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PlaneEater
07-20-2005, 02:54 AM
A post over on Netwings piqued my curiosity and dragged me into compiling this. I posted it over there, too, but thought folks here would probably find it interesting, too.

I've made a list kind of like this before a while back, but it was more flippant and had some major errors. This one is far, far more accurate. There are a few spots (mostly with Howard Hughes three ring circus worth of business divisions) where I simplified the convoluted chain of eatings, sales, divestments and mergers somewhat, but 95% of it should be correct.

So over at Netwings in this thread (http://forums.netwings.org/forums/showthread.php?t=171), somebody made a remark like this:

"Hell, most of the aircraft design companies from the 1940's aren't even around anymore!", he said.

I wish. Sort of.

The only truly "extinct" manufacturer is Brewster. Brewster was the subject of a congressional investigation due to, among a large number of things, vast mismanagement and poor business performance, and after essentially seizure by the US Navy, subsequently closed.

The rest have been eaten by and absorbed into others as a result of mergers and purchasings since WWII, mostly in the past decade (for the last time, antimonopoly / antitrust deregulation in volatile, multibillion-dollar markets is a bad thing, mmkay?).

Here's as comprehensive a list of the US aircraft manufacturers who built military aircraft during WWII and their fates as best I could compile (someone, please save this somewhere so I don't have to do it again):

<UL TYPE=SQUARE>
<LI>The Boeing Company: Eats companies. Hereafter referred to as 'The Boeing'.
<LI>Lockheed: Also eats companies. Now Lockheed-Martin.
<LI>Martin: Became Martin-Marietta in 1961, merged with Lockheed to form Lockheed-Martin in 1995, as above.
<LI>Vultee: Merged with Consolidated in 1943 to form Convair, then with Electric Boat to form General Dynamics in 1954. Essentially stopped producing aircraft in 1965, and was shut down completely in 1993.
<LI>Consolidated: Merged with Vultee in 1943, as above.
<LI>Douglas: Merged with McDonnell in 1967 to form McDonnell-Douglas. Eaten by The Boeing in 1997.
<LI>North American Aviation: Merged with North American Rockwell to form Rockwell International in 1967. Rockwell International's military business was eaten by The Boeing in 1996. Later seperations and mergers mean Rockwell International no longer exists. Interestingly, Piper Aircraft (of all people) now owns the blueprints and production rights to the P-51 Mustang.
<LI>Northrop: Merged with Grumman in 1994 to form the super evil conjoined twins of Northrop-Grumman.
<LI>Grumman: Merged with Northrop in 1994 (see above, spit when done).
<LI>Vought: Interesting one. Convoluted history, known at various points as Vought, Chance-Vought, and Ling-Temco-Vought. Now called simply Vought. Northrop-Grumman appears to have eaten the Vought Aircraft division in 1994.
<LI>Bell: Eaten by Texatron in 1960. They build pretty much only whirlybirds now.
<LI>Curtiss-Wright: Massively shifted gears when props and radial engines went out of vogue. Evolved into a completely unrelated field--makes things such as valves, generators, actuators, and parts for nuclear subs now. North American Aviation ate their beleagured aircraft division in 1948.
<LI>Seversky: Became Republic in 1939.
<LI>Republic: Eaten by Fairchild in 1965. Not content with Republic P-47s mopping the floor with them 51 years earlier, Repbulic-Fairchild took over most of Dornier GmbH in 1996, but later became insolvent and was in turn eaten by M7 Aerospace in 2002.
<LI>Hughes: Howard 'donated' Hughes Aircraft to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in 1953, thus making it conveniently tax-exempt. General Motors ate Hughes Aircraft (but not the HHMI itself) in 1985. In 1997, Hughes Electronics (which included Hughes Aircraft) was eaten by Raytheon. The other portions of Hughes' companies (such as Hughes Space and Communications, Hughes Electronics, and Hughes Network Systems) were variously eaten by Newscorp and The Boeing.
<LI>Beech: Eaten by Raytheon in 1980. Still cranking out Bonanzas.
<LI>Cessna: Eaten by Texatron in 1992. Still cranking out Skyhawks.
[/list]

So yeah. I think that's all of them.

I really don't feel like doing the British, German, Italian, Soviet, and Japanese right now. ESPECIALLY the defeated Axis nations--there were clauses in the surrender documents and subsequent interim government rulings that muddle the roots of companies like Messerschmitt and Nakajima beyond simple internet research.

Somebody please, PLEASE save this somewhere so I don't have to do it again.

