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Baldricks_Mate
06-04-2005, 04:29 PM
Found a great book about US subs, called Blind Mans Bluff - The untold Story of Cold War Submarine Espionage by Sherry Sontag, Christoper Drew & Annette Lawrence Drew. What a read!

There is a chapter called "The Ballad of Whitey Mack" & he was the skipper of a sub called the Lapon. They tailed a Soviet Yankee for about a month collecting data. All underwater, they never knew he was there.

Another sub called the Halibut tapped an underwater telephone cable in the Sea of Okhotsk. When the Soviets eventually found it years later it it was stamped "Propery of the United States" Doh!

The book begins right after WW2 with stories of the diesel boats USS Cochino, Tusk, Gudgeon & more.

Those of you who like to get right into the enemy's ports in a storm or whatever cover you can find, sneak right up to that battleship & take a screen shot - http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif - because that kind of super snoop thing is the future of subs after WW2 & a lot of the technology to kick it off came from the Type XX1's...the nuclear power thing came later, much later.

"There a 400 pounder of TNT
'Bout to blow us to enternity.
Gee, I hate to see a grown man cry,
But goodness knows I'm too you to die.
Torpdeo in the water & it's closing fast."

from the song "Torpedo in the Water" by George "Tommy" Cox from an album of songs "Take Her Deep" (page 125)

Baldricks_Mate
06-04-2005, 04:29 PM
Found a great book about US subs, called Blind Mans Bluff - The untold Story of Cold War Submarine Espionage by Sherry Sontag, Christoper Drew & Annette Lawrence Drew. What a read!

There is a chapter called "The Ballad of Whitey Mack" & he was the skipper of a sub called the Lapon. They tailed a Soviet Yankee for about a month collecting data. All underwater, they never knew he was there.

Another sub called the Halibut tapped an underwater telephone cable in the Sea of Okhotsk. When the Soviets eventually found it years later it it was stamped "Propery of the United States" Doh!

The book begins right after WW2 with stories of the diesel boats USS Cochino, Tusk, Gudgeon & more.

Those of you who like to get right into the enemy's ports in a storm or whatever cover you can find, sneak right up to that battleship & take a screen shot - http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif - because that kind of super snoop thing is the future of subs after WW2 & a lot of the technology to kick it off came from the Type XX1's...the nuclear power thing came later, much later.

"There a 400 pounder of TNT
'Bout to blow us to enternity.
Gee, I hate to see a grown man cry,
But goodness knows I'm too you to die.
Torpdeo in the water & it's closing fast."

from the song "Torpedo in the Water" by George "Tommy" Cox from an album of songs "Take Her Deep" (page 125)

twistedpretzel
06-04-2005, 05:52 PM
Quite a few times russian and american ships actually collided together under water while following each other, another tid bit of info.

Baldricks_Mate
06-04-2005, 06:30 PM
Given the firepower that they carried, it is truly scary...the earlier listings are for diesel sub's.

1960: USS Swordfish SSN 579: collision with unidentified sub, surfacing from below it. Soviet Pacific coast.
1960's (early): USS Skipjack SSN 585? Gouged by propeller, Barents Sea.
1965, July: USS Medregal SS480: Collision with Greek cargo ship running guns, Gulf of Tonkin, Vietnam.
1966, March: USS Barbel SS 580: collision with unknown freighter running guns,near Hinan Island, near Gulf of Tonkin, Vietnam.
1967, December: USS George C Marshall SSBN 654: Collision with unknown Soviet sub, Mediterranean Sea.
1968, October: Unidentified US or RN sub: Collision with Soviet sub, incident repoerted by Soviets, Barents Sea.
1969, November: USS Gato SSN 615: collision with Soviet Hotel class sub, northern Pacific Ocean.
1970, USS Sturgeon SSN 637: collision with Soviet sub, Barents Sea.
1970, June, USS Tautog SSN 639: collision with Soviet sub Black Lila, an Echo 2 class sub, Barents Sea. The Soviet skipper's service record read: "Severely reprimanded by The Party for the collision with an American nuclear powered submarine in underwater position."
1971, USS Dace SSN 607: collision with Soviet sub, Mediterranean Sea.
1971 Unidentified Sub, collision with Soviet sub, Northern Soviet coast.
1972, USS Puffer SSN 652: collision with Soviet sub, Barents Sea.
1974, May: USS Pintado SSN 672: Collision with Soviet sub, Barents Sea.
1974, Novenber: USS James Maddison SSBN 627: collision with Soviet sub, near Holy Loch, Scotland.
1981: HMS Sceptre: collision with soviet sub, North Atlantic.
1986, August: USS Augusta SSN 710: collision with Soviet sub, Atlanic Ocean.
1986, December: HMS Splendid: collision with Soviet sub, Barents Sea.
1992, November: USS Baton Rouge SSN 689: collision with Soviet sub near Murmansk.
1993, March: USS Grayling SSN 646: collision with Delta 111, Barents Sea.

Thats just collisions known about and doesn't count close calls too numerous, classifed & with the rest of the world's navies.

Sorry about the long post...
.

AVGWarhawk
06-05-2005, 06:57 AM
From what I understand, todays submariners in training are required to read this book. And yes, it is a great book. Also, look up Black May. This is a great book one u-boats. You can get it for about six bucks. In this book, it has an account of two u-boats in a collision. both lost at sea as a result.

Corto
06-05-2005, 04:30 PM
...and don't forget the Kursk incident
(if there was no collision, surely was "observation")

twistedpretzel
06-05-2005, 04:57 PM
The Kursk had a torpedo problem if memory serves me correct.

AVGWarhawk
06-05-2005, 05:01 PM
So we are told!!!!!

Baldricks_Mate
06-05-2005, 05:34 PM
It is a fine old naval tradition to deny, cover up and bury "incidents" in endless red tape. When all else fails classify as much of it as you can. Eventually everyone loses interest except the dead guys families.

USS Scorpion, SSN 589, is classic example. It seems that a small metal foil diaphgram that activated the torpedeo engines partially ruptured, overheating the torp but without running the engine. That heat set of a low order detonation in the forward torpedo room while submerged...

The trouble is the dead guys aren't around to testify to the cause & the Admiral's need their butts covered.