PDA

View Full Version : Did the Germans ever chain their bombs together ? - battle of britain era



Ed_the_sock
04-03-2005, 02:11 AM
A family friend (now deceased) lived in Southern England as a young teenager during WW2, close to Biggin Hill. He talked of what he saw, contrails, parachutes, etc, but also said that as you watched the bombs fall you could see the chains they used to make the bombs fall in a tight circle.

I have never read anything about this since. I'm just curious whether its true, or whether he misinterpreted something. Or made it up http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

ploughman
04-03-2005, 06:44 AM
I did hear about a BoB RAF fighter pilot who saw a German bomber throw out something like two grenades connected by a long chain. He thought the idea was the chain would catch on an attacking fighter and the grenades would them bang against the aircraft and detonate.

Liquid-Koshed
04-03-2005, 07:54 AM
It may be possible he saw these? i could see how they would be mistaken for 2 bombs chained together.Butterfly bomb

http://www.simadventures.com/butterfly.jpg

from here http://www.warbirdsresourcegroup.org/LRG/bombs.html

http://www.simadventures.com/lightningstrike.jpg

Engrs
04-03-2005, 08:18 AM
Butterfly bombs were only dropped on the UK once. This was during a night raid on the town of Beverley near Hull in the NE of England in 1941.

Many curious children were killed picking up unexploded examples the next morning. It is thought this news reached Germany, and is believed to be one of the reason they were never dropped on the UK again.

Liquid-Koshed
04-03-2005, 08:22 AM
right... i wondered if a when they were used its the first reference to them ive seen.

LStarosta
04-03-2005, 12:51 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Engrs:
Butterfly bombs were only dropped on the UK once. This was during a night raid on the town of Beverley near Hull in the NE of England in 1941.

Many curious children were killed picking up unexploded examples the next morning. It is thought this news reached Germany, and is believed to be one of the reason they were never dropped on the UK again. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

How fortunate that the Germans in WWII had such a great sense of respect for humanity...

Hristos
04-03-2005, 12:56 PM
Some did, some didn't. It is not just black and white. On all sides.

Grue_
04-03-2005, 01:07 PM
Back to the chains....

I'd love to hear the comments of the crew if one of the bombs got stuck in the plane and the rest sort of dangling below http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif

It doesn't sound like a good idea tbh.

hop2002
04-03-2005, 01:31 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Butterfly bombs were only dropped on the UK once. This was during a night raid on the town of Beverley near Hull in the NE of England in 1941.

Many curious children were killed picking up unexploded examples the next morning. It is thought this news reached Germany, and is believed to be one of the reason they were never dropped on the UK again. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

"Butterfly" bombs were dropped quite frequently during the BoB and Blitz, and were still being dropped on Britain as late as 1944 (and killed their final victim in 1956, when a bomb disposal engineer was killed trying to remove one)

DarkCanuck420
04-03-2005, 01:50 PM
whats the point of butterfly bombs? what makes them different from the common bomb? what purpose do the signs serve?

Liquid-Koshed
04-03-2005, 02:44 PM
Imagine an airfield strewn with these baby€s and you€re the poor sod that€s got to clear them!?
I had a lecture from a bomb disposal expert once I couldn€t understand how somebody would actually volunteer to do the job €¦ a strange breed.

http://www.simadventures.com/lightningstrike.jpg

ploughman
04-03-2005, 04:20 PM
Butterly bombs were the precursor to the cluster bomb. The German designer who created them went to the US after the war and was invovled in creating cluster bombs there.

Against airfields the purpose of these weapons is to render them unusable for a long period as you have to clear them out of the way without getting your ground crew killed, and then you have to be sure you've gotten them all before you roll your expensive fighters over them. Interestingly, cluster munitions with time delay or touch sensitive fuzes are now banned in many countries as they breach the Anti-Mine Convention. For example, the JP233 airfield denial weapon, which liberally sprinkled an airfield with a variety of nasty sub-munitions many of which were specifically designed to kill or injure enemy personnel was withdrawn from British service after it signed up to this convention. Additionally, UK forces only now use manually triggered rather than trip wire triggered claymores as the later is construed as being a mine. However, his only applies to anti-personnel devices. If you're in a tank you'd better be carefull where you drive.

Beaufort-RAF
04-03-2005, 06:29 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Engrs:
Butterfly bombs were only dropped on the UK once. This was during a night raid on the town of Beverley near Hull in the NE of England in 1941.

Many curious children were killed picking up unexploded examples the next morning. It is thought this news reached Germany, and is believed to be one of the reason they were never dropped on the UK again. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Don't know where you read that but it's completely wrong.

There was a raid on Grimsby in the summer of '43 when thousands of butterfly bombs were dropped.

They created hundreds of civillian casualties but a news blackout was enforced to stop the Germans learning of the disruption caused.

Abbuzze
04-04-2005, 01:59 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Ploughman:
Butterly bombs were the precursor to the cluster bomb. The German designer who created them went to the US after the war and was invovled in creating cluster bombs there.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Clusterbombs were allready in use in the WW2 take a look at the SD250 / SD500 bombs (FW190 for example) they carried a number of small fragmentation bombs inside. But yes maybe the designers went into the USA after the war to get them even "better".

JG53Frankyboy
04-04-2005, 02:53 AM
=AB250/500 http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

avimimus
04-04-2005, 07:56 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by LStarosta:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Engrs:
Butterfly bombs were only dropped on the UK once. This was during a night raid on the town of Beverley near Hull in the NE of England in 1941.

Many curious children were killed picking up unexploded examples the next morning. It is thought this news reached Germany, and is believed to be one of the reason they were never dropped on the UK again. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

How fortunate that the Germans in WWII had such a great sense of respect for humanity... <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

It just shows that the "press" or its eqivalent is the almsot same anywhere, anytime.

People are fine with torching entire cities, but as soon as they image A individual child being blown up they get queezy.

Unless the child is a Slav in this case.

Back to chains:
Such bombs could well have been used for attack unusual targets like radar masts.

avimimus
04-04-2005, 07:59 AM
Not to get political but if German sub-munitions weere so dangerous and had such bad effects, imagine what the "black rain" over Iraq must leave behind. My point is only that an F-15E carrying twelve to twenty Rockeyes or CBU-87s is going to do a lot more than a He-111 ever could.

With better weapons comes even more cost and risk to war and more responsibility.

Engrs
04-04-2005, 08:58 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Beaufort-RAF:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Engrs

Butterfly bombs were only dropped on the UK once. This was during a night raid on the town of Beverley near Hull in the NE of England in 1941.

Many curious children were killed picking up unexploded examples the next morning. It is thought this news reached Germany, and is believed to be one of the reason they were never dropped on the UK again. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Don't know where you read that but it's completely wrong.

There was a raid on Grimsby in the summer of '43 when thousands of butterfly bombs were dropped.

They created hundreds of civillian casualties but a news blackout was enforced to stop the Germans learning of the disruption caused. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

You are correct mate sorry.

My apologise gentlemen for this bogus info. That's what comes from trusting the BBC.

I feel very, very embarrassed because I served four years working Airfield Damage/Repair as a Sapper responsible for the airfields of RAF Germany. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

ploughman
04-04-2005, 09:17 AM
Semantics dude, what we now now as the cluster bomb began life as those butterfly bombs. They called them butterfly bombs at the time and we call them cluster bombs today, sorry if you thought I thought there was a difference.