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luftluuver
08-28-2007, 05:14 AM
THE OFFICIAL RECORD

OF THE

UNITED STATES' PART

IN THE

GREAT WAR

http://statelibrary.dcr.state.nc.us/WWI/OfficialRecord.htm

Interesting map of the physical condition of draftees has those from the mid-west in the best shape.

First come those States which are indicated in outline. These are the States which sent men of so high an order of physical condition that from 70 to 80 per cent of them survived the two examinations and were accepted into the military service. It is noteworthy that these States constitute about one-quarter of all, and are mostly located in the Middle West.

Next come the States from which 65 to 69 per cent of the applicants were accepted, and these are indicated by light diagonal lines. This group is about equal in numbers with the first, and most of them are contiguous to the first group either on the east or west.

The third group makes still poorer records. Here from 60 to 64 per cent of the young men passed the tests. The States are indicated by heavy diagonal bars. Most of them were in the South and far West.

Finally, there is a group of States, including, like each of the other groups, about one-quarter of all, and indicated on the map by dotted lines. Here are the States from which 50 to 59 per cent of the candidates were accepted. They are found in the Northeast and the far West, especially in those portions of the West which have in recent years become popular as health resorts and so have attracted large numbers of physically subnormal people.

In general, it is noteworthy that the best records are made by those States that are agricultural rather than industrial, and where the numbers of recently arrived immigrants are not large. Conversely, most of the States making low records are preeminently manufacturing States and also have in their populations large numbers of recently arrived immigrants.

luftluuver
08-28-2007, 05:14 AM
THE OFFICIAL RECORD

OF THE

UNITED STATES' PART

IN THE

GREAT WAR

http://statelibrary.dcr.state.nc.us/WWI/OfficialRecord.htm

Interesting map of the physical condition of draftees has those from the mid-west in the best shape.

First come those States which are indicated in outline. These are the States which sent men of so high an order of physical condition that from 70 to 80 per cent of them survived the two examinations and were accepted into the military service. It is noteworthy that these States constitute about one-quarter of all, and are mostly located in the Middle West.

Next come the States from which 65 to 69 per cent of the applicants were accepted, and these are indicated by light diagonal lines. This group is about equal in numbers with the first, and most of them are contiguous to the first group either on the east or west.

The third group makes still poorer records. Here from 60 to 64 per cent of the young men passed the tests. The States are indicated by heavy diagonal bars. Most of them were in the South and far West.

Finally, there is a group of States, including, like each of the other groups, about one-quarter of all, and indicated on the map by dotted lines. Here are the States from which 50 to 59 per cent of the candidates were accepted. They are found in the Northeast and the far West, especially in those portions of the West which have in recent years become popular as health resorts and so have attracted large numbers of physically subnormal people.

In general, it is noteworthy that the best records are made by those States that are agricultural rather than industrial, and where the numbers of recently arrived immigrants are not large. Conversely, most of the States making low records are preeminently manufacturing States and also have in their populations large numbers of recently arrived immigrants.

MEGILE
08-28-2007, 08:48 AM
Interesting. My first thought was agriculture communities, but I also failed to consider immmigrant populations.

DuxCorvan
08-28-2007, 08:59 AM
I smell a bit of Rosenberg here and there... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

PBNA-Boosher
08-28-2007, 05:17 PM
I knew we were there! I told you so!

M_Gunz
08-28-2007, 08:27 PM
Well I don't take advertisements or package labels at face value for good reason.

If you note the age groups registered, states where there were more men over 31 would have a
lower inductee rate yet the analysis, and I use that term loosely, does not include that.
Note the percent of the total that the age 31-45 group is about as large as the 21-31 group.

It also does not account that from some places there would be less who wanted to go and
looking for an out. The country was not as uniformly politically polarized as after Pearl
Harbor during WWI and some places held more to not wanting to get involved in foreign wars,
period. A lot of those that left Europe did not want to be part of the military circus way
that was how the big countries ran things. In the end of the 19th Century it was written
in the then new Scientific American magazine that much of the prosperity of the US could be
laid down to the US spending like 10% of the GNP on military while Britain, France and Germany
were spending closer to 50%. There were a lot of sabres to rattle and they did so regularly.
Living in a town in contested area must have included a higher level of insecurity which when
I study European history for the last 1000 years, it was always bad to have an army anywhere
near -- even if you are not the target there was this thing called 'foraging' where what you
have could and did become past tense, had. I could see not wanting to be part of that way of
life and wanting nothing ever to do with it again. The big grey elephant leaves a wide trail.

It's also possible that whoever worked that out had their own biases at work.

Xiolablu3
08-29-2007, 09:59 AM
Good read, but it seems biases have crept in in a lot of places :-

'On the outbreak of hostilities there were on hand nearly 600,000 Springfield rifles of the model of 1903. This arm is probably the best Infantry rifle in use in any army'

The test of battle use has upheld the high reputation of the Springfield, and has demonstrated that the American Enfield is also a weapon of superior quality. The American troops were armed with rifles that were superior in accuracy and rapidity of fire to those used by either their enemies or the Allies.'

Is there any real reason why the Springfield '03(which I believe is essentially a Mauser 98k copy?) should be a better infantry rifle than the British Lee Enfield or the German Mauser 98K?

I am also confused as to why the report states that the American built Lee Enfield copy was such a better gun than the British Lee Enfield?


It seems this record needs a bit of tweaking and looking over by a few more historians before its made final.

ANother note, what is the 'Light Browning' they are talking about? I was thinking it surely couldnt be the BAR? More BARS than any other machine gun? I thought it was too late to see serious action in WW1.

M_Gunz
08-29-2007, 04:02 PM
Isn't that supposed to be an original document long ago from some official government numbnut?

luftluuver
08-29-2007, 04:14 PM
BAR

First issued in February 1918, it was hoped the BAR might help break the stalemate of the trenches by the concept of "walking fire"; an automatic weapon accompanying advancing squads of riflemen rushing from trench to trench.

The BAR saw little action in WWI, in part due to the Armistice, in part because the U.S. Army was reluctant to have the BAR fall into enemy hands, its first action being in September of 1918. Eighty-five thousand BARs were built by the war's end.

Max, what were you babbling about in your other post?

trivia on the BAR
The BAR also has a place in civilian history. Clyde Barrow of Bonnie and Clyde was known to prefer the use of a shortened BAR (stolen from National Guard armories) during his spree in the 1930s, rather than the stereotypical Thompson submachine gun. The six lawmen who would famously kill Bonnie and Clyde also used a variant of the BAR called the Monitor in their ambush.