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Treetop64
12-25-2005, 11:29 PM
...my new homebuilt PC, that is! Speaking to you from it now as I type.

Final system specs:

> CPU - Intel Pentium 4 670 @ 3.8GHz
> Board - ASUS P5LD2 Deluxe
> Graphics - ATI X1800XL PCI-Express
> Sound - Sound Blaster Audigy 2
> RAM - Patriot DDR2, 5300-667MHz, 2GB
> Hard Disk - Western Digital SATA 2, 300MB/s, 250GB
> Power - SilverStone Strider, 650W continuous, 700W peak
> Case - SilverStone TJ06, Dual 120mm plus one 80mm fan, integrated CPU wind tunnel

The optical drives, keyboard, speakers, and monitor were canniballized from the old system.

If I had a digital camera I'd take pictures, but with all the spending on Christmas shopping and the new PC my wallet started crying foul... So the camera will have to wait.

The case is very pleasing to look at. It's quite tall (566mm), has a key-lock, fully opening front face, and is made of brushed aluminium, painted black. Quite a slick, modern look to it.

The raw performance of the new machine is a friggin' quantum-leap from the old system - which by the way, was no slouch itself. All my older games run so fast now that the concept of "frames per second" is simply a non-event, even with maximum graphical detail settings. I'm now getting from 40 to 60+ FPS on everthing (NASCAR Thunder 2004, GTR GT Racing, Silent Hunter III, Flight Simulator 2004, Lock-On, and of course, Pacific Fighters Merged, among many others).

Even my newest game, Call of Duty 2 (which brought my old system to it's knees, and promted this whole PC building venture in the first place), steams along at identical FPS levels! I was pretty much amazed by this.

I'm very anxious to see how BoB will run on it...

I now have a rockin' system, my freinds!

Treetop64
12-25-2005, 11:29 PM
...my new homebuilt PC, that is! Speaking to you from it now as I type.

Final system specs:

> CPU - Intel Pentium 4 670 @ 3.8GHz
> Board - ASUS P5LD2 Deluxe
> Graphics - ATI X1800XL PCI-Express
> Sound - Sound Blaster Audigy 2
> RAM - Patriot DDR2, 5300-667MHz, 2GB
> Hard Disk - Western Digital SATA 2, 300MB/s, 250GB
> Power - SilverStone Strider, 650W continuous, 700W peak
> Case - SilverStone TJ06, Dual 120mm plus one 80mm fan, integrated CPU wind tunnel

The optical drives, keyboard, speakers, and monitor were canniballized from the old system.

If I had a digital camera I'd take pictures, but with all the spending on Christmas shopping and the new PC my wallet started crying foul... So the camera will have to wait.

The case is very pleasing to look at. It's quite tall (566mm), has a key-lock, fully opening front face, and is made of brushed aluminium, painted black. Quite a slick, modern look to it.

The raw performance of the new machine is a friggin' quantum-leap from the old system - which by the way, was no slouch itself. All my older games run so fast now that the concept of "frames per second" is simply a non-event, even with maximum graphical detail settings. I'm now getting from 40 to 60+ FPS on everthing (NASCAR Thunder 2004, GTR GT Racing, Silent Hunter III, Flight Simulator 2004, Lock-On, and of course, Pacific Fighters Merged, among many others).

Even my newest game, Call of Duty 2 (which brought my old system to it's knees, and promted this whole PC building venture in the first place), steams along at identical FPS levels! I was pretty much amazed by this.

I'm very anxious to see how BoB will run on it...

I now have a rockin' system, my freinds!

zoinksu52
12-26-2005, 12:25 AM
oh my new pc...her elegant lines...the soft purr of her fans... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/heart.gif

dood, get a room! j/k

i built one 2 months ago and i had to get a room also.

Treetop64
12-26-2005, 01:20 AM
I'm already there, "Dood"... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/heart.gif

Bearcat99
12-26-2005, 09:30 AM
I know the feeling.... after building 4 PCs from scratch.. with the first one being like yours in the sense that.. it was the foirst time I had attemted it and I was quite pleased with myself that it worked.... I will never buy a prebuilt computer again.

Chuck_Older
12-26-2005, 09:47 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Treetop64:
...my new homebuilt PC, that is! Speaking to you from it now as I type.

Final system specs:

&gt; CPU - Intel Pentium 4 670 @ 3.8GHz
&gt; Board - ASUS P5LD2 Deluxe
&gt; Graphics - ATI X1800XL PCI-Express
&gt; Sound - Sound Blaster Audigy 2
&gt; RAM - Patriot DDR2, 5300-667MHz, 2GB
&gt; Hard Disk - Western Digital SATA 2, 300MB/s, 250GB
&gt; Power - SilverStone Strider, 650W continuous, 700W peak
&gt; Case - SilverStone TJ06, Dual 120mm plus one 80mm fan, integrated CPU wind tunnel

The optical drives, keyboard, speakers, and monitor were canniballized from the old system.

