play there; that's going back a few years. I'm thinking I'd also like to visit the cemetery where Johnny Cash is buried and pay my respects to the best story telling singer in American history [my personal opinion, of course.]

Messervy
07-16-2009, 03:58 PM
Have a nice tour. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

tuddley3
07-17-2009, 02:10 PM
Ahh geg geg geg geg, blow me down !!!
http://the-working-man.com/popeye.jpg

I totally missed this thread while I was MIA. This is cooooooooll!!!!!!!!!!!

Kaleun1961
07-21-2009, 09:30 PM
I took my daughter today. U-505 looks quite good since her capture in 1944. Getting aboard her was worth the eight hour drive, but I was saddened that we weren't allowed to take pics inside the sub. Still, it gave me goosebumps to see those controls and gauges from SH3 become real in front of me and I could touch them. I had a very distinct sense of deja vu. I took some pics with my old digital camera but I doubt I'll post any, simply because this thread has covered the subject quite well.

I also bought a few souvenirs, including a coffee mug and shot glass, and "The U-Boat Commander's Handbook." It's a translation into English of an original German publication from 1942-1943. I can really feel for those U-boat men as I read its pages. Here's an example of some of the advice contained in the manual:

"When to Transmit Messages.

70.] Messages for the transmission of which no special time has been fixed should be transmited, as far as possible, in the evening or during the night, and before important changes of position, in order to frustrate a possible reaction of the enemy to a bearing by sending into action antisubmarine or aircraft, or by diverting ships or convoys."

Just the cited example conveys the sense how carefully a radioman had to use his equipment. As we know, the Allies developed miniaturized "Huff Duff" sets that could be deployed by escorts at sea. Further into the manual it becomes clear that the Germans simply didn't know how advanced Allied detector sets had become, as they mention the possibility of large sets in England but make no speculation about detectors aboard ships at sea. More than one U-boat was surprised during the war, seeing a destroyer suddenly hauling straight at them doing 30 knots down their bearing. Their radios had betrayed their positions, with deadly precise fixes.

tuddley3
07-22-2009, 03:32 PM
You lucky dog you, I'm jealous http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif