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dreamofmirrors7
11-25-2010, 05:52 AM
I was just thinking about the motto of the Assassins, "Nothing is true, everything is permitted."

Now, most would believe that an assassin would live by this motto, after the tenants of the creed.

Stay your blade from the flesh of an innocent.

Always be discreet.

Never compromise the Brotherhood.

Now, what is of more importance? Which is THE 1st rule?

Because if "Nothing is true" and "Everything is permitted", then the Creed itself is not safe from these guidelines. A true assassin would not believe the Creed, and would be permitted to break all of it's rules.

Altair essentially did this at the beginning of AC 1, which is why Al Mualim revoked his assassin status and made him regain his place.

But then, wasn't Al Mualim secretly a Templar? Only using the Brotherhood to find the Apple for his own ends? Doesn't that mean that by disobeying the 3 tenants of the Creed that you then become a TRUE assassin?

Just my thoughts on it, I thought it was intriguing and I was wondering what everyone else thought.

EDIT: Who was the creator of the Creed? I don't remember it actually being said, but someone please enlighten me if they know.

dreamofmirrors7
11-25-2010, 05:52 AM
I was just thinking about the motto of the Assassins, "Nothing is true, everything is permitted."

Now, most would believe that an assassin would live by this motto, after the tenants of the creed.

Stay your blade from the flesh of an innocent.

Always be discreet.

Never compromise the Brotherhood.

Now, what is of more importance? Which is THE 1st rule?

Because if "Nothing is true" and "Everything is permitted", then the Creed itself is not safe from these guidelines. A true assassin would not believe the Creed, and would be permitted to break all of it's rules.

Altair essentially did this at the beginning of AC 1, which is why Al Mualim revoked his assassin status and made him regain his place.

But then, wasn't Al Mualim secretly a Templar? Only using the Brotherhood to find the Apple for his own ends? Doesn't that mean that by disobeying the 3 tenants of the Creed that you then become a TRUE assassin?

Just my thoughts on it, I thought it was intriguing and I was wondering what everyone else thought.

EDIT: Who was the creator of the Creed? I don't remember it actually being said, but someone please enlighten me if they know.

SolidSnakeMat
11-25-2010, 06:25 AM
Dude replay AC1 and accutally listen to all the cut scene and all the dialogue it makes more sense. You'll understand the tenants better and "Nothing is true, Everything is permitted" Has way more meaning than you are saying.

dreamofmirrors7
11-25-2010, 06:34 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by SolidSnakeMat:
Dude replay AC1 and accutally listen to all the cut scene and all the dialogue it makes more sense. You'll understand the tenants better and "Nothing is true, Everything is permitted" Has way more meaning than you are saying. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Such as what? Explain a little more.

persiateddy95
11-25-2010, 06:39 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">It's a self defeating statement.

If nothing is true and everything is permitted, then everything being permitted and nothing being true is false, because nothing is true. It then becomes rhetorical and circular.

If everything is true then nothing is permitted.

However, I personally tend to lean more towards an ethical understanding of "nothing is true", meaning that nothing anyone says about how we should be or should act is true and that everything we could ever think of doing within the realm of actual possibility in this physical reality is permitted to happen, and so it does.
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Source: http://answers.yahoo.com/quest...0090908041911AAYS8eV (http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090908041911AAYS8eV)

dreamofmirrors7
11-25-2010, 06:44 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by persiateddy95:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">It's a self defeating statement.

If nothing is true and everything is permitted, then everything being permitted and nothing being true is false, because nothing is true. It then becomes rhetorical and circular.

If everything is true then nothing is permitted.

However, I personally tend to lean more towards an ethical understanding of "nothing is true", meaning that nothing anyone says about how we should be or should act is true and that everything we could ever think of doing within the realm of actual possibility in this physical reality is permitted to happen, and so it does.
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Source: http://answers.yahoo.com/quest...0090908041911AAYS8eV (http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090908041911AAYS8eV) </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I guess that's what I was getting at. Since it's such a self defeating idea, why do think the Assassins continue to follow it? Or do they really? Ezio was never too discreet in his kills.

I mean, does it seem like there is a point in the storyline for this giant, ironic staple of the assassin way to play out, or is it just something to wave off as pointless detail?

The_Sphinx
11-25-2010, 07:40 AM
Ezio never was an assassin in the way the old order of the assassins were meant to be.

He becomes an assassin because he wants revenge, and more or less on accident stumbles upon the templars and their plot to take over Firenze and Venice.

Altair, however, was raised to be an assassin from birth, to fight off the templar threat and to keep the powers of the world in check.
Ezio starts up the Brotherhood not to save the world from the templars, but to save Rome from Borgia oppression. Ironically enough, all the assassin contracts for the brotherhood are actually about templars.

This is also why the overarching assassin vs. templar storyline from the first AC is totally lost on ACII and especially Brotherhood.