If I had a digital camera I'd take pictures, but with all the spending on Christmas shopping and the new PC my wallet started crying foul... So the camera will have to wait.

The case is very pleasing to look at. It's quite tall (566mm), has a key-lock, fully opening front face, and is made of brushed aluminium, painted black. Quite a slick, modern look to it.

The raw performance of the new machine is a friggin' quantum-leap from the old system - which by the way, was no slouch itself. All my older games run so fast now that the concept of "frames per second" is simply a non-event, even with maximum graphical detail settings. I'm now getting from 40 to 60+ FPS on everthing (NASCAR Thunder 2004, GTR GT Racing, Silent Hunter III, Flight Simulator 2004, Lock-On, and of course, Pacific Fighters Merged, among many others).

Even my newest game, Call of Duty 2 (which brought my old system to it's knees, and promted this whole PC building venture in the first place), steams along at identical FPS levels! I was pretty much amazed by this.

I'm very anxious to see how BoB will run on it...

I now have a rockin' system, my freinds! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Where'd you get the stuff, how much did it cost, where'd you get drivers and which ones, and what did you do to get it all together, please

steve_v
12-26-2005, 11:52 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Ha, HAA! It's Working! It's Working!! ...my new homebuilt PC, that is! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Congradulations on the new build.

SeaFireLIV
12-26-2005, 12:28 PM
` Ha, HAA! It's Working! It's Working!! `

You been watching too much ET!

Phil_C
12-26-2005, 12:40 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">All my older games run so fast now that the concept of "frames per second" is simply a non-event, even with maximum graphical detail settings. I'm now getting from 40 to 60+ FPS on everthing </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Isnt it fantastic to finally be able to run programs the way they were intended?

Congrats on the new system... i know when i got mine a few weeks ago i couldnt get enough of the old games, let alone getting around to installing newer games and trying them out... (Starwars BF2 is awesome, and looks awesome when you jack up the graphics options)

LEBillfish
12-26-2005, 01:15 PM
Just an FYI for all here who have not built there own.......

Places like Dell & Gateway, etc. price wise really cannot compare with a home built if apples to apples and that's if they even offer the combination you want.......However, though the assembly (physical) is easy, the thought of getting it to run, more so work together at it's peak is a daunting one at best.....Setting up an OS and the peripherials a reason to make you think twice on a home built....

Solution?.....Find a local shop that you'd buy your pieces parts from by price...Then consider how's their service (and here IMLTHO is where it counts as small shops service normally better, and being close you can face to face if need be)..........Now, tell them all the parts you want, then ask "how much for you to build it, partition the drives as I want, & get the OS & peripherial software installed and working?

Price I found to do that............$50.00

$50.00 well worth the hassle and agrivation...and if you're tight on money ask yourself this......If you had to spend 8-16 hours building, installing software (how long does it take to install some of it http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif..quite a while), then most of all debug it and INSURE it is working......How much could you make dollars wise working instead?

Lastly, since they built it...you now have tech and service support.......

Only way I'll build another.....then alter it after as you go.

bolox00
12-26-2005, 03:24 PM
congrats on the new rig-the case is great isn't it?- just built a new rig myself using this case aswell.
glad yours is running as sweetly as mine.
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Treetop64
12-26-2005, 06:20 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Chuck_Older:
Where'd you get the stuff, how much did it cost, where'd you get drivers and which ones, and what did you do to get it all together, please </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

With the exception of the motherboard, I got everything from Fry's Electronics. I live just 15 minutes walking distance from them, so it was easy to get there. Also, with the exception of monitors, their prices are very competitive with the best online stores, and in some cases are even better priced. Plus, you get the added benefit of immediate ownership of items purchased, and hassle-free return policies. The Christmas crowds were murder, though...

&gt; CPU - $650
&gt; Board - $210 (TigerDirect.com)
&gt; Graphics Card - $370
&gt; Sound - $65
&gt; RAM - $275
&gt; Disk - $175
&gt; Power - $175
&gt; Case - $160

Total = $2080.00 - This is a close approximation of what was spent, as I'm going by memory and did not have all the reciepts in front of me. Please note that a new monitor was not purchased, and a quality product would have easily pushed the total up to the upper $2000's to over $3000.

I initially used the retail drivers for the video card and motherboard, then later downloaded updated versions online.

Physically putting it all together was a breeze, as Billfish eluded to earlier, but is very time consuming if you wish to do it right. Getting a "tooless" type of case will ease this phase considerably. Installing the cards and other hardware are no-brainers, but the more tedious task is connecting the myriad of power cables, data cables, LED connectors, etc., from all the auxiliary items to the motherboard.

