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jamesdeanoo7
08-19-2008, 08:42 AM
I spent many years as a young boy reading through every book I could find on WW1 aces. Truth be told it is actually more likely the real top WW1 ace was a guy called Mick Mannock. I say this with no disrespect just an educated opinion. Mannock would often give away kills, this was documented in other pilots biographies...one source was IRA jones who flew as a rookie with him and watched him shoot down 2 planes ther encountered. When they returned he gave them to Jones. Jones only admitted to this many years later. Richtoven was rightly idolised but its safe to assume alot was embellished as all nations needed heros.He was actually awarded victories that history now shows he achieved while hospitalised. Strange he should finish one kill more than Mannock.Also every kill by an allied pilot had to have physical proof. A really nice part for me about Mannock was his personallity, he hated the enemy, didnt respect them at all and as he was trying to get back to England to fight was actually arrested by the germans and then released as he was disabled. His story would make a great movie...if anyone ever knew about it.Like I say its just my personal opinion and I respect anyone that got into one of those aircraft and flew into battle.

jamesdeanoo7
08-19-2008, 08:42 AM
I spent many years as a young boy reading through every book I could find on WW1 aces. Truth be told it is actually more likely the real top WW1 ace was a guy called Mick Mannock. I say this with no disrespect just an educated opinion. Mannock would often give away kills, this was documented in other pilots biographies...one source was IRA jones who flew as a rookie with him and watched him shoot down 2 planes ther encountered. When they returned he gave them to Jones. Jones only admitted to this many years later. Richtoven was rightly idolised but its safe to assume alot was embellished as all nations needed heros.He was actually awarded victories that history now shows he achieved while hospitalised. Strange he should finish one kill more than Mannock.Also every kill by an allied pilot had to have physical proof. A really nice part for me about Mannock was his personallity, he hated the enemy, didnt respect them at all and as he was trying to get back to England to fight was actually arrested by the germans and then released as he was disabled. His story would make a great movie...if anyone ever knew about it.Like I say its just my personal opinion and I respect anyone that got into one of those aircraft and flew into battle.

waffen-79
08-19-2008, 09:27 AM
Mannock's life, a movie I would watch indeed

DKoor
08-19-2008, 06:10 PM
Some probably had more than they actually score, some had less...

Who knows?

I only know that some people were real aces, top pilots, in spite of lesser scores, while others weren't that great (compared to these) in spite of greater scores.

It depends on many factors.

Tab_Flettner
08-19-2008, 08:46 PM
Raymond Collishaw. Sopwith Tripe. Black Maria, if memory serves. That would be a movie.

Phas3e
08-19-2008, 11:58 PM
'Grid' Caldwell

Landed his damaged Se5 standing on the wing and controlling it from the outside.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2262/2319893271_6f4dcc4341_o.jpg

jamesdeanoo7
08-20-2008, 05:47 AM
I agree with all of this guys.Like I said I intend no disrespect to any of those brave guys. There were so many that interesting. For me it was a real interesting time in combat aviation. The planes were mostly unique and recognisable.Alot of those guys knew each other in the air and at those speeds in those planes it really was flying skills. Also of course alot of records were destroyed or ever saw the light of day. The japanese for example had many aces but even today they go unknown.I guess being an old fart in my days as a boy they were my heros as I was closer to the momement.

Buzzsaw-
08-20-2008, 11:24 AM
Salute

William Barker:

Canadian won VC flying Sopwith Snipe in singlehanded combat vs some 30 Fokker DVII`s, shooting down 4. Combat was witnessed by thousands of soldiers in the trenches. Overall victories 50.

"On the morning of the October 27, 1918, this officer observed an enemy two-seater over the Foret de Mormal. He attacked this machine and after a short burst it broke up in the air. At the same time a Fokker biplane attacked him, and he was wounded in the right thigh, but managed, despite this, to shoot down the enemy aeroplane in flames. He then found himself in the middle of a large formation of Fokkers who attacked him from all directions, and was again severely wounded in the left thigh, but succeeded in driving down two of the enemy in a spin. He lost consciousness after that, and his machine fell out of control. On recovery, he found himself being again attacked heavily by a large formation, and singling out one machine he deliberately charged and drove it down in flames. During this fight his left elbow was shattered and he again fainted, and on regaining consciousness he found himself still being attacked, but notwithstanding that he was now severely wounded in both legs and his left arm shattered, he dived on the nearest machine and shot it down in flames. Being greatly exhausted, he dived out of the fight to regain our lines, but was met by another formation, which attacked and endeavored to cut him off, but after a hard fight he succeeded in breaking up this formation and reached our lines, where he crashed on landing. This combat, in which Major Barker destroyed four enemy machines (three of them in flames), brought his total successes to fifty enemy machines destroyed, and is a notable example of the exceptional bravery and disregard of danger which this very gallant officer has always displayed throughout his distinguished career." VC citation, London Gazette, November 30, 1918

After the war, he ran an airline for a while, as well as barnstorming, before dying in a flying accident. Eddie Rickenbacker and Billy Bishop, who both flew against him in simulated combats called him the best fighter pilot they had ever met, despite the fact that when they flew against him, he was restricted to one arm, the other never recovered from the bullets which shattered it during his VC exploit.