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Waldo.Pepper
02-12-2007, 07:32 PM
All this is from the a.b.p.a. newsgroup.


First the pilots stories

=====

Deadly day avoided at Cape airport
Saturday, February 3, 2007
By TJ Greaney ~ Southeast Missourian


Sheldon Stone made an emergency landing at Cape Girardeau Regional
Airport early Friday. He and his co-pilot depressurized the plane when the
windshield shattered, but they then lost consciousness. The tail damage
occurred while they were unconscious.
(Kit Doyle)
[Click to enlarge]
The twin-engine plane was diving toward the ground Friday morning at a speed
of well over 400 miles per hour. Its pilot and co-pilot were unconscious
from oxygen deprivation.
The plane's nose was tilted down and in about 15 seconds would collide with
the earth northwest of Cape Girardeau.

Death seemed certain.

But pilot Sheldon Stone and co-pilot Adam Moore are alive today.

"We must have had angels on our shoulders, that's all I can say," said
Stone, who flies the plane for the owner of Summit Bank of Arkansas and has
about 4,200 hours of flying experience.

Shortly after the plane took off from Rogers, Ark., en route to Shenandoah,
Va., the windshield of the cockpit shattered. The pilots, who were the only
people on board, don't know what caused that, but they immediately
depressurized the cabin.

"We were both worried the windshield would blow out. If that happened, we
would be dead immediately," Stone said.

Stone and Moore took the plane off autopilot and reached for the
"heavy-duty" oxygen masks mounted on the plane's ceiling.

Stone twisted a valve to begin the flow of oxygen. The pressurized tank in
the rear should have promptly started because the plane was above 12,500
feet.

But it didn't.

So Stone pulled on straps at the side of the mask, a type of manual override
to force air flow.

Still nothing.

"We were both getting drunk really fast. I remember thinking, really slowly,
'Hey, I'm not getting any oxygen, what's wrong here?' But I was so loony
already at that point I couldn't even solve the problem if it could be
solved," he said. "I just sort of thought to myself, 'I've got to hurry,'
but everything was fading."

For the next 60 seconds everything went black.

Over the course of that time, the plane plummeted from 27,000 feet to 7,000
feet.

Then Stone got a rush of blood to the head. He woke up.

"My first thought, I mean, you're still so loony, I remember thinking, 'Why
is this plane going so fast?'" he said.

Stone grabbed the throttle and pulled the nose skyward.

The craft stopped falling, but a great deal of damage had been done.
Somewhere during the descent, the left portion of the tail, which houses the
elevator and horizontal stabilizer, ripped off. Each wing was warped in an
upside-down V shape due to the G-force exerted on them.

Stone radioed air-traffic control in Memphis and was told the closest
airport was Cape Girardeau. He was exhilarated to be alive, but quickly had
to get serious.

"I thought I was home free, but then I realize how hard it was to get the
plane under control and I started to think, 'Wait a minute. This thing isn't
over yet. I've got to find a way to land.'"

Just keeping the plane horizontal was a struggle. When Stone accelerated,
pressure pushed the nose upward, but when the pilot slowed down the craft,
its nose pitched downward and the pilot had to yank it back.

Eventually, they decided on a speed of 160 knots and began easing the plane
in for a landing.

Within five minutes of the call to Memphis, the plane was visible at Cape
Girardeau Regional Airport. It landed without incident and before the
emergency responders could reach the scene.

"I'd say it was a supremely good landing," said chief controller Larry
Davis. "I see student pilots make worse landings every day."

And when they saw the battered, broken plane, their jaws dropped.

"This is one of the most incredible stories I've ever heard," said airport
manager Bruce Loy.

Today, the plane sits off the landing strip marked off by yellow tape. Its
wings are warped and engine likely fried. It likely won't ever fly again,
said airport officials.

But for those who it carried to safety, the plane means something special.

"That plane has Christian background," Stone said.

The plane's former owner was an Assembly of God Christian association. Its
registration number, N777AG, had biblical significance combining a holy
number and an abbreviation for Assembly of God.

The church kept the number when they sold the plane to Stone's boss but
suggested the new owners might replace it with "AJ" for "Assembly of Jesus."

They did, and Friday the little King Air 200 pulled off a miracle.

"I'm just thanking God. I'm very thankful to be alive today," Stone said.

=====

Now the NTSB's opinion.

=====

NTSB Identification: CHI07LA063
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, February 02, 2007 in Cape Girardeau, MO
Aircraft: Raytheon Aircraft Company B200, registration: N777AJ
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain
errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final
report has been completed.

