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BSS_Goat
09-07-2005, 05:02 AM
Article from Oct 2004

http://www3.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/0410/feature5/

terrible that no one payed attention....

tHeBaLrOgRoCkS
09-07-2005, 05:12 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif errrr FIRE IN THE HOLE!!!

Low_Flyer_MkII
09-07-2005, 05:20 AM
Tully's not going to like the size of that piccie in your sig...........

BSS_Goat
09-07-2005, 05:24 AM
LOL, Yeah I took it down.

woofiedog
09-07-2005, 06:22 AM
BSS_Goat... Excellent article

Popey109
09-07-2005, 07:29 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

Lucius_Esox
09-07-2005, 07:38 AM
That is earily right.. Makes you wonder what else people are right about!!

I'm not prone to catastrophise but lets just say the climatologists are right, what are they predicting?, and who is causing it, us..

Don't you just love the greed part of mans nature........

Bearcat99
09-07-2005, 07:45 AM
Wow.................. which justifies the outrage many feel even more......

VFS-214_Hawk
09-07-2005, 08:05 AM
Governments and people never learn. Its all about money and greed....and yes, I am an American. Stupidity is America's past time http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

reverendkrv1972
09-07-2005, 08:14 AM
Governments and people never learn. Its all about money and greed....

word,nothing gets addressed until it's happened & a lot of people lose so much.
so much gets brushed under the carpet,and 'they' think the general public can't see it.

Pirschjaeger
09-07-2005, 08:22 AM
I wonder what the future will bring. What happened was predicted as I pointed out before. This was no surprise to the experts. The difference is that now it is not just the government and the scientists that know, but everyone now knows.

Because we live such a short time, maybe 100 years, we don't see the climate cycles. Global warming is part of a natural cycle that has been going on for milleniums, it's nothing new, accept to us, the here and now living. Global warming is happening right now and our pollution doesn't have as much effect as nature does.

I really can't imagine what they will do 6 months from now. Will they rebuild in the same locations? There will be other hurricanes and possibly even greater. How will they be able to protect these areas next time? It's not so hard to protect the people. Especially after this hard lesson, less people will suffer next time and proper actions will be taken.

It will be a very hard go for the people in these areas to put their lives back together. I just hope they find ways to protect their homes and neighborhoods next time. I can't imagine how though. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif

Fritz

FlatSpinMan
09-07-2005, 08:26 AM
That's uncanny. thanks for posting.

georgeo76
09-07-2005, 08:52 AM
There is money destroying the environment, there is money in reconstruction, but prevention is a charity.

We just don't do things well that are not profitable. If you don't believe me just look at the difference in security between a casino and an airport.

p1ngu666
09-07-2005, 08:55 AM
aww, cheer up bush is heading the investigation http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif

and, yes with george, he is right

p1ngu666
09-07-2005, 08:56 AM
george76, that is http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Bearcat99
09-07-2005, 09:01 AM
Like a great griot once said.. "When it comes to peoples safety... money wins out everytime.... (and we almost lost Detroit... that time..... that time.... how will we ever get over.... loosing our minds....)"

BSS_Goat
09-07-2005, 09:04 AM
Originally posted by Bearcat99:
"griot"

Hey I learned a new word today.... thanks Bearcat.

gree-ooh a West African story teller.

Pirschjaeger
09-07-2005, 09:08 AM
I hear Halliburton is hiring. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Fritz

Pirschjaeger
09-07-2005, 09:20 AM
BTW, if what I was told was accurate, then Bush doesn't deserve any of the blame.

I have a friend in the US who shall remain nameless since he's a politician. Lastnight we spoke about the recent events and he explained the way things work in the US.

He told me that there are steps that must be taken before the President can actually step in. According to what my friend said, firstly, the local government is responsible to call in the national guard. The national guard goes in first before the military.

The local leaders failed big time, as you can read what happened in the American news. It also becomes more clear in the article Goat posted a link to. If I understood correctly, the line was bad, the local leader is to send in the national guard to assess the situation. Based on the reports he is then responsible to contact the White House and request assistance.

Can any Americans confirm this?

If this is correct, then it's clear to see how the media is being used politically.

