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MB_Avro_UK
10-08-2007, 04:20 PM
Hi all,

This maybe an OT post or maybe not...

At the old age of 19 I flew solo in a Cessna 150. I remember it to this day. I had 9 hours under my belt. Spread over 3 months because the weather in England was so bad and I had sooo litle money http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif.

It was a cold and overcast November day..

The instructor said to me 'Use your noddle and you won't kill yourself', as he stepped out of the aircraft http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif.

As I taxiied back to the grass runway for take off on my own I tried not to look at the empty seat next to me...

I lined up and opened the throttle.I was on my own and this was it.

But when I was airborne I was still thinking about the empty seat next to me. And that I was on my own. I was the only guy who could bring this crate back and that many were watching me.

I remember the downwind leg being fast. As I turned onto finals I was very aware of keeping the airspeed up and the nose slightly down...didn't want to embarrass myself by entering a spin and killing myself...

I was a bit too fast on finals and touched down about half way down the runway..better too fast than sorry?

The landing was amazingly smooth (well, it was to me anyway...).

Nothing else equals that feeling. Well, maybe something else but that would be big-time OT.. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Best Regards,
MB_Avro.

MB_Avro_UK
10-08-2007, 04:20 PM
Hi all,

This maybe an OT post or maybe not...

At the old age of 19 I flew solo in a Cessna 150. I remember it to this day. I had 9 hours under my belt. Spread over 3 months because the weather in England was so bad and I had sooo litle money http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif.

It was a cold and overcast November day..

The instructor said to me 'Use your noddle and you won't kill yourself', as he stepped out of the aircraft http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif.

As I taxiied back to the grass runway for take off on my own I tried not to look at the empty seat next to me...

I lined up and opened the throttle.I was on my own and this was it.

But when I was airborne I was still thinking about the empty seat next to me. And that I was on my own. I was the only guy who could bring this crate back and that many were watching me.

I remember the downwind leg being fast. As I turned onto finals I was very aware of keeping the airspeed up and the nose slightly down...didn't want to embarrass myself by entering a spin and killing myself...

I was a bit too fast on finals and touched down about half way down the runway..better too fast than sorry?

The landing was amazingly smooth (well, it was to me anyway...).

Nothing else equals that feeling. Well, maybe something else but that would be big-time OT.. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Best Regards,
MB_Avro.

Jediteo
10-08-2007, 04:24 PM
Ive always wanted to fly, I'm 18 and halfway through my drivers training. How expensive is it to learn to fly?. My dad started flying a few years ago, but he had a brain haemorrhage so he had to stop halfway through the training.

Tbag_13
10-08-2007, 05:05 PM
I did my first solo this year Avro. I had 13 hours (spread over six month due to the Leeds weather) under my belt and it was a fine day. The instructor flew four circuits with me that day before sending me solo - all four landings were quiet bumpy and I was a little embarrassed. But for my instructor the landings were ok so he sent me on my first solo. He asked me if it is fine with me and I said yes. So off I went and to be honest - I was not nervous at all. There was no crosswind and all that could happen (ignoring the possibility of an emergency) was another bumpy landing. But the landing was one of the smoothest I ever did. When I told it to my instructor after the landing he just smiled and said: "It's funny that all students improve once I leave the cockpit". But that's how it was - honestly!

My navigation solo will come soon http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif.

danjama
10-08-2007, 05:20 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Jediteo:
Ive always wanted to fly, I'm 18 and halfway through my drivers training. How expensive is it to learn to fly?. My dad started flying a few years ago, but he had a brain haemorrhage so he had to stop halfway through the training. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

did ur dad survive the brain hemmorhage?

blairgowrie
10-08-2007, 05:21 PM
I had a similar experience to you MB_Avro_UK. I had a lesson one very cold day in a Canadian winter and after an hour, my instructor told me I was flying very badly. I had a coffee and then asked if there was another instructor and aircraft available. My regular instructor was booked solid for the day. I was lucky to find another instructor and aircraft RNV Cessna 150.

As we walked out to the aircraft, he asked me what I had been doing lately. Touch and Go's I replied. Then he asked me how many hours I had. Before I could reply he said "around 14?" "About that I said" not thinking. I actually had only 7 hours.