On February 2, 2007, about 1030 central standard time, a Raytheon
Aircraft Company B200, N777AJ, sustained substantial damage during an
uncontrolled descent and recovery from cruise at flight level 270.
Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident.
The flightcrew reported that they depressurized the airplane after
noticing cracking of the airplane windshield. They then donned their
oxygen masks but were unable to obtain oxygen from the oxygen system
resulting in their loss of consciousness. They later regained
consciousness, recovered from the descent, and landed without further
incident at Cape Girardeau Regional Airport, Cape Girardeau, Missouri.
The 14 CFR Part 91 flight was operating on an instrument rules flight
plan. The pilot and copilot were uninjured. The flight originated from
Rogers Municipal Airport-Carter Field, Rogers, Arkansas, at 0939.

On-scene inspection of the airplane noted that approximately 2/3 of the
left horizontal stabilizer and elevator were separated from the aircraft
and 2/3 of the right elevator was separated but attached at the inboard
hinge. The left and right wings were wrinkled. The left pilot windshield
outer and inner ply were intact. The inner ply exhibited a shattered
appearance with a crack at the lower right hand corner of the
windshield. The cabin pressurization dump switch was in the dump
position.

The oxygen system worked when it was functionally tested in accordance
with Airplane Flight Manual.


=====

Now some pictures.

=====

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/king%20air/KA1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/king%20air/KA3.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/king%20air/KA4.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/king%20air/KA5.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/king%20air/KA6.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/king%20air/KA7.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/king%20air/KA8.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/king%20air/KA9.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/king%20air/KA10.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/king%20air/KA11.jpg

Waldo.Pepper
02-12-2007, 07:32 PM
All this is from the a.b.p.a. newsgroup.


First the pilots stories

=====

Deadly day avoided at Cape airport
Saturday, February 3, 2007
By TJ Greaney ~ Southeast Missourian


Sheldon Stone made an emergency landing at Cape Girardeau Regional
Airport early Friday. He and his co-pilot depressurized the plane when the
windshield shattered, but they then lost consciousness. The tail damage
occurred while they were unconscious.
(Kit Doyle)
[Click to enlarge]
The twin-engine plane was diving toward the ground Friday morning at a speed
of well over 400 miles per hour. Its pilot and co-pilot were unconscious
from oxygen deprivation.
The plane's nose was tilted down and in about 15 seconds would collide with
the earth northwest of Cape Girardeau.

Death seemed certain.

But pilot Sheldon Stone and co-pilot Adam Moore are alive today.

"We must have had angels on our shoulders, that's all I can say," said
Stone, who flies the plane for the owner of Summit Bank of Arkansas and has
about 4,200 hours of flying experience.

Shortly after the plane took off from Rogers, Ark., en route to Shenandoah,
Va., the windshield of the cockpit shattered. The pilots, who were the only
people on board, don't know what caused that, but they immediately
depressurized the cabin.

"We were both worried the windshield would blow out. If that happened, we
would be dead immediately," Stone said.

Stone and Moore took the plane off autopilot and reached for the
"heavy-duty" oxygen masks mounted on the plane's ceiling.

Stone twisted a valve to begin the flow of oxygen. The pressurized tank in
the rear should have promptly started because the plane was above 12,500
feet.

But it didn't.

So Stone pulled on straps at the side of the mask, a type of manual override
to force air flow.

Still nothing.

"We were both getting drunk really fast. I remember thinking, really slowly,
'Hey, I'm not getting any oxygen, what's wrong here?' But I was so loony
already at that point I couldn't even solve the problem if it could be
solved," he said. "I just sort of thought to myself, 'I've got to hurry,'
but everything was fading."

For the next 60 seconds everything went black.

Over the course of that time, the plane plummeted from 27,000 feet to 7,000
feet.

Then Stone got a rush of blood to the head. He woke up.

"My first thought, I mean, you're still so loony, I remember thinking, 'Why
is this plane going so fast?'" he said.

Stone grabbed the throttle and pulled the nose skyward.

The craft stopped falling, but a great deal of damage had been done.
Somewhere during the descent, the left portion of the tail, which houses the
elevator and horizontal stabilizer, ripped off. Each wing was warped in an
upside-down V shape due to the G-force exerted on them.

Stone radioed air-traffic control in Memphis and was told the closest
airport was Cape Girardeau. He was exhilarated to be alive, but quickly had
to get serious.

"I thought I was home free, but then I realize how hard it was to get the
plane under control and I started to think, 'Wait a minute. This thing isn't
over yet. I've got to find a way to land.'"

Just keeping the plane horizontal was a struggle. When Stone accelerated,
pressure pushed the nose upward, but when the pilot slowed down the craft,
its nose pitched downward and the pilot had to yank it back.