Fritz

georgeo76
09-07-2005, 09:44 AM
Isn't it a cop-out to blame the politicians anyway? I mean we have a representative government and it works better than is comfortable to admit. We send these people to city hall and Washington and they take care of what we VALUE.

So next time you hear the cynic describe the politician, remember. They are our representatives, they are the best among us, they are us.

Pirschjaeger
09-07-2005, 09:52 AM
Forget the politics, this is what you can expect from Americans.

WASHINGTON (AFP) - Moved by the devastation and despair wrought by Hurricane Katrina, Americans across the United States are opening their homes, trailers and vacation getaways to offer shelter to the hundreds of thousands left homeless by the storm.

"Everyone deserves a safe place to rest their head, they shouldn't have to live the way they are," said Beth Blanch, 34, who stepped forward in a message posted on the Internet to take in victims at her home in Fairfax, Virginia.

"To see the devastation that is all throughout Louisiana and Mississippi and to see people who are down there and have lost everything, it is impossible to stand by and not try to do something for them," added Blanch, who has four children.

She said she had been contacted by the Red Cross and expected a couple hurricane survivors to arrive at her house in coming days with their two cats.

"We have a fully finished basement that we can turn into a mini apartment for them," she said. "They will have shelter, food and we'll help whoever comes here find a job and schooling if they have kids."

Playing a key role in dealing with the monumental problem of matching volunteers and survivors is the Internet with some 15 websites springing up in the aftermath of the hurricane.

One of the largest websites is katrinahousing.org, set up by several young computer programmers based in Utah.

"We're getting a million hits a day on our site," Paul Wilson, one of the founders of the site, told AFP.

He said the website has been deluged with offers since it was set up on Thursday with nearly 60,000 people across the United States offering shelter as of midday on Tuesday and some 2,600 survivors placed.

"Our programmers are working day and night," he said. "This is our way of helping."

Among those who have offered shelter to hurricane survivors is Jessica Ponce Denicola, 20, who provided a spare room in her two-bedroom apartment in Baton Rouge, Louisiana to a homeless couple from New Orleans.

She said she and her husband were moved to act after seeing some of the horrific images on television and working at a shelter for survivors.

"When you hear some of the stories, you cannot but help," she said. "It was something I needed to do.

"My offer to these people is open-ended and they can stay as long as they need."

A California woman identified only as Mrs B. said in a web message: "I am willing to house a family of four or smaller. If I can help please let me know, I don't have much but a safe, warm dry place to lay your heads."

Some 50 empty residential care group homes earmarked for needy children in Georgia have also flung their doors open to hurricane survivors.

"We are mainly trying to help people who have nothing and nowhere else to go," said Veverly Ricks, who owns one of those homes. "This is a disaster. We have the space and it is needed."

Just a positive note. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Fritz

SeaFireLIV
09-07-2005, 10:09 AM
Britain`s quite bad about not acting to prevent the worse. Even with warnings. I hope we will take stock of what`s happened in New Orleans. In fact, the whole developed world needs to stop being so inward looking and pay attention to the greater whole. One small example: The mass use of residential cars and their emissions...

We all know it`s having an effect on our environment. An effect that`s becoming more noticable year by year.

Still, if everyone continues ignoring their effect on the world`s environment it doesn`t matter... NATURE will make us all wake up soon enough... even to the point of changing our use of every day travel.

Pirschjaeger
09-07-2005, 10:41 AM
What you just posted Seafire is also part of what is causing unbalanced distribution of wealth to become more unbalanced. The fat shepard gets fatter while the hungry sheep grow hungrier. Sometimes I feel we are going back to feudalism on a much grander scale. Just like feudalism in the past, there is a beginning, a climax, and an end. Seems like another cycle of nature and we are only in the beginning.

Fritz

anarchy52
09-07-2005, 10:44 AM
So next time you hear the cynic describe the politician, remember. They are our representatives, they are the best among us, they are us.

You are joking, right?

Pirschjaeger
09-07-2005, 10:50 AM
Originally posted by anarchy52:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">
So next time you hear the cynic describe the politician, remember. They are our representatives, they are the best among us, they are us.

