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woofiedog
10-05-2006, 12:51 AM
Nakajima A6M2-N RUFE

http://www.b-29s-over-korea.com/Japanese_Kamikaze/images/Nakajima-A6M2-N-Type-2-Figh.jpg
Nakajima A6m2-N Type 2 Fighter Seaplane

IJN Seaplane Tender CHITOSE Link: http://www.combinedfleet.com/chitosesp_t.htm

Japan was the only nation to produce and deliver into service float-equipped single-seat interceptor fighter seaplanes (the British Spitfire float adaptation did not progress beyond
the experimental stage). When in 1940 the Japanese navy initiated the design of a new interceptor seaplane (the Kawanishi N1K1 Kyofu, or 'Rex'), the need was also expressed for a stopgap aircraft and the Nakajima company was instructed in February 1941 to develop a float-equipped version of the excellent Mitsubishi A6M2 Zero naval interceptor. As evidence of Japan's long-standing plans for territorial expansion through the Pacific, it had been recognized that in the inevitable 'island-hopping' war there would be few ready-made air bases from which to provide air cover during the occupation of the smaller islands, and that the construction of runways would be impractical. Although equipped with almost a dozen aircraft-carriers, the Japanese would be unable to use them in support of every single island invasion.

After removing the wheel landing gear and fairing over the wheel wells of a standard A6M2, Nakajima mounted a large float under the fuselage by means of a forward-raked central pylon and a pair of V-struts below the cockpit; two cantilever stabilizing floats were also mounted under the wings. The standard Zero gun armament was retained, and the first prototype was flown on 7 December 1941, the day on which the Japanese navy attacked Pearl Harbor.

Entering production as the Nakajima A6M2-N and codenamed 'Rufe' by the Allies, the new fighter still displayed a creditable performance, being first issued to the Yokohama Kokutai and deployed to Tulagi in the Solomons where the Japanese had first landed during the Battle of the Coral Sea. However, almost all the 'Rufes' were destroyed in a strike on the seaplane base by 15 Grumman F4Fs from USS Wasp on 7 August 1942. Better success attended the 'Rufes' which fought in the later Aleutian campaign, but losses soared as soon as American fighter strength could be built up. During the final year of the war, when American heavy bombers and naval aircraft opened their great attacks on the Japanese homeland, 'Rufes' of the Otsu Kokutai, based on Lake Biwa, were thrown into the battle as interceptors in defence of Central Honshu but suffered very heavy losses. Total production of 'Rufe' amounted to 327 before being halted in September 1943.

http://www.enter.net/~rocketeer/zfloatdrwng.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/ff/A6M2-N_Pilots.jpg
Japanese fighter pilots. At the plane anchorage in the background can bee seen two Nakajima A6M2-N Type 2 Fighter Model 11 sea-planes. These float plane versions of the "Zero" fighter had the allied reporting name "Rufe".

Units utilizing the A6M2-N as a main fighter

Yokohama Air Group
Toko Air Group
Otsu Air Group
Yokosuka Air Group (technical evaluation unit)
11th Air Fleet
5th Air Fleet
36th Air Fleet
452nd Air Fleet
934th Air Fleet

General characteristics
Length: 10.10 m
Wing Span: 22.44 m
Height: 4.30 m
Fully loaded weight: 2,880 kg
Empty weight: 1,912 kg
Engine: Nakajima NK1C Sakae 12 (940 hp (690 kW) for takeoff, 950 hp (700 kW) at 4,200 meters)

Performance
Cruise Speed: 295 km/h
Max Speed at 5,000 m: 435 km/h
Max Range: 1,780 km
Time: 500 m, 6 min 43 s
Service Ceiling : 10,000 m

Armament
Type 97 7.7 mm machine gun Ӕ2
Type 99 20 mm cannons Ӕ2
60 kg bomb Ӕ2
Type n3 phosphor air-to-air canister bomb Ӕ2

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/34/A6M2-N_anchorage.jpg
Nakajima A6M2-N "Rufe" floatplanes at anchorage.

http://frenchnavy.free.fr/seaplanes/rufe/images/rufe-001.JPG
In February 1941, the Japanese company Nakajima started studying a new embarked seaplane derived from the fuselage of the A6M2 Model 11 (Zero). Motorized by a Nakajima NK1C Skae 32 engine of 940 hp. It was commissioned in 1942. The Rufe was used over the Pacific Ocean for reconnaissance and training misions. The French Navy example was found at Singapour in September 1945, by British troops. After evaluation by the "ATAIU", it was delivered in March 1946 at Biªn Hoa, close to Sa¯gon. It was affected to the 8S squadron, until it crashed on September 19th 1946 at Rach Ba Sang close to the AORL Jules Verne. A total of 327 A6M2-Ns had been built at Koizumi by Nakjima Hikoki K. K. between December 1941 and September 1943.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/0b/A6M2-N_Rufe_burned_after_the_war.jpg
Japanese aircraft being incinerated by a flame thrower near Sasebo, Japan, in December 1945. Sitting on the top of the pile is an A6M2-N "Rufe". The Allies were scared of a revolt by the Japanese and, as a result, destroyed most of Japan's aircraft that had survived the war.

