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IDF_Raam
03-30-2005, 09:00 AM
I red a book about the british ww2 ace w/c R.S. Tuck.
It was mentioned in several places that before shooting, <span class="ev_code_RED">he always checked the artificial horizon.</span>I don't have the book now and can not check, but my impressin was that he made sure he was level.
Does it make sense? Surely shooting is done when banking as well?

The book is "FLY FOR YOUR LIFR" by Larry Forrester (501-199-71)

IDF_Raam
03-30-2005, 09:00 AM
I red a book about the british ww2 ace w/c R.S. Tuck.
It was mentioned in several places that before shooting, <span class="ev_code_RED">he always checked the artificial horizon.</span>I don't have the book now and can not check, but my impressin was that he made sure he was level.
Does it make sense? Surely shooting is done when banking as well?

The book is "FLY FOR YOUR LIFR" by Larry Forrester (501-199-71)

Covino
03-30-2005, 09:23 AM
Well, firing your weapons is a focus intensive act, even more so than reminding yourself not to stare at a womans cleavage. A common mistake even aces make is to become so focused on shooting down your prey, you let your situational awareness go, well, kaput. Situational awareness includes awareness of enemy planes and other larger objects such as, for example, the Earth. Maybe checking his AI before firing, helped him gain his bearings before entering that trance-like state (my favorite targets online). Or maybe he could better estimate bullet trajectory if he knew the attitude of the plane.

dieg777
03-30-2005, 09:41 AM
It would make more sense if he checked his turn and slip indicator to make sure he wasnt slipping or skidding which would effect his aim

see here for more details

http://www.simhq.com/_air/air_001a.html

but havnt read the book in a while so couldnt be sure

Jungmann
03-30-2005, 10:26 AM
Second the above post. Your memory's probably a little off. He was surely checking his ball.

Cheers,

jocko417
03-30-2005, 10:45 AM
He was checking the Turn and Slip indicator, not the Art. Horiz.

Waldo.Pepper
03-30-2005, 01:25 PM
He might have been checking his level to ease any ammunition feeding problems.

Lets find the quote to be sure.

LStarosta
03-30-2005, 01:32 PM
I check my balls to make sure I'm a straight shooter...

IDF_Raam
03-30-2005, 02:00 PM
Thanks for your answers.
I guess it was the Turn and Slip indicator, and since the book was translated to hebrew the interperter probably mis-translated the technical term

F19_Ob
03-30-2005, 03:10 PM
I also think it might be the turn/slip indicator they mean unless its very high and there is no reference of the horison.
Ofcourse U adjust automatically when u have the horison as reference but when U go up and lose sight of the horison its good to know if u are going straight. Many ww2 planes required lots of rudder in turns depending on speed.

The gauges I watch carefully in combat is the speedgauge and hight. I use verticalfighting whenever I can and its important to know if I have speed enough for a certain maneuver.
I hardly ever have to watch the slipindicator though.
The next gauge in line is the temperature gauges.
If u overheat and dont know about it U soon have a ruined engine.