Eventually, they decided on a speed of 160 knots and began easing the plane
in for a landing.

Within five minutes of the call to Memphis, the plane was visible at Cape
Girardeau Regional Airport. It landed without incident and before the
emergency responders could reach the scene.

"I'd say it was a supremely good landing," said chief controller Larry
Davis. "I see student pilots make worse landings every day."

And when they saw the battered, broken plane, their jaws dropped.

"This is one of the most incredible stories I've ever heard," said airport
manager Bruce Loy.

Today, the plane sits off the landing strip marked off by yellow tape. Its
wings are warped and engine likely fried. It likely won't ever fly again,
said airport officials.

But for those who it carried to safety, the plane means something special.

"That plane has Christian background," Stone said.

The plane's former owner was an Assembly of God Christian association. Its
registration number, N777AG, had biblical significance combining a holy
number and an abbreviation for Assembly of God.

The church kept the number when they sold the plane to Stone's boss but
suggested the new owners might replace it with "AJ" for "Assembly of Jesus."

They did, and Friday the little King Air 200 pulled off a miracle.

"I'm just thanking God. I'm very thankful to be alive today," Stone said.

=====

Now the NTSB's opinion.

=====

NTSB Identification: CHI07LA063
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, February 02, 2007 in Cape Girardeau, MO
Aircraft: Raytheon Aircraft Company B200, registration: N777AJ
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain
errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final
report has been completed.

On February 2, 2007, about 1030 central standard time, a Raytheon
Aircraft Company B200, N777AJ, sustained substantial damage during an
uncontrolled descent and recovery from cruise at flight level 270.
Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident.
The flightcrew reported that they depressurized the airplane after
noticing cracking of the airplane windshield. They then donned their
oxygen masks but were unable to obtain oxygen from the oxygen system
resulting in their loss of consciousness. They later regained
consciousness, recovered from the descent, and landed without further
incident at Cape Girardeau Regional Airport, Cape Girardeau, Missouri.
The 14 CFR Part 91 flight was operating on an instrument rules flight
plan. The pilot and copilot were uninjured. The flight originated from
Rogers Municipal Airport-Carter Field, Rogers, Arkansas, at 0939.

On-scene inspection of the airplane noted that approximately 2/3 of the
left horizontal stabilizer and elevator were separated from the aircraft
and 2/3 of the right elevator was separated but attached at the inboard
hinge. The left and right wings were wrinkled. The left pilot windshield
outer and inner ply were intact. The inner ply exhibited a shattered
appearance with a crack at the lower right hand corner of the
windshield. The cabin pressurization dump switch was in the dump
position.

The oxygen system worked when it was functionally tested in accordance
with Airplane Flight Manual.


=====

Now some pictures.

=====

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/king%20air/KA1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/king%20air/KA3.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/king%20air/KA4.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/king%20air/KA5.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/king%20air/KA6.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/king%20air/KA7.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/king%20air/KA8.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/king%20air/KA9.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/king%20air/KA10.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/king%20air/KA11.jpg

PBNA-Boosher
02-12-2007, 10:16 PM
Wow! Thanks for sharing, that's amazing! It makes me trust my little Piper Cherokee a whole lot more, actually.

p-11.cAce
02-12-2007, 10:29 PM
don't know about the christianist stuff but the crew were certainly lucky http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif Tough call to make - keep the cabin pressure and risk blowing out the windshield or dump it and depend on the o2 system. For anyone interested here is their track log 777aj track (http://flightaware.com/live/flight/N777AJ/history/20070202/1439Z/KROG/KCGI/tracklog) check out time - 10:22 27000' 10:23 7800' http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

rnzoli
02-13-2007, 08:23 AM
They are lucky that they disconnected from the autopilot, otherwise they are dead for sure.

Mr.Kilroy
02-13-2007, 11:14 AM
The windshield doesn't look shattered in the first photo. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

p-11.cAce
02-13-2007, 12:07 PM
King Air windshields (like all pressurized aircraft) are laminated from several layers of glass and plastics. In this case (and many others) one of the glass layers "spider webs" but does not "blow out". The pilots were concerned the pressurization would "blow out" the windshield panel so they slowed and dumped cabin pressure - unfortunatly they dumped the cabin at 27000' without verifying the O2 system was armed and functioning first. Lots of monday morning quarterbacking in a number of piloting formus about this one as King Airs are fairly susceptible to windshield delaminations. Regardless of the propriety of their actions they got the job done (perhaps with a bit more luck than most).

general_kalle
02-13-2007, 12:54 PM
i dont understand how he got it level from the dive when the elevator was gone?

nsteense
02-13-2007, 01:13 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by general_kalle:
i dont understand how he got it level from the dive when the elevator was gone? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

You can use the engine power to control your airplane if you don't have flight controls. High power will get the nose up, power off, the nose will go down.