You are joking, right? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Georgeo's post, your reply, your name. How poetic. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Fritz

georgeo76
09-07-2005, 11:08 AM
LOL, when I say politician are the best among us, I mean in a cultural achievement way. They are CEOs, Lawyers, Bankers, and Doctors, you know, successful? In other words, they played the America game, and won.

georgeo76
09-07-2005, 12:23 PM
This is a whole other thread, and not one that belongs here.

Check your PMs http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif


Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
BTW, if what I was told was accurate, then Bush doesn't deserve any of the blame.

I have a friend in the US who shall remain nameless since he's a politician. Lastnight we spoke about the recent events and he explained the way things work in the US.

He told me that there are steps that must be taken before the President can actually step in. According to what my friend said, firstly, the local government is responsible to call in the national guard. The national guard goes in first before the military.

The local leaders failed big time, as you can read what happened in the American news. It also becomes more clear in the article Goat posted a link to. If I understood correctly, the line was bad, the local leader is to send in the national guard to assess the situation. Based on the reports he is then responsible to contact the White House and request assistance.

Can any Americans confirm this?

If this is correct, then it's clear to see how the media is being used politically.

Fritz

Taylortony
09-07-2005, 12:26 PM
I know the Uk is sending 500,000 Rat Packs http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif As an ex military Person who has survived on these I know they are very good, they Bung you up like a cork in a bottle mind you http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif, but are really well put together, And they have a good supply of sweets in them as they are high in energy, I do wonder what the Americans eating these will think of our Yorkie Bars http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Whilst not the worlds best Chocolate, it is miles ahead of Hershey Bars and very addictive http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Its good to feel that we are giving back some help to a Country that has always stepped in to help us when we were in desperate needs... Enjoy your Yorkie bars, and I hope all that I know and those that I dont are well and coping http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

huggy87
09-07-2005, 06:36 PM
Originally posted by Taylortony:
I know the Uk is sending 500,000 Rat Packs http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif As an ex military Person who has survived on these I know they are very good, they Bung you up like a cork in a bottle mind you http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif, but are really well put together, And they have a good supply of sweets in them as they are high in energy, I do wonder what the Americans eating these will think of our Yorkie Bars http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Whilst not the worlds best Chocolate, it is miles ahead of Hershey Bars and very addictive http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Its good to feel that we are giving back some help to a Country that has always stepped in to help us when we were in desperate needs... Enjoy your Yorkie bars, and I hope all that I know and those that I dont are well and coping http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

I just hope they don't have any blood pudding or oxtail soup or any of the other atrocities I heard came with British WW2 rations. I'm sure the American MRE's will be popular, or at least the tobacco sauce will. Being New Orleans.

WarWolfe_1
09-07-2005, 07:30 PM
Terrible that this has happened. This has brought out the Best in Americans though. The amout of giving not just from outside the states, but inside as well. People Donating money, time, you name it and it has been given. I just read a article in the USAToday that told of a dsiplaced couple in Houston that a gentelmen walkup to them in a store and hand them his only $10that he was going to use for some clothes for his kids, and said he was sorry that he couldn't give more.

To all those that have given your time, your money, you own belongings. Thanks you.

Pirschjaeger
09-07-2005, 07:31 PM
Originally posted by huggy87:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Taylortony:
I know the Uk is sending 500,000 Rat Packs http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif As an ex military Person who has survived on these I know they are very good, they Bung you up like a cork in a bottle mind you http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif, but are really well put together, And they have a good supply of sweets in them as they are high in energy, I do wonder what the Americans eating these will think of our Yorkie Bars http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Whilst not the worlds best Chocolate, it is miles ahead of Hershey Bars and very addictive http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Its good to feel that we are giving back some help to a Country that has always stepped in to help us when we were in desperate needs... Enjoy your Yorkie bars, and I hope all that I know and those that I dont are well and coping http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

I just hope they don't have any blood pudding or oxtail soup or any of the other atrocities I heard came with British WW2 rations. I'm sure the American MRE's will be popular, or at least the tobacco sauce will. Being New Orleans. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

The ones with Caribbean roots will love the ox tail soup. I knew a lot of people in Toronto from the islands and ox tail is a delicacy to them. Throw in some "rice and peas", rice cooked will coconut milk and kidney beans, and they'll have their favorite meal.

