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View Full Version : If hit, does lower engine settings matter?



Afromike1
05-25-2009, 10:39 AM
If im hit, I want to decrease the chances that my engine will catch on fire. Usually when I return home with a fuel tank leak, I catch on fire right before I make it back to base.

My question is, if I lower my engine settings does it become less likely that my plane will catch on fire?

Afromike1
05-25-2009, 10:39 AM
If im hit, I want to decrease the chances that my engine will catch on fire. Usually when I return home with a fuel tank leak, I catch on fire right before I make it back to base.

My question is, if I lower my engine settings does it become less likely that my plane will catch on fire?

na85
05-25-2009, 10:55 AM
Not if your fuel tank is on fire.

If it's an engine fire, then maybe.

Bearcat99
05-25-2009, 11:13 AM
I think so.. I have managed to make it across enemy lines to friendly territory by lowering my throttle.. reducing pitch and opening my rads....

DKoor
05-25-2009, 11:20 AM
Hurricane and P-51 (to name a few) have this damage of overreving the engine after being hit. It can be avoided by lowering throttle and aircraft can still fly.

JtD
05-25-2009, 11:52 AM
As far as I know there is very little you can do about fires. Some planes burn and explode easily, others don't, for whichever reason. Your engine settings do not matter. In real life, you'd shut off fuel flow to the engine so there'd be less to burn. This doesn't work in game to my knowledge. Reducing power would reduce the size of the fire, but not necessarily the chances of catching fire. In game it has no effect to my knowledge.
Only thing that works in game is to fly fast, so the airflow can blow out the fire. This does work in real life, too, but not simple as in the game.

Jaws2002
05-25-2009, 12:04 PM
From my experience if your plane is burning staying fast keeps you alive longer.
After you put the flame out the first time, you can run for a long time in some planes if you keep your speed up. That's why we usually blow up when we slow down for landing.

K_Freddie
05-25-2009, 01:11 PM
There's a post on a North Africa combat somewhere, where the spit pilot saw his comrade hit and had sprung fuel leaks...
His comments were that 'once you had a fuel leak an explosion was imminent', and sure enough that other spit blew up a few seconds later. His description about the parts that flew past his cpit was quiet graphic - this was at lower altitudes.

And as mentioned, at higher alts diving or going with speed helps, but once at lower alts I'm sure an explosion 'is imminent'.
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

x6BL_Brando
05-25-2009, 01:40 PM
I recall that back in the Sixties (and probably earlier) some of the bikes we had were quite prone to carburettor fires on being kicked over - usually due to high-lift cams and advance-****** settings (manually set back then) causing flames to spit back through the inlet valves and ignite the fuel in the carburettor. It was quite freaky sitting on a 650 with flames coming up around your parts, and one of the best reasons for wearing leather jeans I ever found!

The best solution was to keep on with the kick-starting until the engine started, at which point the burning fuel would be drawn back into the carburettor and on into the combustion chamber where it belonged. This maybe the case with aero engines too. Something also tells me that closing the radiator vents would be more sensible than opening them, as the more oxygen that gets in the greater the chance of combustion in the area around the engine.

B

RPMcMurphy
05-25-2009, 01:45 PM
Just don't do what I did once durring a fire; I forgot that I had changed my key commands around and then back and that 'F' meant Fold Wings instead of Fire Extinguisher. My fire went out alright. Thats after my Corsair's wings folded and I disentigrated into the Pacific. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif

Afromike1
05-26-2009, 09:02 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by RPMcMurphy:
Just don't do what I did once durring a fire; I forgot that I had changed my key commands around and then back and that 'F' meant Fold Wings instead of Fire Extinguisher. My fire went out alright. Thats after my Corsair's wings folded and I disentigrated into the Pacific. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Theres a fire extinguisher in the game? Can I use it any time and will it be effective?

JtD
05-26-2009, 09:41 AM
Some planes have fire extinguishers, and they are very effective.

RPMcMurphy
05-26-2009, 12:39 PM
Yeah, some planes have fire extinguishers that put out engine fires but you will still be in deep crap with an efftup engine situation.

crucislancer
05-26-2009, 02:54 PM
I recall nursing a P-38 back to base that had a fire in the right engine, I would just dive to put it out and then make a steady climb back up.