I was moving very slowly and deliberately when putting it all together, and it took more than 5 hours from unwrapping everything to plugging in and powering up. It pays to be careful and deliberate while assembling - it's easy to get tired and/or impatient. Besides, triple-checking everthing as it was done ensured a successful initial boot-up of the system, and I was quite pleased with this indeed! It also pays dividends to pre-read the manuals before you even start putting anything together. I can't stress that enough!

One more thing: Use a grounding strap.

Installing the OS is pretty much automatic. Boot-up the machine with no disks in any of the drives, and the BIOS will instruct you to insert the OS CD. Once you do that, the OS installation process goes just like any other software installation - just follow the on-screen prompts. Again, read the manuals (especially the motherboard manual) ahead of time!

Once that's done, and your hard drive is configured, you're home free! Just install all your other stuff from there and you're good to go. Just allow yourself a few hours, depending on your hardware configuration and amount of software to install, to complete the installation phase.

Treetop64
12-26-2005, 06:25 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by SeaFireLIV:
` Ha, HAA! It's Working! It's Working!! `

You been watching too much ET! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Actually, I was thinking of Anakin Skywalker's startup of his podracer after working on it in Star Wars Episode I http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

LEXX_Luthor
12-26-2005, 07:04 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">..my new homebuilt PC, that is! Speaking to you from it now as I type. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Ah, another first time Home Builder. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

What was it like, the Panic when pushing the power button for the second time (the first time nothing ever happens as we "forget" to hook something up) and the Terror of watching the BIOS startup. Aussom!!

Bartolomeo_ita
12-26-2005, 07:11 PM
does it make the lunch? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Treetop64
12-26-2005, 08:01 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by LEXX_Luthor:
What was it like, the Panic when pushing the power button for the second time (the first time nothing ever happens as we "forget" to hook something up) and the Terror of watching the BIOS startup. Aussom!! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Actually, everything worked on the first power-up! At the time however, I was psyching myself into thinking that nothing would work, I hooked up something incorrectly, I static charged and dameged something, etc.

However, that initial BIOS sequence really had my heart racing! I never thought you could get an adrenalene rush from buildin PCs! No drama occured, though. None at all.

Beginner's luck, I guess...

Treetop64
12-26-2005, 08:02 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Bartolomeo_ita:
does it make the lunch? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It makes the lunch, breakfast, and dinner!

92SqnGCJimbo
12-26-2005, 08:50 PM
thats what maes me laugh about people who have never built a computer before... what they dont realise is a computer will only fit together a certain way.. as all the sockets are desiges for that... i just upgraded my old computer..
new amd sempron s754 3000 ‚£68
nvidia 7800 gt ‚£240
asus motherboard... (its on top of wardrobe so i cant find exact one)‚£50
0o and a new 500 watt psu‚£16
all bought from scan computers in bolton

redfeathers1948
12-26-2005, 09:11 PM
funny I just bought the idiots guide to building your own computer, looks like its time to bust out of the buying the top of the line Dells mode... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

LEBillfish
12-26-2005, 10:52 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by 92SqnGCJimbo:
thats what maes me laugh about people who have never built a computer before... what they dont realise is a computer will only fit together a certain way.. as all the sockets are desiges for that... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Not really......I have a what was the top of the line intel server type board with raid and other fun stuff built in.....It has 2 blocks of roughly 10 pins each to run various things like firewire, bells whistles and lights plus all the other standard blocks.....The Anatec server case has all those wires AND their grounds on seperate leads....Unfortunately not listed as to color....took a call to Anatec to get what was what...then instead of just plugging them in, I bundled them up to MAKE them a simple plug in. Lastly, I run a seperate power supply to power ALL my fans except the processor....that's now 16 more (3/80mm in, 3/80+1/120 out, 2 small over ram heatsinks, 1 chipset heatsink, 2 AGP card sandwiched, 2 voodoo card, 1 sound card, 1 special routing to primary power supply) all exaust routed out of the room, intake through a chiller box (really nothing more then sealed round aluminum ducting 8' into the ground then up).....Like a hurricane http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Also folks remember to get your wires and cables tight to the case making air flow as clean as possible. You'd be surprised how much cooling can be harmed by wires simply everywhere.

zoinksu52
12-26-2005, 11:12 PM
building a pc is very easy. its all a question of how much knowledge you have and the battle into the unknown for beginners. once you have all the parts assembly is fairly simple and straightforward.