We did a couple of touch and go's then he asked me to land and come to a full stop. While taxing back to the parking area, he asked me "How are you feeling this morning?" "Great" I said getting an uneasy feeling in the pit of my stomach. "Think you can handle it yourself?" said the instructor. Figuring it was too late to back out, I said "sure".

"Do one circuit then land and join me for a coffee" said Fred.

I had identical feelings to you MB. I can remember the empty seat next to me and as I sat on the runway awaiting take-off clearance, I can recall thinking there was still time to back down. But I was cleared for take-off and as I pushed the throttle to full power, I knew there was no turning back and the only person who could get me down was me.

The circuit was fine but on final approach, me knees started to shake violently. I was not sure whether it was from fear or the bitter cold. maybe a combination of both. The landing was nothing to write home about. I believe there was at least one bounce but I was finally down. I had a quick coffee with Fred who sent me back up to do a few more touch and go's by myself.

I hung around the airport for quite a while until I got a chance to speak to my regular instructor and let him know I had just gone solo.

mortoma
10-08-2007, 05:52 PM
My first solo was in a C-152. I wanted to go up in the C-172 or the old trusty Cherokee 180 but neither were available so I rented that thing for my solo. I was used to flying the other two and could fly them better, so I was not happy about the 152 thing. My first solo flight took place at OKK, otherwise known as Kokomo municipal airport, which is in Indiana. It was about July, IIRC. Could find out if I wanted to dig up my logbook.

Well anyway, I went up and flew a pattern while my instructor was in contact with a HT portable.
I took off, flew the pattern, and everything was fine but as I got down to touch down I had forgotten how to flare the 152, which a harder flare than the 172 and if done correctly, the 152 ends up very nose high compared to 172.
For some reason I leveled off before tough down with my wheels about 4 feet off the gorund, instead of the desired two feet or so. Needless to say I stalled to the terra firma quite firmly and harshly. Otherwise a good first solo!!

Woof603
10-08-2007, 06:22 PM
First solo in an F86, climbing out, cleaning up the airplane, trying to keep the blue side up, and Whoosh! the F86 taking off behind me, also on first solo, barrel rolled around me. I guess you could call it real fighter pilot aggression. Needless to say, I still remember his name. With admiration.

Kettenhunde
10-08-2007, 06:29 PM
First Solo in a DA20. I can remember the empty seat as well as the excitement and anticipation of my first time flying with nobody there to bail me out.

I solo'd at a Class C airport. I reached the stop line for the active and carefully started going thru the checklist. It seemed like I had just started when over the radio comes, "Bluestreak, runway 4 ready for take-off". I never noticed the 90 passenger jet parked 10 feet off my tail. At that moment, that jet made a C-5 Galaxy look like a C-152. I had just started my run up checklist and this guy was finished, too. To say I felt small and inexperienced is putting it lightly.

Well I finished the checklist carefully, turned around a gave a sheepish wave to Bluestreak, got my clearence and took off. Ended up with an almost flawless solo.

I say almost flawless because now that I am an aircraft owner, my landings became much better when I have to buy the tires and the brake pads!

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

All the best,

Crumpp

PBNA-Boosher
10-08-2007, 06:36 PM
I piloted Piper Cherokees during my flight training and soloed after 20 something hours. It wasn't scary, but it was very exciting. I went out around the reservior and flew for about an hour, no problems, and then I brought it down for a good landing if I say so myself. It was an uncontrolled airport, so a little less order going around that day, but I'll never forget it. It was absolutely wonderful.

leitmotiv
10-08-2007, 06:57 PM
I was a bombardier. Flew two missions in 1969. Saturation raids. I was hanging by a lapstrap as my pal banked over the high school we were playing for homecoming. I lobbed toilet paper rolls rapid fire out the open door of the little Cessna. I was terrified as I stared straight down at the ground. Then we did the same over our own high school. The flak was so thick you could walk on it.

strider1
10-08-2007, 07:41 PM
Similar experience, a few touch and goes, then my instructor had me full stop and taxi to line up for another take-off. He simply opened the door of the Cessna 150, stepped out and said "You're ready.". I had 9 hours under my belt. Uncontrolled airport and no other traffic.
Life-long memory, enjoyed every second of it. Wonderful feeling of freedom and wanting to go exploring but flew a standard pattern. I remember my eyes flying around the panel and on the ever-closer ground with a feeling of confidence but saw a flash of a newspaper headline about my fiery crash. Well, that got me concentrated even more and had an uneventful touchdown, probably better than the next few subsequent.
Leonardo was right.
Cheers!
Strider1