Links:
http://www.tighar.org/Projects/Devastator/surveyjapanese.htm
http://www.tighar.org/Projects/Devastator/surveyjapanese.htm#MIJLLA001a
http://avia.russian.ee/air/japan/a_nakajima.html
http://www.combinedfleet.com/ijna/ijnaf_a.htm

woofiedog
10-05-2006, 12:51 AM
Nakajima A6M2-N RUFE

http://www.b-29s-over-korea.com/Japanese_Kamikaze/images/Nakajima-A6M2-N-Type-2-Figh.jpg
Nakajima A6m2-N Type 2 Fighter Seaplane

IJN Seaplane Tender CHITOSE Link: http://www.combinedfleet.com/chitosesp_t.htm

Japan was the only nation to produce and deliver into service float-equipped single-seat interceptor fighter seaplanes (the British Spitfire float adaptation did not progress beyond
the experimental stage). When in 1940 the Japanese navy initiated the design of a new interceptor seaplane (the Kawanishi N1K1 Kyofu, or 'Rex'), the need was also expressed for a stopgap aircraft and the Nakajima company was instructed in February 1941 to develop a float-equipped version of the excellent Mitsubishi A6M2 Zero naval interceptor. As evidence of Japan's long-standing plans for territorial expansion through the Pacific, it had been recognized that in the inevitable 'island-hopping' war there would be few ready-made air bases from which to provide air cover during the occupation of the smaller islands, and that the construction of runways would be impractical. Although equipped with almost a dozen aircraft-carriers, the Japanese would be unable to use them in support of every single island invasion.

After removing the wheel landing gear and fairing over the wheel wells of a standard A6M2, Nakajima mounted a large float under the fuselage by means of a forward-raked central pylon and a pair of V-struts below the cockpit; two cantilever stabilizing floats were also mounted under the wings. The standard Zero gun armament was retained, and the first prototype was flown on 7 December 1941, the day on which the Japanese navy attacked Pearl Harbor.

Entering production as the Nakajima A6M2-N and codenamed 'Rufe' by the Allies, the new fighter still displayed a creditable performance, being first issued to the Yokohama Kokutai and deployed to Tulagi in the Solomons where the Japanese had first landed during the Battle of the Coral Sea. However, almost all the 'Rufes' were destroyed in a strike on the seaplane base by 15 Grumman F4Fs from USS Wasp on 7 August 1942. Better success attended the 'Rufes' which fought in the later Aleutian campaign, but losses soared as soon as American fighter strength could be built up. During the final year of the war, when American heavy bombers and naval aircraft opened their great attacks on the Japanese homeland, 'Rufes' of the Otsu Kokutai, based on Lake Biwa, were thrown into the battle as interceptors in defence of Central Honshu but suffered very heavy losses. Total production of 'Rufe' amounted to 327 before being halted in September 1943.

http://www.enter.net/~rocketeer/zfloatdrwng.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/ff/A6M2-N_Pilots.jpg
Japanese fighter pilots. At the plane anchorage in the background can bee seen two Nakajima A6M2-N Type 2 Fighter Model 11 sea-planes. These float plane versions of the "Zero" fighter had the allied reporting name "Rufe".

Units utilizing the A6M2-N as a main fighter

Yokohama Air Group
Toko Air Group
Otsu Air Group
Yokosuka Air Group (technical evaluation unit)
11th Air Fleet
5th Air Fleet
36th Air Fleet
452nd Air Fleet
934th Air Fleet

General characteristics
Length: 10.10 m
Wing Span: 22.44 m
Height: 4.30 m
Fully loaded weight: 2,880 kg
Empty weight: 1,912 kg
Engine: Nakajima NK1C Sakae 12 (940 hp (690 kW) for takeoff, 950 hp (700 kW) at 4,200 meters)

Performance
Cruise Speed: 295 km/h
Max Speed at 5,000 m: 435 km/h
Max Range: 1,780 km
Time: 500 m, 6 min 43 s
Service Ceiling : 10,000 m