Fritz

FI-Aflak
09-07-2005, 10:31 PM
They've known that a class 3 or better hurricane would destroy new orleans forever. The city's government had their heads so far up their collective rear that they failed to put an evacuation plan into motion, a plan that had been developed and tested and would have certainly worked better than what did happen. Bush had to personally order the evacuation, and I guess his interference irked the mayor because he didn't use the city and school buses that the plan called for, leaving 3-400 servicible buses to be flooded and destroyed.

Everything I've heard about the mayor from friends that lived in the area indicates that he is a joke, but was better than the last guy.

At any rate, they'll rebuild New Orleans because it is such an important port, maybe the suburbanites will move back, but the city as we know it is dead. Probably won't see Mardi Gras there anymore, bourbon street will not come back, and if it does it will be a mere corporate shadow of what it had been.

I'm in houston, there are currently 240,000 refugees in texas, many of them are just down the street from my school at the Reliant stadium/astrodome. My friends and I have gone down a couple times to help out, it seems most of the city has, too. Texas can't support 240,000 more unemployed persons, though (states pick up most of that, not the federal government) so the refugees will have to be more evenly distributed -- first time I've seen armed guards at campus entrances was immediatly after refugees started showing up and the rioting in New Orleans was still in full swing. Its a mess, it could have been allieviated somewhat by a better and less beaurocratic response, but it couldn't have been stopped.

Bearcat99
09-07-2005, 10:39 PM
While it is true that the local governments.. state included... failed miserably.. the fact that so many National Gaurd troops were in Iraq rests solely on President Bush. Dont get me wrong... truth be told I voted for the man... IMO the choices were obvious.. but as far as this war goes and using National Gaurd troops to wage it.. it was a mistake... a costly one at that. But back to the topic.... yes the local government was responsible. Thats like holding the police responsible for locking your door at night..... (blaming the federal government..) But if you do get robbed and beaten and you dial 911.... and they show up days later... well....

The bottom line is that the state and local governments.. and actually I place more of the blame on the state.... city governments are limited in what they can do..... for the way the whole mess was handled. Thye should have made allownaces to get those people out of there... or reinforce those aging levees.. but they didnt want to spend the money... I bet they gave a lot of tax breaks to the oil companies who run those refineries though.....

Pirschjaeger
09-07-2005, 10:48 PM
I guess now is a good time to post these.

Correction to This Article
A Sept. 4 article on the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina incorrectly said that Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco (D) had not declared a state of emergency. She declared an emergency on Aug. 26.
Many Evacuated, but Thousands Still Waiting
White House Shifts Blame to State and Local Officials

By Manuel Roig-Franzia and Spencer Hsu
Washington Post Staff Writers
Sunday, September 4, 2005; Page A01

NEW ORLEANS, Sept. 3 -- Tens of thousands of people spent a fifth day awaiting evacuation from this ruined city, as Bush administration officials blamed state and local authorities for what leaders at all levels have called a failure of the country's emergency management.

President Bush authorized the dispatch of 7,200 active-duty ground troops to the area -- the first major commitment of regular ground forces in the crisis -- and the Pentagon announced that an additional 10,000 National Guard troops will be sent to Louisiana and Mississippi, raising the total Guard contingent to about 40,000.

Evacuees shield their eyes as a Black Hawk helicopter lands on an Interstate 10 overpass in New Orleans. Many city residents sought refuge on freeways as floodwaters rose around them. (By Shannon Stapleton -- Reuters)

Authorities reported progress in restoring order and electricity and repairing levees, as a hospital ship arrived and cruise ships were sent to provide temporary housing for victims. As Louisiana officials expressed confidence that they had begun to get a handle on the crisis, a dozen National Guard troops broke into applause late Saturday as Isaac Kelly, 81, the last person to be evacuated from the Superdome, boarded a school bus.

But there remained an overwhelming display of human misery on the streets of New Orleans, where the last 1,500 people were being evacuated from the Convention Center amid an overpowering odor of human waste and rotting garbage. The evacuees, most of them black and poor, spoke of violence, anarchy and family members who died for lack of food, water and medical care.