Jungmann
10-08-2007, 07:48 PM
I'd had about four hours dual, checking out in my Jungmann. Bob Bowersox, the Continental pilot and my hangar mate, kept shaking his head when I'd wobble my way down to a landing. Finally, he said, "This is boring, and he threw his straps off and got out of the front cockpit. "You work on it for a while by yourself." It took a second before I realized he meant solo.

I taxied down to the ramp, checked the traffic, and shoved in the power. I was surprised how much faster it accelerated, and turning crosswind, how much less ailreon it took. I nursed it around the pattern. The Jungmann has this spindly landing gear, struts about as thick as spaghetti strands. That's on purpose--the Luftwaffe preferred their primary students wash out the landing gear on the Jungmann on a hard landing rather than drive the gear up into the fuselage--a harder and more expensive repair--so the gear was weak on purpose. Bowersox and I had already busted a strut once with a hard landing--we ground looped, dragged a tip, but with a fabric patch and a weld, the plane was good to go in a few days.

So I nursed that puppy onto final holding about 1300 rpm and let it settle slowly. Didn't have much runway--this was Santa Paula, maybe 1300 feet. I felt the mains touch, gave it some forward stick to pin the wheels, then pulled back the power. I kept the nose forward until the tail slowly stalled and it settled into three-point. Then lots of fancy footwork on the rudders to keep it from heading off towards the weeds. And I was down. Woohoo. One of the great days of my life.

mortoma
10-08-2007, 08:21 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Kettenhunde:
First Solo in a DA20. I can remember the empty seat as well as the excitement and anticipation of my first time flying with nobody there to bail me out.

I solo'd at a Class C airport. I reached the stop line for the active and carefully started going thru the checklist. It seemed like I had just started when over the radio comes, "Bluestreak, runway 4 ready for take-off". I never noticed the 90 passenger jet parked 10 feet off my tail. At that moment, that jet made a C-5 Galaxy look like a C-152. I had just started my run up checklist and this guy was finished, too. To say I felt small and inexperienced is putting it lightly.

Well I finished the checklist carefully, turned around a gave a sheepish wave to Bluestreak, got my clearence and took off. Ended up with an almost flawless solo.

I say almost flawless because now that I am an aircraft owner, my landings became much better when I have to buy the tires and the brake pads!

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

All the best,

Crumpp </div></BLOCKQUOTE>I was taught to do the runup and checklist in some out of the way spot. Many airports have just such a place somewhere. I would never do that on the taxiway, especially
with other planes behind me. I guess all instructors teach different styles.

mortoma
10-08-2007, 08:27 PM
That's right, brag about all your perfect or near perfect solo landings!! Ha Ha Ha!! Well maybe you all would have sucked as much as me if you solo'd after only 11 hours and had alreay checked out in three different aircraft!!
And then the one you have to solo in is the one you hated the most. Plus to top it off, is the one you had the least experience with!!! At least I didn't hit nose gear first....

I knew I should have cancelled my rental that day and went for the next week ( so I could get the plane I wanted ) but I was anxious to do it I guess!! Go ahead you guys, brag it up!! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

buzzsaw1939
10-08-2007, 08:32 PM
Interesting thread!....mmmmmm, being an old instructor, I'm a little confused, I never let a student solo without signing him off for solo, thats the law.

Maybe that part was not remembered in these storys, or maybe they changed the law, who knows! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

your right about the runup Mortoma.

han freak solo
10-08-2007, 09:12 PM
Cessna 152. 1985. No water. Kind of underwhelming, but fun.

More exciting was my first solo cross country. I loved going places and proving I could find my way back.

mortoma
10-08-2007, 09:33 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by buzzsaw1939:
Interesting thread!....mmmmmm, being an old instructor, I'm a little confused, I never let a student solo without signing him off for solo, thats the law.