Armament
Type 97 7.7 mm machine gun Ӕ2
Type 99 20 mm cannons Ӕ2
60 kg bomb Ӕ2
Type n3 phosphor air-to-air canister bomb Ӕ2

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/34/A6M2-N_anchorage.jpg
Nakajima A6M2-N "Rufe" floatplanes at anchorage.

http://frenchnavy.free.fr/seaplanes/rufe/images/rufe-001.JPG
In February 1941, the Japanese company Nakajima started studying a new embarked seaplane derived from the fuselage of the A6M2 Model 11 (Zero). Motorized by a Nakajima NK1C Skae 32 engine of 940 hp. It was commissioned in 1942. The Rufe was used over the Pacific Ocean for reconnaissance and training misions. The French Navy example was found at Singapour in September 1945, by British troops. After evaluation by the "ATAIU", it was delivered in March 1946 at Biªn Hoa, close to Sa¯gon. It was affected to the 8S squadron, until it crashed on September 19th 1946 at Rach Ba Sang close to the AORL Jules Verne. A total of 327 A6M2-Ns had been built at Koizumi by Nakjima Hikoki K. K. between December 1941 and September 1943.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/0b/A6M2-N_Rufe_burned_after_the_war.jpg
Japanese aircraft being incinerated by a flame thrower near Sasebo, Japan, in December 1945. Sitting on the top of the pile is an A6M2-N "Rufe". The Allies were scared of a revolt by the Japanese and, as a result, destroyed most of Japan's aircraft that had survived the war.

Links:
http://www.tighar.org/Projects/Devastator/surveyjapanese.htm
http://www.tighar.org/Projects/Devastator/surveyjapanese.htm#MIJLLA001a
http://avia.russian.ee/air/japan/a_nakajima.html
http://www.combinedfleet.com/ijna/ijnaf_a.htm

Siwarrior
10-05-2006, 12:56 AM
Thanks for posting good read http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

F19_Ob
10-05-2006, 03:23 AM
Thank you. Very interesting.

Quick important info. Wish we had more of these posts. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Low_Flyer_MkVb
10-05-2006, 05:53 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/agreepost.gif

LEBillfish
10-05-2006, 06:53 AM
Good Stuff http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

-HH- Beebop
10-05-2006, 07:18 AM
As always, excellent research and posts can be expected from you.
This is no exception.
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Haigotron
10-05-2006, 08:30 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">The Allies were scared of a revolt by the Japanese and, as a result, destroyed most of Japan's aircraft that had survived the war. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Excellent read about a unique plane, thnx...but tragic end for all those warbirds

LEBillfish
10-05-2006, 08:38 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Type n3 phosphor air-to-air canister bomb Ӕ2 </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

This is one option and its varients I'd really like to see in the sim.....It's surprising how often they're mentioned but overlooked, yet they were used quite a bot on all aircraft, even mounted in high palm tree's in NewGuinea as the strafers ran so low.

woofiedog
10-05-2006, 11:01 PM
Thank's http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

A decent write up on the Ki-43...


It's a reminder not to dismiss the Ki-43 c.1942 as a completely inferior
fighter since it could best a fighter that could best the vaunted 109. But by
the latter half of 1943 in Guinea, the Oscar was increasingly encountering the
P-38 and P-47, airplanes whose pilots did not dogfight but floated high in the
sky like hawks looking for pigeons, swooped, struck and rose to the heights
again. Against these opponents, the best the Ki-43 could do was dodge. But if
the Lockheed or Republic pilot ever abandoned those tactics, the Oscar would
fix its teeth in him like an enraged terrier. It was always a bad idea to be
low on altitude, airspeed and ideas when in the presence of a Ki-43.

The Ki-43 was, in some ways, more dangerous to deal with than the A6M, chiefly
because it had a better rate of roll and was armed with two 12.7mm machineguns.
The P-40 driver with a Zero on his tail could usually break the contact with
an aileron roll. This was much less likely with the Ki-43. The Oscar boy
could plant himself behind the P-40 and stay there no matter what the Curtiss
driver did, all the while hammering .50 cal nails that could do some real
damage.
In contrast, the Zero pilot, even if he couldn't be shaken, was doing most of
his firing with rifle caliber mgs which did less damage (although enough of
them in the right places could do the job). The 20mms generally didn't come
into play unless the Zero was in point blank range. A way to stay out of
point blank range was to execute a series of violent aileron turns; this would
allow the P-40 pilot to gradually pull away from the Zero. Once he had
extended sufficiently, he could go into a fast, shallow climb and leave the
Zero behind.
The best bet for the P-40 driver was to have sufficient altitude to dive away
from either the Oscar or Zero, but that wasn't always the situation.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/c3/Nakajima_Ki-43-IIa.jpg

Link: http://www.warbirdforum.com/rdunn43.htm

woofiedog
10-05-2006, 11:13 PM
Japanese Aircraft used by the French

This section is based on information from an article in the French Magazine "Le Fana d'Aviation" by M. Pelletier. I am indebted to M. Cyril Defever for translating and providing me with this information.