About 42,000 people had been evacuated from the city by Saturday afternoon, with roughly the same number remaining, city officials said. Search-and-rescue efforts continued in flooded areas of the city, where an unknown number of people wait in their homes, on rooftops or in makeshift shelters. Hundreds of thousands of people have been displaced by the flooding -- 250,000 have been absorbed by Texas alone, and local radio reported that Baton Rouge will have doubled in population by Monday. Federal officials said they have begun to collect corpses but could not guess the total toll.

Behind the scenes, a power struggle emerged, as federal officials tried to wrest authority from Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco (D). Shortly before midnight Friday, the Bush administration sent her a proposed legal memorandum asking her to request a federal takeover of the evacuation of New Orleans, a source within the state's emergency operations center said Saturday.

The administration sought unified control over all local police and state National Guard units reporting to the governor. Louisiana officials rejected the request after talks throughout the night, concerned that such a move would be comparable to a federal declaration of martial law. Some officials in the state suspected a political motive behind the request. "Quite frankly, if they'd been able to pull off taking it away from the locals, they then could have blamed everything on the locals," said the source, who does not have the authority to speak publicly.

A senior administration official said that Bush has clear legal authority to federalize National Guard units to quell civil disturbances under the Insurrection Act and will continue to try to unify the chains of command that are split among the president, the Louisiana governor and the New Orleans mayor.

Louisiana did not reach out to a multi-state mutual aid compact for assistance until Wednesday, three state and federal officials said. As of Saturday, Blanco still had not declared a state of emergency, the senior Bush official said.

"The federal government stands ready to work with state and local officials to secure New Orleans and the state of Louisiana," White House spokesman Dan Bartlett said. "The president will not let any form of bureaucracy get in the way of protecting the citizens of Louisiana."

Blanco made two moves Saturday that protected her independence from the federal government: She created a philanthropic fund for the state's victims and hired James Lee Witt, Federal Emergency Management Agency director in the Clinton administration, to advise her on the relief effort.

Bush, who has been criticized, even by supporters, for the delayed response to the disaster, used his weekly radio address to put responsibility for the failure on lower levels of government. The magnitude of the crisis "has created tremendous problems that have strained state and local capabilities," he said. "The result is that many of our citizens simply are not getting the help they need, especially in New Orleans. And that is unacceptable."


And then this one.

Press Release
Date: 8/26/2005

GOVERNOR BLANCO DECLARES STATE OF EMERGENCY

BATON ROUGE, LA--Governor Kathleen Babineaux Blanco today issued Proclamation No. 48 KBB 2005, declaring a state of emergency for the state Louisiana as Hurricane Katrina poses an imminent threat, carrying severe storms, high winds, and torrential rain that may cause flooding and damage to private property and public facilities, and threaten the safety and security of the citizens of the state of Louisiana The state of emergency extends from Friday, August 26, 2005, through Sunday, September 25, 2005, unless terminated sooner.

The full text of Proclamation No. 48 KBB 2005 is as follows:

WHEREAS, the Louisiana Homeland Security and Emergency Assistance and Disaster Act, R.S. 29:721, et seq., confers upon the governor of the state of Louisiana emergency powers to deal with emergencies and disasters, including those caused by fire, flood, earthquake or other natural or man-made causes, in order to ensure that preparations of this state will be adequate to deal with such emergencies or disasters and to preserve the lives and property of the citizens of the state of Louisiana;

WHEREAS, when the governor finds a disaster or emergency has occurred, or the threat thereof is imminent, R.S. 29:724(B)(1) empowers her to declare the state of disaster or emergency by executive order or proclamation, or both; and

WHEREAS, On August 26, 2005, Hurricane Katrina poses an imminent threat to the state of Louisiana, carrying severe storms, high winds, and torrential rain that may cause flooding and damage to private property and public facilities, and threaten the safety and security of the citizens of Louisiana;

NOW THEREFORE I, KATHLEEN BABINEAUX BLANCO,
Governor of the state of Louisiana, by virtue of the authority vested by the Constitution and laws of the state of Louisiana, do hereby order and direct as follows:

SECTION 1: Pursuant to the Louisiana Homeland Security and Emergency Assistance and Disaster Act, R.S. 29:721, et seq., a state of emergency is declared to exist in the state of Louisiana as Hurricane Katrina poses an imminent threat, carrying severe storms, high winds, and torrential rain that may cause flooding and damage to private property and public facilities, and threaten the safety and security of the citizens of the state of Louisiana;

SECTION 2: The state of Louisiana's emergency response and recovery program is activated under the command of the director of the state office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness to prepare for and provide emergency support services and/or to minimize the effects of the storm's damage.

SECTION 3: The state of emergency extends from Friday, August 26, 2005, through Sunday, September 25, 2005, unless terminated sooner.


It seems to me there is a bit of a power struggle to save face.

Fritz

DxyFlyr
09-07-2005, 11:48 PM
I'm in Jackson, Miss. Our damage was minimal compared to a few miles south of here, but we were without power for five days. Some neighborhoods still don't have power. We've got some houses chopped up by fallen trees, but mine was spared any real damage. I had my yard cleaned up by the next day.

Here's a tip for you... For a warm bath, you can connect all your garden hoses and lay them in the sun. That water heats surprisingly quickly. Pour it in a bucket and carry it to the bath.

About New Orleans... It can't die. It just won't happen. After some time drying out and bleaching in the sun, the really rancid areas will be bulldozed and burned. Much of what you remember from visiting the city will remain. The Quarter (as you've seen on TV) was virtually untouched by Katrina. Chances are, you've never been in the areas that will be wiped clean. Everything else will be disinfected and refurbished. Some Urban realignment will take place (I mean the infrastructure), but I bet not as much as you would imagine. I also predict that all this will happen shockingly fast. Much more quickly than the media is postulating. And we'll all be spending a boatload of tax money on a new and improved levee system with failsafes.

Agreed on the culpability of the Mayor and Guv'na. They were asleep at the wheel. No doubt they need to be beaten with a stick. But I do feel FEMA is at least partly to blame as well. If you look at the Govt. response here in Miss. and compare it to that in Lou. it is just mind boggling. I heard our Governor on my little wind-up Grundig very plainly explain what was happening and what would happen every single day during our blackout. I saw the trucks and 'copters swarm in. There was clear and evident leadership here. Not so across the state line. My heart goes out to those folks. My brother's hospital in Alexandria, La is hosting some dislocated Doctors from Charity in N.O. They told him they were dumping bodies out of the hospital windows to keep the clinical areas useable. They took gunfire through those same windows.

On a brighter note... The releif effort that I've seen here is amazing. My house was finally lit up by a crew out of Detroit, Michigan. I've seen power crews on my street from as far away as Connecticut. I had a guy offer his services with a chainsaw absolutely free. Tractor trailer loads of free ice was dumped in the grocery parking lots.

What you guys are saying about foreign aid coming in is fantastic. And needed. I'm in contact with a buddy in Gulfport who says food is still the main concern down there. On the 6th he told me the cops and firefighters there are dealing with corpses like they've never seen and they are freaking out a little.

Tomorrow, I get a tetanus and hepatitus shot so I'll be ready when it's time to go south and help clean up. They say it will take months. My church is forming teams to help sister churches all along the coast with clean up, relocation, new jobs, etc. It's gonna be a long haul for lot of folks.

Pirschjaeger
09-07-2005, 11:55 PM
I'm happy you made it through relatively unscathed DxyFlyer. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

I hope the rest of your family and friends were as fortunate. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Fritz

DxyFlyr
09-08-2005, 12:12 AM
Thanks Pirschjaeger,

Four or five people that I "know of" (people I'd met but didn't really know)were lost in Gulfport, but no one that I really knew.

I lived in Pascagoula for a year. I'm not too worried about my friends/ coworkers there. I imagine they all got out. I haven't really kept in touch with them since I came here about 9 years ago.