Maybe that part was not remembered in these storys, or maybe they changed the law, who knows! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

your right about the runup Mortoma. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Yes, I think the instructor has to do some kind of sign off in your logbook, but I can't remember, it was the summer of 2000 when I took my lessons. I had a lousy first solo landing but at least I was my instructor's earliest solo ( up to that point anyway ) and I was the only student he ever allowed to fly three different aircraft. I think the Piper was the easiest to land because of it's low wings that were down in the ground effect better than high wingers. It also had much lighter controls than any Cessna I ever flew. Cherokee 180s climb like crazy too. Compared to the 172 or 152, it seemed like you were climbing straight up, even on really hot days.

mortoma
10-08-2007, 09:42 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by han freak solo:
Cessna 152. 1985. No water. Kind of underwhelming, but fun.

More exciting was my first solo cross country. I loved going places and proving I could find my way back. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>I'm curious as to what you mean by "no water"??

timholt
10-09-2007, 01:08 AM
A PA-38 VH-MHO - and I can still remember the aching face from the grin I couln't keep off my face all the way around the circuit.

buzzsaw1939
10-09-2007, 02:09 AM
Ah come on you guys...I want to here about the screw ups, I still giggle when I think of some that I've seen, I know you have some! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/10.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

OD_
10-09-2007, 03:08 AM
Flew solo when I was 17. Gliding scholarship, loved every minute of it. Vigilant motor glider, empty seat was a bit weird and really affected the aircraft...I had a particularly heavy instructor one time and flying with him was the only time the aircraft would drift right after take off!!!
With no instructor it took off in half the distance and the climb performance was much better. Unfortunately it was also a pain to land...it just didn't want to go down!!! Wasn't a bad three point landing though.

I'll never forget it.

OD.

Jediteo
10-09-2007, 03:18 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by danjama:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Jediteo:
Ive always wanted to fly, I'm 18 and halfway through my drivers training. How expensive is it to learn to fly?. My dad started flying a few years ago, but he had a brain haemorrhage so he had to stop halfway through the training. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

did ur dad survive the brain hemmorhage? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

He survived, had no permanent brain damage, the doctors diagnosed him with alzheimers, which later proved to be completely wrong. He'll try to get his drivers licensce back though, but its kinda hard for a 50+ man to do that (no offence pop)

slipBall
10-09-2007, 03:27 AM
Piper 140, I was 19 and too young and dumb to be scared.....very much a challenge and rewarding, turning the engine off is etched in my mind

nsteense
10-09-2007, 05:01 AM
I did my first solo take off (and of course landing) after about 20 hours. My instructor really had me going on the touch and go. So much that I was really anticipating my first solo. At that time, I was really confident flying solo was just piece of cake. A logical step which I had to take to go on with PPL training. Hence the relief that finally I could fly on my own (albeit under supervision from the instructor on the ground)...
But not much exitement, to be honest.
I pulled off one sweet soft text book landing, and I thought by myself that I could do that again. So the second landing was the complete opposite of the first one. It felt more like a controlled crash.... I called it a day after that.
I was more nervous for flying towards some international airports, using radiocommunication all the way. It was something different after flying from an uncontrolled airfield

Kettenhunde
10-09-2007, 05:07 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">I was taught to do the runup and checklist in some out of the way spot. Many airports have just such a place somewhere. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

So was I....Yes many airports do!

However, this one does not.

All the best,

Crumpp

JG53Frankyboy
10-09-2007, 05:19 AM
http://www.franky.fliegerhospital.de/SOLO%20Page1.jpg
http://www.franky.fliegerhospital.de/SOLO%20Page2.jpg

it was a surprise on that day , after one landing, my instructor said, roll to the side, he left the plane and said go for your own http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif
it was stunning - hard to go back to office after that ......................

RAF_OldBuzzard
10-09-2007, 07:22 AM
Mine was in a J-3 Cub. I only had 4 hrs 'oficially' in my log book, but had been flying and doing T&Gs with a friend for maybe 10-12 hrs.

What was really strange was that I could see all of the instrument panel, since the instructor always sits in the front seat.

I was a bit nervous, and totaly missed the fact the the plane lifted off MUCH sooner than with the instructor. I finally figured that out when it came time to flare for landing. Since it was so much lighter, that danged Cub just floated, and floated, and floated. I think I finally touched down about 1/3 the way down the strip. That wasn't all that big a problem as it was plenty long enough. Just a bit embarassing to miss your touchdown point by so far.