PlaneEater
07-20-2005, 02:54 AM
A post over on Netwings piqued my curiosity and dragged me into compiling this. I posted it over there, too, but thought folks here would probably find it interesting, too.

I've made a list kind of like this before a while back, but it was more flippant and had some major errors. This one is far, far more accurate. There are a few spots (mostly with Howard Hughes three ring circus worth of business divisions) where I simplified the convoluted chain of eatings, sales, divestments and mergers somewhat, but 95% of it should be correct.

So over at Netwings in this thread (http://forums.netwings.org/forums/showthread.php?t=171), somebody made a remark like this:

"Hell, most of the aircraft design companies from the 1940's aren't even around anymore!", he said.

I wish. Sort of.

The only truly "extinct" manufacturer is Brewster. Brewster was the subject of a congressional investigation due to, among a large number of things, vast mismanagement and poor business performance, and after essentially seizure by the US Navy, subsequently closed.

The rest have been eaten by and absorbed into others as a result of mergers and purchasings since WWII, mostly in the past decade (for the last time, antimonopoly / antitrust deregulation in volatile, multibillion-dollar markets is a bad thing, mmkay?).

Here's as comprehensive a list of the US aircraft manufacturers who built military aircraft during WWII and their fates as best I could compile (someone, please save this somewhere so I don't have to do it again):

<UL TYPE=SQUARE>
<LI>The Boeing Company: Eats companies. Hereafter referred to as 'The Boeing'.
<LI>Lockheed: Also eats companies. Now Lockheed-Martin.
<LI>Martin: Became Martin-Marietta in 1961, merged with Lockheed to form Lockheed-Martin in 1995, as above.
<LI>Vultee: Merged with Consolidated in 1943 to form Convair, then with Electric Boat to form General Dynamics in 1954. Essentially stopped producing aircraft in 1965, and was shut down completely in 1993.
<LI>Consolidated: Merged with Vultee in 1943, as above.
<LI>Douglas: Merged with McDonnell in 1967 to form McDonnell-Douglas. Eaten by The Boeing in 1997.
<LI>North American Aviation: Merged with North American Rockwell to form Rockwell International in 1967. Rockwell International's military business was eaten by The Boeing in 1996. Later seperations and mergers mean Rockwell International no longer exists. Interestingly, Piper Aircraft (of all people) now owns the blueprints and production rights to the P-51 Mustang.
<LI>Northrop: Merged with Grumman in 1994 to form the super evil conjoined twins of Northrop-Grumman.
<LI>Grumman: Merged with Northrop in 1994 (see above, spit when done).
<LI>Vought: Interesting one. Convoluted history, known at various points as Vought, Chance-Vought, and Ling-Temco-Vought. Now called simply Vought. Northrop-Grumman appears to have eaten the Vought Aircraft division in 1994.
<LI>Bell: Eaten by Texatron in 1960. They build pretty much only whirlybirds now.
<LI>Curtiss-Wright: Massively shifted gears when props and radial engines went out of vogue. Evolved into a completely unrelated field--makes things such as valves, generators, actuators, and parts for nuclear subs now. North American Aviation ate their beleagured aircraft division in 1948.
<LI>Seversky: Became Republic in 1939.
<LI>Republic: Eaten by Fairchild in 1965. Not content with Republic P-47s mopping the floor with them 51 years earlier, Repbulic-Fairchild took over most of Dornier GmbH in 1996, but later became insolvent and was in turn eaten by M7 Aerospace in 2002.
<LI>Hughes: Howard 'donated' Hughes Aircraft to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in 1953, thus making it conveniently tax-exempt. General Motors ate Hughes Aircraft (but not the HHMI itself) in 1985. In 1997, Hughes Electronics (which included Hughes Aircraft) was eaten by Raytheon. The other portions of Hughes' companies (such as Hughes Space and Communications, Hughes Electronics, and Hughes Network Systems) were variously eaten by Newscorp and The Boeing.
<LI>Beech: Eaten by Raytheon in 1980. Still cranking out Bonanzas.
<LI>Cessna: Eaten by Texatron in 1992. Still cranking out Skyhawks.
[/list]

So yeah. I think that's all of them.

I really don't feel like doing the British, German, Italian, Soviet, and Japanese right now. ESPECIALLY the defeated Axis nations--there were clauses in the surrender documents and subsequent interim government rulings that muddle the roots of companies like Messerschmitt and Nakajima beyond simple internet research.

Somebody please, PLEASE save this somewhere so I don't have to do it again.

PlaneEater
07-20-2005, 08:05 AM
The more I think about it, the more interesting it sounds to document where the other nations' manufacturers have ended up. The ones I can think of off the top of my head:

Britain:
--Hawker
--Avro
--Bolton
--Siddley
--whoever built the Spitfire
--Short (Short Stirling, Short Sunderland, 'Short' was the company, right?)