The house of my boss was about 6 lots west of Trent Lott's house. I'm a little worried about him. He's the type to "ride 'em out". Lott's house was flattened, but I still see my boss' roof in the satellite images. that doesn't mean a whole lot though.

gombal40
09-08-2005, 02:43 AM
Originally posted by georgeo76:
There is money destroying the environment, there is money in reconstruction, but prevention is a charity.

We just don't do things well that are not profitable. If you don't believe me just look at the difference in security between a casino and an airport.

so so very true

Luftwaffe_109
09-08-2005, 03:10 AM
Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
Forget the politics, this is what you can expect from Americans.

Let's not also forget how the rest of the international community has also offered to help.

The following countries and organisations are currently offering aid to the US:

Afghanistan, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, the Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Cuba, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, the European Union, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, International Energy Agency, International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, Iran, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kosovo, Kuwait, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Mexico, NATO, Nepal, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Organization of American States, Oman, OPEC, Pakistan, Paraguay, the Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey, UAE, United Kingdom, the United Nations, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Venezuela and the World Health Organization.

Best Regards

Popey109
09-08-2005, 06:07 AM
Thanks Luftwaffe_109, it's nice to know we have friends http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif MMm, about Iran! They offered 20 million barrels of oil...but only if we lift sanctions...I€m not sure that€s a sincere offer. Barecat, I understand your frustration, but shifting gears from a relief effort to rescue, evac, and reestablishing order are two very different missions. Once command and control was lost on the ground, the play book goes out the window. It took 20,000 troops and all their support (you have feed them, house them, and provide sanitation) to reestablish control. We have a total of 60,000 there now€¦that€s become an occupation€¦of something like 90 thousand square miles! That€s a lot of ground to cover€¦

Luftwaffe_109
09-08-2005, 07:06 AM
They offered 20 million barrels of oil...but only if we lift sanctions...I€m not sure that€s a sincere offer.

Hi. My understanding was that sanctions would need to be lifted so that Iran could send the US oil aid? Iran hasn't stated (to my knowledge) if it wants the sanctions to be lifted permamently or only temporarily.

It quite a gesture of goodwill, in any case it's an excellent political move by Iran for obvious reasons.

Regards

Popey109
09-08-2005, 07:40 AM
Originally posted by Luftwaffe_109:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">They offered 20 million barrels of oil...but only if we lift sanctions...I€m not sure that€s a sincere offer.

Hi. My understanding was that sanctions would need to be lifted so that Iran could send the US oil aid? Iran hasn't stated (to my knowledge) if it wants the sanctions to be lifted permamently or only temporarily.

It quite a gesture of goodwill, in any case it's an excellent political move by Iran for obvious reasons.

Regards </div></BLOCKQUOTE>That may be true, but we didn€t lift sanction when we sent aid after the earthquakes that hit there. Granted, it was minimal aid, but it was a gesture of good will. It may be a sincere offer on their part, I don€t know, maybe it at least gets us talking€¦I will add again that I€m very grateful for the worlds response. Picking on Iran was bad form on my part and I shouldn€t have assumed the worst

Pirschjaeger
09-08-2005, 02:47 PM
Originally posted by Luftwaffe_109:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
Forget the politics, this is what you can expect from Americans.

Let's not also forget how the rest of the international community has also offered to help.

The following countries and organisations are currently offering aid to the US:

Afghanistan, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, the Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Cuba, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, the European Union, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, International Energy Agency, International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, Iran, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kosovo, Kuwait, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Mexico, NATO, Nepal, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Organization of American States, Oman, OPEC, Pakistan, Paraguay, the Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey, UAE, United Kingdom, the United Nations, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Venezuela and the World Health Organization.

Best Regards </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

LW-109, I know you are a smart guy, but wouldn't it have been easier to list those who didn't offer help? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Fritz

Mackane1
09-08-2005, 03:04 PM
Originally posted by georgeo76:
LOL, when I say politician are the best among us, I mean in a cultural achievement way. They are CEOs, Lawyers, Bankers, and Doctors, you know, successful? In other words, they played the America game, and won.

What about the "blue collar" that played the "American Game" and won? The ones who love doing what they do...carpenters, electricians, iron workers, etc...
They also consider themselves successful. I don't think "cultural" has anything to do with what you can make of yourself. That's one of the cool things about the "American Game".