Taylortony
02-13-2007, 04:58 PM
Pah chicken feed.................. that is a minor problem, imagine flying along having a head on collision with another aircraft that totally rips the roof and top off the plane............ now that's what you call an Emergency.......

http://ships.bouwman.com/Planes/MidAir.html

http://ships.bouwman.com/Planes/baronmidair.jpg

http://www.avweb.com/newspics/baronmidair2.jpg

http://www.avweb.com/newspics/baronmidair3.jpg

sad thing was.............

Sometimes you see the wreckage and wonder how anyone got out alive. If this Beech Baron had been flying a few inches to the right, we likely wouldn't be wondering how Robert Hollis Gates, of Tehachapi, Calif., managed to land the plane safely after a midair with a Cessna 180 last Jan. 16. The Baron lost a section of fuselage, but Gates walked away with cuts and bruises. The 180 broke up in flight and the pilot, 40-year-old David Lazerson, a civilian test pilot instructor at Edwards Air Force Base and deputy director of the Joint Strike Fighter Integrated Test Force, was killed. According to the NTSB report, Gates said he was in cruise climb between 5,500 and 6,500 feet near Tehachapi when he saw the right gear leg of the Cessna coming at him from one o' clock. He ducked, then saw a dirt strip and managed to set the Baron down. AVweb wasn't able to reach Gates.

Taylortony
02-13-2007, 05:05 PM
Or the F15 that tore the wing off and landed, yup u are correct that was the whole wing.............

http://www.uss-bennington.org/phz-nowing-f15.html

p-11.cAce
02-13-2007, 05:37 PM
Woohoo - Beechcraft builds 'em tough http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Waldo.Pepper
02-13-2007, 08:09 PM
A follow up post speculates further on the event.

=====

In over 20 years of working on the model 200 I saw only one cracked windshield was as a result of an improper installation (and it wasn't me so
don't go there). More often than not, it was turning on the W/S anti-ice on later in climbout or at cruise that the pane cracked due to cold soak and the resulting thermal shock. I think our heroic crew may share some culpability on this miracle of survival. I don't know about the new one's coming out but you have to arm the oxygen system to make it available for use on the King Air. It's on the prestart checklist.
Change 0c. to 5.
Change 5. to 5a.

=====

So who knows.

re the Christian comments, they are not mine. I posted the words as I found them.

M2morris
02-15-2007, 06:43 AM
For those interested click feb 07. OT,I've been trying to find the report of my cousin's fatal crash in a Grumman yankee in 1974 or 75, but unable, and my brother had engine failer in his RV4 in march 2000 and landed ok, but its not here either well anyway this is a very interesting post. Amazing. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif
http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/Month.asp

-HH- Beebop
02-15-2007, 07:06 AM
Very interesting Waldo. Thanks for sharing. Do you think Oleg based the FM of the La series on this? Anytime I dive in one.....
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Taylortony:
Or the F15 that tore the wing off and landed, yup u are correct that was the whole wing.............

http://www.uss-bennington.org/phz-nowing-f15.html </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
And and interesting bit from that story..."It is said that the student was later demoted for disobeying his instructor, then promoted for saving the aircraft."

mrsiCkstar
02-15-2007, 07:29 AM
there's a vide of that Eagle incident on youtube somewhere.

Waldo.Pepper
02-15-2007, 03:51 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by mrsiCkstar:
there's a vide of that Eagle incident on youtube somewhere. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Here, but it is a recreation by the History channel. The footage is not genuine.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e1aKxAN7bAs

-HH- Beebop
02-15-2007, 07:06 PM
Breaking News! History Channel uses Photoshop! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif
Oh yeah, that "A4" looked suspiciously like an F-100 Super Sabre.

Still a good story.

dharma1_505
09-06-2007, 12:08 AM
These pilots turned a non-emergency into a major emergency. Cracked winshields are COMMON on King Airs -- the cabins do NOT depressurize. The checklist says to descend below 25,000 feet and set the pressurization controller to 2.0 - 4.6 psi -- that is IT.

The pilots opted to DUMP the cabin which depressurized the cabin THEN they donned oxygen masks (this is out of order -- you put the masks on first) -- they obviously did not ARM the oxygen system prior to take-off. If they had, the masks would have provided oxygen right away.

I have met numerous King Air pilots who have had cracked windshields -- all were NON EVENTs -- they just flew the plane home. These two did everything wrong and are lucky to be alive.

SwellyStone
01-29-2018, 07:13 PM
Thats because the windshield didn't shatter it scracked and broke up.