Soon after the close of the Second World War, French forces in Indochina found themselves with out air support. Pending the arrival of aircraft transferred from France, and ex-British Spitfires, attempts were made to press into a service a number of war-weary Japanese aircraft. Although there were numerous Japanese airstrips located throughout Indochina, only a handful of serviceable front-line modern aircraft were located. For the most part, these aircraft performed second-line duties with the French, as transports and liason aircraft. The notable exceptions were the Nakajima Ki.43 Oscars, which formed the backbone of two fighter squadrons until their replacment with Spitfires.

It appears many of the aircraft were in relatively poor condition, and in the unfamiliar hands of French pilots the attrition rate was high, with at least two aircraft being lost during their only flights! Though most aircraft lasted only until 1946, it is likely that a few soldiered on in French hands until 1949.

Table 1 presents a summary of the aircraft used. Where the serials or aircraft numbers are known, they are given. Details on the Ki.43s are given in tables 2 and 3.

Note that the stated serials 8.S.1 through 8.S.4 for the Aichi Jakes do not appear to agree with at least one published photo. This photo, albeit somewhat unclear, appears to show a serial of 8.S.13. Note that this photo also shows the lighter coloured area on which the serial is painted. The instructions for Carpena's Indochine 1er Partie sheet suggest grey for this panel, but I figure a more dull green than the base colour of the fuselage might be appropriate.

Also from other site...

After WWII, Oscars (MkIII machines wore French colors in the Saigon area as counter-insurgency aircraft used for a short while against the Viet Minh until replacement by Spitfires. The French had difficulty landing them due to lack of proper familiarization and several were wrecked. This was said to have amused the Japanese immensely as they considered it a piece of cake to handle in the air or on the ground. In China, Central Government Forces (KMT) had several Oscars but used them little due to the availability of fresh P-51 and other superior aircraft from the USA and Britain. But the Communist forces, known before 1949 as the Chinese Democratic Alliance Forces, had liberated a wing of late model Hayabusas at Shenyang, Liaoning Province in their occupation of the Northeast in 1945-47. Their air force experience began at that time under the guidance of a captured Major Kobayashi who set up a training school for pilots and technicians that became the Red forces' first aeronautical insitute. They also received some of the assets of Manpi, Manchukoku Air Industries, and Japanese-built Jungmann trainers, which Soviet forces left for them. When the Chinese Civil War ignited in 1947 Kobayashi's personnel and the new Red Chinese Air Unit, mostly Oscars and Franks, saw some action and were almost used in the big push to cross the Yangzi River that finally defeated the the Nanjing Central Government of Generalissimo Jiang Zhongzheng on the mainland. On October 1st, 1949, Major Kobayashi himself, in an Oscar with the PLA star and bar 8-1 insignia, himself flew the aerobatic display over Tiananmen Square as Mao Zedong proclaimed the birth of the Peoples Republic of China. An ironic footnote to the 8 year war waged by the Japanese to rid China of both Bolshevism and Jiang's independant (of Japan that is), neoclassical Chinese nationalism. In another case of demobilized Japanese aiding leftist guerillas, Oscars were also used in the Malaysian insurgency under supervision of Japanese soldiers and airmen who basically continued their war by siding with rebels against the return of British rule. And the Royal Thai Air Force used them well into the 1950s I have heard but I have to check this out.

