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Skarphol
01-21-2004, 07:11 AM
Hi!

I was reading the Flypast magazine, and noticed that the Meteor was mentioned as "Meteor III" in the caption of one picuture, and "Meteor F.3" in the caption of another picture. Likewise, the Spit was described as Mk.IX, and then F.22. If I remember correct there was a Pr.XI too.

When and why did they leave the "Mk."-designation of planes?
Was there other prefixes than "Mk." and "Pr."?
Fortresses, Lancasters, Blenheims etc. just had roman numbers without a "B" in front. But the V-force bombers had a "B" in combination with "Mk.", i think... confusing it is!
Can anyone shed some light on this subject?

Skarphol

Skarphol
01-21-2004, 07:11 AM
Hi!

I was reading the Flypast magazine, and noticed that the Meteor was mentioned as "Meteor III" in the caption of one picuture, and "Meteor F.3" in the caption of another picture. Likewise, the Spit was described as Mk.IX, and then F.22. If I remember correct there was a Pr.XI too.

When and why did they leave the "Mk."-designation of planes?
Was there other prefixes than "Mk." and "Pr."?
Fortresses, Lancasters, Blenheims etc. just had roman numbers without a "B" in front. But the V-force bombers had a "B" in combination with "Mk.", i think... confusing it is!
Can anyone shed some light on this subject?

Skarphol

SUPERAEREO
01-21-2004, 07:21 AM
I think the change from Roman to Arabic numerals happened in 1947, but I am sure some RAF enthusiast will come up with more precise information very soon...

S!

VonShlagnoff
01-21-2004, 10:12 AM
Its all to do with NATO nomencalature and national prefixes, you think its confusing with F22, I was working on a C-130K/P Mk3A today, Go figure!!

horseback
01-21-2004, 10:42 AM
As I understand it, the standard reference in the RAF was the Mark Number, although there were differentiations for Fighter, Night Fighter, Photo Recon, and Bomber Marks as well, as given types acquired new roles. Roman numerals were used through the war years, and shortly thereafter they were switched to Arabic numerals.

For instance, the Spitfire PR MK XI was a high altitude, long range Photo-Recon version with a similar Merlin engine to the F or LF MK IXc/e during most of the war years, replaced by the Griffon engined PR MK XIX, which was redesignated PR Mk 19, often shortened to PR. 19. The Spitfire F/FR MK XVIIIE became the FR. 18, and so on.

A bomber might have been designated B MK IV during the war, and B. Mk 4 or B. 4 afterwards. Generally, the Mark number differed for each role, but this varied somewhat, depending on individual aircraft lines (Spitfire, Mosquito, Lancaster).

Hope this helps.

Cheers

horseback

"Here's your new Mustangs, boys. You can learn to fly'em on the way to the target. Cheers!" -LTCOL Don Blakeslee, 4th FG CO, February 27th, 1944