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hdjuey
03-07-2007, 04:20 PM
yeager the autobiography. man I just thought he was the first to break the SB, but his WWII days was interesting is there any other pilot auto that a good read

hdjuey
03-07-2007, 04:20 PM
yeager the autobiography. man I just thought he was the first to break the SB, but his WWII days was interesting is there any other pilot auto that a good read

Tully__
03-07-2007, 09:47 PM
Most war time bios are a good read, even the blatantly hero worshipping ones such as the Douglas Bader bio "Reach for the Sky" by Paul Brickhill.

x6BL_Brando
03-08-2007, 03:30 PM
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D0CEEDE...35A15757C0A967958260 (http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D0CEEDE1531F935A15757C0A9679582 60)

What else are heroes for? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
PB's books were rather "Boys' Own", it's true - but it's also clear that DB's pilots were all in awe and admiration of the man and his achievements. I think Brickhill's book is redolent of that view - the slightly older 'man' as viewed by the 'boys' that were in his charge. He really was worshipped in that way and the author is just reflecting that in his work.

I never met PB but I was lucky enough to meet Sir Douglas Bader as he was by then, at several fund-raising parties organised by my late father-in-law, himself a wartime Wing-Commander. I was struck by his energetic support for all disabled people and his passion for getting things done. Bureaucracy drove him crazy and he worked tirelessly to overcome it; it became his raison d'etre and it ultimately killed him, but it was his choice to carry on. It's not hard to see why the fellows of 242 Squadron were so cut up when he was brought down over France.

All of this was years before I lost my own arm and learnt firsthand how Godawful it is to live with the awkwardness & the constant pain that the majority of amputees put up with. Having a live hero like DB coming to visit them in hospital (as he did constantly, up to his death) inspired countless amputees to carry on fighting a fate that most of us can't imagine.

He was more than just a war hero - and Brickhill's "blatant hero worship" wasn't all that misplaced.

I'm just saying....

B

Tully__
03-09-2007, 12:06 AM
I'm not arguing http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

flyin_scotzzman
03-09-2007, 12:56 AM
Hi,
look for "The Big Show" by Pierre Closterman, an outstanding read. It follows his exploits in the Spitfire and Tempest.
It's not strictly an autobiography but a detailed account of his operational war diaries.

His description of intense flak and it's effects is very vivid.
You won't go wrong with this one.

dugong
03-09-2007, 05:32 PM
I loved that book. I liked the part where he put pebbles in the hubcaps of the CO's car. Every time he would drive the car it would make a hell of a racket. He said it drove the CO nuts - he thought it was something mechanical as it only happened when the car was in motion and it would stop when the car did! Pretty funny.

And they went deer hunting in their P51's over Sweden or Finland or somewhere like that. I guess you can take the man out of the country but no the country out of the man!

The scuttlebutt was is that he was overlooked for the space program because he was a country bumpkin without a highbrow degree. Too bad, he could apparently make uncanny deflection shots and he had the eyesight of an eagle. Apparently he could tell what make of planes were of in the distance before anyone else would even see them. It was rumored he could out just about out fly anyone too.

Chuck is the man!