Germany:
--Junkers
--Heinkel
--Messerschmitt
--Blomm und Voss
--Focke Wulf
--Arado
--Gotha
--Dornier
--Henschel
--Lippisch

Italy:
--not familiar with the Italian design bureaus. Would be nice if one of the Club Med guys could fill this in

Japan:
--Mitsubishi
--Nakajima
--Kawanishi
--I know there were others

Russia:
--Mikhovan
--Gurevich
--Lavchokin
--Yakolev
--Ilyushin
--I know there were more. I should be ashamed I don't remember.


If somebody wants to help flesh out and research these lists, or expand it to engine manufacturers (or both), go ahead and chime in.

telsono
07-20-2005, 10:38 AM
As for the Italians, I know that Macchi is now known as Aermacchi and is still in business. Fiat is part of that industrial giant and is still in operation.

Others were:
Reggianne
Imam-Ro
Breda
Cansa (Fiat subsidiary)
Cant
Caproni
Meridonali
Nardi
Piaggio
Savoia-Marchetti
etal
(excused spelling errors, many of these companies are inter-related)

Spitfires were made by the Supermarine division of Vickers. The Wellingtons by the main branch.

Rolls-Royce split the car manufacturing from the aero engine branch when the later looked to becoming insolvent. By an odd twist during the late 1980's the auto branch went sour and the aero engine branch stayed solid. The Rolls-Royce symbol is held by the aero engine manufacturing etity. As of now the car manufacturer is owned by BMW after a brief period owned by Volkswagen in a strange convuluted deal.

Fury_352FG
07-20-2005, 10:44 AM
Eventually they may all be eaten by the Wal-Mart. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

RNZAFJay
07-20-2005, 10:52 AM
2020

The next generation fighter

the Microsoft F/A-50XP "Windows Fighter(tm)".

nakamura_kenji
07-20-2005, 10:52 AM
britain
brstol built blenhiem
supermarine built spitfire

japan
ki-61 built kawasaki

RNZAFJay
07-20-2005, 10:55 AM
Mitsubishi and Kawasaki still exist though to my knowledge only Mitsubishi Heavy Industries make aircraft like the F-15J and the new F-2 (bascially a bigger more powerful F-16).

Kawasaki now make motorbikes, not sure what else.

Nakjima probably got eaten by Mitsubishi.

nakamura_kenji
07-20-2005, 10:58 AM
kawasaki still make helicopter ^_^

http://www.futura-dtp.dk/Flysiden/images/OH1.jpg

One13
07-20-2005, 11:25 AM
British manufacturers of WW2 from Janes:-
Airspeed
Armstrong Whitworth
Avro
Blackburn
Boulton Paul
Bristol
De Havilland
Fairey
Folland
General Aircraft
Gloster
Handley Page
Hawker
Martin-Baker
Miles
Percival
Saro
Short
Supermarine
Vickers-Armstrongs
Westland

Virtually all of these were amalgamated/nationalised as British Aerospace which today makes wings for Airbus among other things. Short I belive are still going making aircraft. Westland after the war concentrated on helicopters and was bought by Augusta. Martin-Baker stopped making aeroplanes and designed and built ejection seats which they do still today.

One13
07-20-2005, 11:35 AM
Japanese manufacturers of WW2 from Francillion;-
Nakajima
Mitsubishi
Kawasaki
Tachikawa
Aichi
Nippon Hikoki
Kyushu
Mansyu
Kokusai
Kawanishi
Hitachi
Tachiarai
Fuji
Showa
Tokyo
Mitsui
Matsush ita
Also-
Navy Air Arsenals
Rikugun

nakamura_kenji
07-20-2005, 11:39 AM
wasnt company called BAC that built Electric lightning jet interceptor?

One13
07-20-2005, 11:50 AM
BAC was British Aircraft Corporation, which evolved into British Aerospace.
English Electric Company I seem to recollect was the aircraft division of GEC, this part of GEC was amalgamated into BAC.

Philipscdrw
07-20-2005, 11:53 AM
"English Electric" built the Lightning interceptor.

Some foolish Labour government decided to merge all the British aircraft companies into two big private companies in the mid-sixties, forming Hawker-Siddeley and the British Aircraft Corporation (BAC). These were then merged and nationalised, and became British Aerospace, which then became privatised again. Shorts and Westland didn't get merged, and Martin-Baker wasn't involved either.

Essentially, all the British manufacturers became BAe.