Link for list of aircraft:
http://hedgehoghollow.com/awoic/japan.html
http://www.j-aircraft.com/research/jinforeign.htm


A bit more reading and other aircraft links:
http://www.xs4all.nl/~fbonne/warbirds/ww2htmls/nakaki43.html (http://www.xs4all.nl/%7Efbonne/warbirds/ww2htmls/nakaki43.html)
http://worldatwar.net/chandelle/v3/v3n1/frcoin.html

http://worldatwar.net/chandelle/v3/v3n1/aichi_e13.gif

http://worldatwar.net/chandelle/v3/v3n1/ki43French.gif

http://worldatwar.net/chandelle/v3/v3n1/p63Indo.gif

JG53Frankyboy
10-05-2006, 11:37 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by woofiedog:
Nakajima A6M2-N RUFE


After removing the wheel landing gear and fairing over the wheel wells of a standard A6M2, Nakajima mounted a large float under the fuselage by means of a forward-raked central pylon and a pair of V-struts below the cockpit; two cantilever stabilizing floats were also mounted under the wings. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

because it could not use the normaly mounted drop tank - an additional fuel tank was installed within the float itself.

woofiedog
10-05-2006, 11:39 PM
A quick note... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

There is a Japanese war flick called Kato hayabusa sento-tai, made in 1944 that is based about a Squadron of Ki-43's... and there is a list of aircraft [see below]. I'm not sure if these are really in the film [if they are, they might be captured from the early campiagns]... but it would be Very interesting to see anyway.

War-time Japan produced a number of excellent motion pictures regarding its military. One of those films, a product of the Toho Motion Picture Company, was the 1944 production of 'Kato Hayabusa Sentotai' (Kato's Perigrin Falcon Squadron). Col. Kato was indeed a real officer serving with the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force in Southeast Asia...an officer highly respected by his pilots for his fairness and excellent flying ability. The aircraft he and his men flew was the Nakajima Ki-43 'Hayabusa' fighter. One of the many highlights of the production was the use of the actual type aircraft used by the Kato squadron. Along with the realistic action, the acting and direction were superb. I would say that this feature is above par should it be compared with other films of this type including those produced in the United States and Europe. The motion picture was shot in black and white, and is about two hours in length.

AIRCRAFT: Brewster Buffalo, P-40, Lockheed Hudson, Mitsubishi Ki.21 type 97, Nakajimas Ki.27b, Ki.34 type 97, and Ki.43 I/II.

Links:
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0036980
http://aerofiles.com/film-k.html

woofiedog
10-06-2006, 06:36 AM
JG53Frankyboy... Thank's for the info.

And again Thank's everyone for all the reply's.

general_kalle
10-06-2006, 08:07 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">The Allies were scared of a revolt by the Japanese and, as a result, destroyed most of Japan's aircraft that had survived the war. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

what a shame. the same happened to most german warships and tanks.

its a shame cos it would be cool if we had much more ww2 stuff on the museums

imagine if they hadnt used prinz Eugen as a A bomb test target!!!

woofiedog
10-06-2006, 11:51 AM
general_kalle... There is some history from the German Navy still around, unless they have demolished such sites since...

http://www.scharnhorst-class.dk/gneisenau/gallery/pictures/gallgneiseseatrials2/gallgneiseseatrials21.jpg
The modified Gneisenau is shown during her sea trials. She has now been refitted with the "Atlantic" stem and the raised diagonally cut funnel cap.

Battery Fjell - Norway

The Guns of the Gneisenau

http://www.scharnhorst-class.dk/gneisenau/gneisenauguns/pictures/battery_fjell/battery_fjell03.jpg

Battery ˜rland - Norway
This was originally the C turret on the Gneisenau

http://www.scharnhorst-class.dk/gneisenau/gneisenauguns/pictures/battery_orland/battery_orland02.jpg

http://www.scharnhorst-class.dk/gneisenau/gneisenauguns/pictures/battery_orland/battery_orland04.jpg

http://www.scharnhorst-class.dk/gneisenau/gneisenauguns/pictures/battery_orland/battery_orland06.jpg

Battery Tirpitz - Denmark
This 38 cm turret was originally planned to be used for the Gneisenau

http://www.scharnhorst-class.dk/gneisenau/gneisenauguns/pictures/battery_tirpitz/battery_tirpitz06.jpg

http://www.scharnhorst-class.dk/gneisenau/gneisenauguns/pictures/battery_tirpitz/battery_tirpitz08.jpg

http://www.scharnhorst-class.dk/gneisenau/gneisenauguns/pictures/battery_tirpitz/battery_tirpitz11.jpg

Stevnsfort - Denmark
These turrets originates from the Gneisenau

http://www.scharnhorst-class.dk/gneisenau/gneisenauguns/pictures/fortress_stevnsfort/fortress_stevnsfort13.jpg
Marked P1 & P2

http://www.scharnhorst-class.dk/gneisenau/gneisenauguns/pictures/fortress_stevnsfort/fortress_stevnsfort05.jpg

http://www.scharnhorst-class.dk/gneisenau/gneisenauguns/pictures/fortress_stevnsfort/fortress_stevnsfort11.jpg

zbw_109
10-06-2006, 07:24 PM
.