I've had a few instances where the engine would catch fire and my plane would blow up seconds after, I think in the P-40 and Tempest.

Fire extuinguishers are only on certain bombers, IIRC.

Choctaw111
05-26-2009, 03:36 PM
If my engine is hit and leaking oil, situation permitting (not in a dogfight) I will drop the power down to 50 and prop pitch to 50 and I have found that my engine will last much longer this way.

WTE_Galway
05-26-2009, 10:18 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by x6BL_Brando:
I recall that back in the Sixties (and probably earlier) some of the bikes we had were quite prone to carburettor fires on being kicked over - usually due to high-lift cams and advance-****** settings (manually set back then) causing flames to spit back through the inlet valves and ignite the fuel in the carburettor. It was quite freaky sitting on a 650 with flames coming up around your parts, and one of the best reasons for wearing leather jeans I ever found!

The best solution was to keep on with the kick-starting until the engine started, at which point the burning fuel would be drawn back into the carburettor and on into the combustion chamber where it belonged. This maybe the case with aero engines too. Something also tells me that closing the radiator vents would be more sensible than opening them, as the more oxygen that gets in the greater the chance of combustion in the area around the engine.

B </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It was indeed a common problem with aircraft especially if you started over-riched or pumped the primer too many times depending on the engine ... and the solution was, as you say, keep the engine running.

Heres a pic of what happens if you try and start a Spit with the settings too rich ...

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y101/clannagh/Spitfire.jpg

PanzerAce
05-27-2009, 01:50 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by WTE_Galway:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by x6BL_Brando:
I recall that back in the Sixties (and probably earlier) some of the bikes we had were quite prone to carburettor fires on being kicked over - usually due to high-lift cams and advance-****** settings (manually set back then) causing flames to spit back through the inlet valves and ignite the fuel in the carburettor. It was quite freaky sitting on a 650 with flames coming up around your parts, and one of the best reasons for wearing leather jeans I ever found!

The best solution was to keep on with the kick-starting until the engine started, at which point the burning fuel would be drawn back into the carburettor and on into the combustion chamber where it belonged. This maybe the case with aero engines too. Something also tells me that closing the radiator vents would be more sensible than opening them, as the more oxygen that gets in the greater the chance of combustion in the area around the engine.

B </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It was indeed a common problem with aircraft especially if you started over-riched or pumped the primer too many times depending on the engine ... and the solution was, as you say, keep the engine running.

Heres a pic of what happens if you try and start a Spit with the settings too rich ...

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y101/clannagh/Spitfire.jpg </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

That always actually looked like a combination of full rich for startup (normal), combined with bad plugs or magnetos, which let the engine spin up too much before actually managing to fire anything, so that there is a nice cloud of fuel vapor in exhaust, and probably on the pipes as well.


But as everyone has said. Wild cams + way advanced timing = back firing. Only solution is keep cranking her http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

doogerie
05-27-2009, 04:23 PM
with fuel leeks you know how you can loose a lot of fule is there any way to you know lose less so you can make it back to the carrier or airfield befor your power cut's out?

RPMcMurphy
05-27-2009, 04:31 PM
But as everyone has said. Wild cams + way advanced timing = back firing. Only solution is keep cranking her http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/QUOTE]
Yeah, that Spit was probably okay after that other that some scorched paint and an irritated crew chief.

crucislancer
05-27-2009, 04:54 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by doogerie:
with fuel leeks you know how you can loose a lot of fule is there any way to you know lose less so you can make it back to the carrier or airfield befor your power cut's out? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

That depends on where you are, and how bad the leak is. If you have a long journey back to base, the best thing to do is start back as soon as you are able, and keep an eye on your fuel gauge if you have one. Try to gain some altitude and keep your throttle as low as possible.

I had one last night flying the Tempest offline, I got some fuel leaks but didn't have time to check due to being quite pressed at the time. Once I finally got freed up, I found that my main tank had 20 gallons left, and the needle was going down pretty fast. I still had my wing and nose tanks left, I couldn't be sure how long they would last, so I assumed the worst and pointed for home. I was out of fuel by the time I got back to base. Having lots of altitude and sufficent airspeed really helped get me back in one piece.