BOA_Allmenroder
10-09-2007, 07:27 AM
In the US a solo logbook endorsement by your instructor is required prior to solo. A further logbook endorsement is required when you do your solo x country.

I don't remember my first aircraft solo that occured in 1981 or so. However, I vividly remember my first solo in a helicopter (TH55-Hughes 300) that occured in Army Flight School in 1983.

blairgowrie
10-09-2007, 08:09 AM
In Canada, my log book was signed after the first solo was completed. Mind you that was back in 1968 and the regs may have changed since. There was no prior signed authorization.

huggy87
10-09-2007, 09:01 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Woof603:
First solo in an F86, climbing out, cleaning up the airplane, trying to keep the blue side up, and Whoosh! the F86 taking off behind me, also on first solo, barrel rolled around me. I guess you could call it real fighter pilot aggression. Needless to say, I still remember his name. With admiration. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Those were the days. A stunt like that today would have made that your friend's last flight.

Woof603
10-09-2007, 11:54 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by huggy87:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Woof603:
First solo in an F86, climbing out, cleaning up the airplane, trying to keep the blue side up, and Whoosh! the F86 taking off behind me, also on first solo, barrel rolled around me. I guess you could call it real fighter pilot aggression. Needless to say, I still remember his name. With admiration. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Those were the days. A stunt like that today would have made that your friend's last flight. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

You're right, of course, Huggy. Different eras, different approaches. I wonder which of us, you or I, had the more fun. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

buzzsaw1939
10-09-2007, 12:55 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by huggy87:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Woof603:
First solo in an F86, climbing out, cleaning up the airplane, trying to keep the blue side up, and Whoosh! the F86 taking off behind me, also on first solo, barrel rolled around me. I guess you could call it real fighter pilot aggression. Needless to say, I still remember his name. With admiration. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Those were the days. A stunt like that today would have made that your friend's last flight. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It would have in those day too! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

jolly_magpie
10-09-2007, 01:25 PM
This is quite funny to me, I "soloed" in MS FS 2004 last night!

I have decided to got for it in real life. Yes, I am going to get my Rec Pilot's license! I'm working on the lessons in FS2004 while I read all I can about ground school stuff.

I have been an airplane freak since age 8, when I saw "The Dam-Busters" on TV.

I have a feeling it will take a long time as funds are limited, But I WILL do this.

MB_Avro_UK
10-09-2007, 01:35 PM
Hi all,

Thanks for your responses http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

I liked the F-86 account..talk about confidence!!

I had an experience on my my first cross-country solo that I'll never forget.

I was returning from the coast in my Cessna 150 (not mine of course but I was entrusted with it) and ahead I saw a low layer of cloud and rain spanning right to left as far as I could see.

If I'd maintained my height I would have gone IMC...and no way would I have coped with that.If I had climbed above I would have lost sight of the ground and been faced with a blind descent.

So, I decided to fly under the weather system.

I ended up at about 500 feet following the motorways back to the airfield.The road signs were very clear http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Not exactly DR but it worked. And the weather was predicted to be clear...

At the time it was a bit of a concern to me.


Best Regards,
MB_Avro.

han freak solo
10-09-2007, 02:08 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by mortoma:
I'm curious as to what you mean by "no water"?? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It supposedly was tradition to douse a new solo pilot with buckets of water or a hose. Since I was in a flight school with other pilots, it was hyped and expected to get wet. I guess the well was dry the day I soloed, that's all.

Still, navigating was my thing, so my first solo cross country was awesome. One of my stops was at Mueller airport in Austin, Texas which was quite an experience in a Cessna 152. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Warrington_Wolf
10-09-2007, 02:12 PM
I have not gone solo yet but I have seven hours in a C-172 under my belt, and I have really enjoyed reading about what you experienced on your first solo flights. It also feels quite reassuring to know that most of you were somewhat nervous before your first solo, and that it is ok to be a bit nervous.
I am really looking forward now till it is my turn to go it alone.

ploughman
10-09-2007, 02:23 PM
The only thing I've flown solo is a parachute. After looking at RocketDog's glider threads though, I wouldn't mind me some of that.