part selection is where knowledge is key. and for the beginner is the toughest and most confusing. i've built at least 600 for jobs and friends and i spent 1 - 2 months deciding what to get on my last build when i considered compatability/price/performance/reliability/manufacter warranty. my lastest:

lain-li pc-7b plus
pc power & cooling turbo-cool 510/sli
asus a8n-sli premium
3700+ san diego w/zalman 7000b-alcu
crucial value 2x1g
plextor 740a
hitachi t7k250 250gb sata2
evga 7800gtx ko
esi juli@

it runs silent hunter 3 at 1600x1200(with 3rd party .dll) at 45fps and above except in harbor with rubini's mod at 20fps min. runs this sim great but i've spent most of my time learning to fly i've yet to really test. its on 24/7 and rare to see it crash.

basic parts:
case
power supply
motherboard
cpu w/cooling fan
memory/ram
harddrive
video card
keyoard
mouse
sound card(or use motherboard onboard)

got my stuff:
http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php
http://www.newegg.com/
http://www.frozencpu.com/

couple places to find info. read forums to see what's popular amd what people like then follow up finding reviews on those parts.
http://hardforum.com/
http://www.anandtech.com/

tips:
1.never use a cheap power supply.
2.memory is constantly changing due to new chips/factory shortages causing shorter product lines. buy your all your ram at the same time.
3.brace yourself for video card prices.


pros:
1.pick and choose parts best for you.
2.no more bogus dell and gateway system recover disks. you get to use a real microsoft version.
3.learning to format your hard drive and load windows, sp2, and all your drivers will provide self sufficiency. you will never be at the knees for tech support. you can fix it yourself. learn your pc and don't be afraid of it.

cons:
1.learning curve
2.you become a geek.

Worf101
12-27-2005, 07:57 AM
I've built 4 PC's over the last 5 years. The first time was a nightmare an absolute disaster with 3 RMA mobo's. After that it got easier and easier to the point now where I have abosolutely NO FEAR at doing a complete from scratch build. Billifish's suggestion about a local shop doing your build for you is nice, but it can be pricey...

99th Worf101

Grue_
12-29-2005, 02:54 AM
Just built this one:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v458/flyingscampi/IMG_0141.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v458/flyingscampi/IMG_0112.jpg

Water cooled, almost silent flat out http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Slechtvalk
12-29-2005, 07:36 AM
Power - SilverStone Strider, 650W continuous, 700W peak.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif


700 watt.. crazy.
Btw you can run a 7800GTX with a dual core 4400+ and 2 harddisk with 400w just fine and still got plenty of power left.

Myself got a 6800GT and 3000xp, super stable and only 250w powersupply. Il-2 never crashes.

TheMoon7x
01-03-2006, 12:12 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Treetop64:


With the exception of the motherboard, I got everything from Fry's Electronics. I live just 15 minutes walking distance from them, so it was easy to get there. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

did u actually have to WALK there??? is buying computer parts more important than having transportation??? LOL hope u own some comfortable shoes!

i built a computer this past summer, my first ever. the dang thing kept crashing when it was booting up. replaced the mobo, hdd, cdrom, and windows xp! was still crashing! so it was either the processor or the memory, turns out it was the later of the 2. it was a pain in the rear but man i remember that rush of "holy cow! i built this thing, its a beast! i gotta tell everyone! even if they don't understand!" glad to see more people are building their own computers b/c it is most definitely cheaper than buying one pre-built.

dunno about the rest of ya but i got started by going to intel's website and they had a little guide that told ya everything ya needed to build a computer. so i found that shopping dot com website, where they have all the info on so many different products, u can tell whats compatable and whats not. so much fun figuring that stuff out.

turnipkiller
01-04-2006, 08:30 AM
I have never built a computer and although it is kind of terrifying, I am thinking of trying to do so when money permits. For now I am slowly trying to learn about building one.
I saw something called a bare bones system. From what I gather, you add your own things to it. Are they something worth looking at? They seem to have huge cases for lots of extra items.

Airmail109
01-04-2006, 10:17 AM
Buliding and then seting up PCs is actually dead easy i fyou follow the instructions, Installing windows is very easy.....

-HH-Quazi
01-04-2006, 11:13 AM
I still get a kick out of building my first rig, and that was in March of last year. Now it is just a matter of replacing certain components as needed to upgrade. Of course if replacing a mobo as an upgrade, you might as well be considered to be building a new one as a reinstall of the OS will probably be necessary.

zoinksu52
01-04-2006, 04:51 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by turnipkiller:
I have never built a computer and although it is kind of terrifying, I am thinking of trying to do so when money permits. For now I am slowly trying to learn about building one.
I saw something called a bare bones system. From what I gather, you add your own things to it. Are they something worth looking at? They seem to have huge cases for lots of extra items. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

barebones is usually a case, power supply, and motherboard sold together at a slight discount. there are some places that offer combos, too. some setup and test parts before shipping. here's a link to a place that does.
http://www.monarchcomputer.com
take a look at their barebones and combos to get an idea. fyi, i've never done business with them so i can't vouch on their reputation.