M2morris
10-09-2007, 05:08 PM
Memorial Day 1995(May somthin or other) in a Schwiezer 2-33 at Woodbine glider field, Maryland. I soloed on that day in that half-ugly glider, but I loved the haaaail out of it.

mortoma
10-09-2007, 06:47 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Jediteo:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by danjama:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Jediteo:
Ive always wanted to fly, I'm 18 and halfway through my drivers training. How expensive is it to learn to fly?. My dad started flying a few years ago, but he had a brain haemorrhage so he had to stop halfway through the training. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>did ur dad survive the brain hemmorhage? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

He survived, had no permanent brain damage, the doctors diagnosed him with alzheimers, which later proved to be completely wrong. He'll try to get his drivers licensce back though, but its kinda hard for a 50+ man to do that (no offence pop) </div></BLOCKQUOTE>What are you trying to say here? I'm 49 and driving better than I ever have. The best drivers are from the age of 35 to 60. After that it declines but the declination in driving ability varies considerably from person to person. My dad was excellent util his death at 78 years old. I would have ridden with him anywhere.

ploughman
10-10-2007, 05:56 AM
I had my second driving lesson today, scattering them like flies I was. Just turned 38.

tomtheyak
10-10-2007, 06:31 AM
Hey Ploughman, best of luck old bean!

One thing I found was that my 3 dimensional awareness was pretty good when I started; you know percieving yourself and your relative position from other objects. I nailed parking manouevres pretty quickly thanks to that!

I have a feeling that my years in combat flight sims helped in that regard, and may well be true for you.

Oh, and my solo was in a Vigilant powered glider with a training detatchment at RAF Chivenor in 1997. Rated 'Above average'. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Jediteo
10-10-2007, 06:55 AM
QUOTE]What are you trying to say here? I'm 49 and driving better than I ever have. The best drivers are from the age of 35 to 60. After that it declines but the declination in driving ability varies considerably from person to person. My dad was excellent util his death at 78 years old. I would have ridden with him anywhere.[/QUOTE]

I'm sorry, I didn't mean to offend older people, i'm just worried my dad will have some problems with the driving theory, but thats not an age related thing.

Pluto8742
10-10-2007, 01:31 PM
My first solo was in summer 2006 in a glider. For a few weeks club members had been saying I must be close, but it was still a real surprise when it happened. I certainly didn't feel that ready. On the day I should have seen it coming because the instructor put me through every single launch failure exercise he could think of: awkward height cable breaks (get the nose down PDQ by flying a zero-g trajectory!), winch launches too slow, winch launches too fast etc. Then he walked over and said how about trying the next one on my own?

Waiting on the ground before the launch I was RATHER TENSE. However, the launch went very smoothly and suddenly I found myself at 1,300' without an instructor. The main thing I noticed was how much lighter the aircraft felt. I also felt a bit exposed. When you learn with an instructor there's a second pair of eyes in the glider looking out for other a/c. For the first time, if I didn't spot the growing dot in the distance, then nobody was going to do it for me. Sadly, there wa no lift and I was back on the ground within ten minutes, but the sense of achievement was tremendous. Next time I flew I took the glider off for 90 minutes soaring on my own. Fantastic fun.

Incidentally, all this was in a Puchacz, an aircraft with an enthusiastic spin. Adds to the excitement.

P8.

SeaFireLIV
10-10-2007, 04:25 PM
wow. I feel like a right landlubber now. Never flown a thing in my life (except a lady http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif ).

Great read.

mortoma
10-10-2007, 05:39 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by tomtheyak:
Hey Ploughman, best of luck old bean!

One thing I found was that my 3 dimensional awareness was pretty good when I started; you know percieving yourself and your relative position from other objects. I nailed parking manouevres pretty quickly thanks to that!

I have a feeling that my years in combat flight sims helped in that regard, and may well be true for you.

Oh, and my solo was in a Vigilant powered glider with a training detatchment at RAF Chivenor in 1997. Rated 'Above average'. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>My experience with MSFS, X-Plane, Fly!, FLY! II, Propilot 99 and some other civie sims absolutely helped me out a great deal when I finally took lessons in the summer of 2000. Also flying combat sims such as Red Baron II/3D, EAW and Microsoft CSFS 1 and 2 all helped out too.

IL-2 was not even a glint in Oleg's eye at that time, would have helped too if it existed then.

Simming did not help out in all ways learning to fly the real thing but it sure did help out tremendously in others. For example, I was already a veteran navigator using dead reckoning and VOR/NDB navigation techniques. My instructor did not even have to explain how to use the OBS or ADF instruments. Also, all the basic instruments were of course old hat for me. I also understood the use of the carb heat and other similar things, just to name a few.

tsisqua
10-10-2007, 06:25 PM
Yes, simming definitely helped with my training.


The day I soloed my CFI tried to kill me by spinning a Piper Cherokee 140. Also overstressed the plane on the spin recovery, which he finally pulled out of at less than 1,000 feet. I wasn't aware that the plane should have been grounded, and the entire "spin" episode reported to the FAA as an incident. He actually said: "Uhh . . . that's a bit more than I meant to do . . ." No kidding. When we fell into the spin, his words were: "Uh-Oh!" No kidding.

I was actually relieved when I got the sucker out of the plane and was able to fly it by myself . . .

I kid not.

Tsisqua

NAFP_supah
10-11-2007, 10:45 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Ploughman:
I had my second driving lesson today, scattering them like flies I was. Just turned 38. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

"I've been thinking, now that I do have my pilot's license perhaps I should get my drivers license before I become thirty http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif " Mate of mine said that, was flying as a commercial pilot at the time. Friend of my dad flew F-104G's in the airforce. Didnt drink. After a party he'd always be the on to drive home, only problem being he didnt have a driverslicense. If he got pulled over he just showed his pilot's license. That worked up untill the cops got computers so they could check if you were licensed to drive via radio! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

astro_ninja
10-15-2007, 10:54 PM
I flew once. The pilot let me taxi and he took off. Then he gave me the controls and let me fly. I did a touch n go, followed the river I lived on and flew back to where we started. It was very exciting for me being that I'm scared of heights and had never been on a plane. Just played this game since it came out, along with WW2F and Chuck Yeager's AirCombat. I will never forget the day I flew after I stayed up all night drinking.

Dash_8
10-16-2007, 06:43 AM
My first solo was a lot like others here. It was back in 1990 when I was 16. I had about 20 hours already because I started flight training when I was 15 and just had to wait until my 16th birthday to solo.

It started out just like every other lesson. We did a few touch and go's in a Cessna 152 and then my instructor told me to taxi back to the ramp. I thought, "Wow, that was a REALLY short lesson. What did I do wrong?"

He then said, "Keep it running" as he opened his door. "Give me 3 landings. Two touch and go's and a full stop and bring it back here." Then the door was closed. I also sat there for a second looking at the empty seat beside me. I thought, "I can't even drive a car yet and he wants me to fly this thing by myself?"

Off I taxied to runway 15 in Johnstown, PA (KJST). Since we never shut down I didn't do a run up. Called the tower and was cleared for takeoff.

I just kept telling myself to nail the airspeeds. Not to fast. Not to slow. If I could be on speed throughout the pattern, everything will be O.K.

So that's what I did. 100 kts on downwind. 80 on base. 67 on final and slowing to 60 as I crossed the runway threshold. An average touchdown and it was flaps up, carb heat off, and full power. One done, two to go.

The second one was pretty much identical to the first one.

For my final landing I wanted to really grease it on so I really worked hard at that one. With a soft chirp of the wheels I was done. Called ground control and taxied to the ramp.

Now, 17 years later, I do this almost everyday for a living. Here I sit with 6000+ hours and still remember that day clearly.

BOA_Allmenroder
10-16-2007, 07:48 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Dash_8:

100 kts on downwind. 80 on base. 67 on final and slowing to 60 as I crossed the runway threshold. An average touchdown and it was flaps up, carb heat off, and full power. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hey, the Cessna 150/152 mantra chant!! You're bringing back memories.... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

TX-EcoDragon
10-17-2007, 06:11 PM
Nothing like the extra hangtime in a torque roll the first time you're alone in the plane!

waaahoooo http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

mortoma
10-17-2007, 06:59 PM
Isn't 80 on base a tad fast?? I remember 70 on base in the 172 I flew. But then again, it had a STOL kit too, so that must have been it. I flew 60 knots on final all the way to touch down.