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Trent001
01-19-2005, 04:31 AM
Hi all,

As a proud Aussie, and with very little Australian content in PC games, I jumped straight into the RAAF dynamic campaign to fly a Beaufighter in New Guinea... I have a couple of questions...

1. After flying 10+ missions, I have only ever been offered 2 mission types. A) attack an enemy airfield. B) attack an enemy convoy. Question: are these the only missions I'm gonna fly until the end of the war?

2. If so, is there a way to make the 'Dynamic" campaign more... DYNAMIC?

Also, there appears to be very little ground activity. Can the amount of enemy vehicles, ships etc that are encounted be increased?

Looking forward to any response http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Trent, Western Australia

Trent001
01-19-2005, 04:31 AM
Hi all,

As a proud Aussie, and with very little Australian content in PC games, I jumped straight into the RAAF dynamic campaign to fly a Beaufighter in New Guinea... I have a couple of questions...

1. After flying 10+ missions, I have only ever been offered 2 mission types. A) attack an enemy airfield. B) attack an enemy convoy. Question: are these the only missions I'm gonna fly until the end of the war?

2. If so, is there a way to make the 'Dynamic" campaign more... DYNAMIC?

Also, there appears to be very little ground activity. Can the amount of enemy vehicles, ships etc that are encounted be increased?

Looking forward to any response http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Trent, Western Australia

Salfordian
01-19-2005, 08:20 AM
See this topic (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums?a=tpc&s=400102&f=26310365&m=2221028462) for editing intensities if you haven't allready. Maybe the ground intensity option will help

Salfordian
01-19-2005, 08:27 AM
Also try IL2DCG (http://www.lowengrin.com/news.php) I haven't got PF yet so I don't know if RAAF campaigns are set as a separate option but it shouldn't be to difficult to edit the RAF campaigns. I use it for all my RAF campaigns and have so far flown in the Battle of France, Battle of Britain and am now in 1941 on offensive sweeps over France. It is set to go all the way through the war with "tours" in North Africa, Pacific, Normandy, Ardennes and Germany. It is a pretty good tool.

RAAF_Furball
01-19-2005, 08:37 AM
I haven't tried the offline Campaigns, sorry - been having too much fun playing online.

If you want DYNAMIC, get online to Hyperlobby - http://hyperfighter.jinak.cz/ - we'll show you DYNAMIC !! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif - coupla hundred blokes just dying to give you a dynamic battle, mate !

gmot_ka
01-19-2005, 08:41 AM
I can also recommend Lowengrin's DCG. It's much more dynamic! (But less historical)

e5kimo
01-19-2005, 03:00 PM
well furball, unfortunately HL is getting less and less 'dynamic'. far from 100 blokes. 10 if you are lucky that acctually want to fly instead of chat. after some strange encounters with II/JG2 i dont really feel compelled to go back to HL. at least in our timezone it seems pointless.

the dynamic campaign for the beaufighter is an absolute joke. borefighter more like.

i might give dcg another try. it was great for europe so i hope that by now RAAF is included.

RAAF_Furball
01-24-2005, 08:27 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by e5kimo:
well furball, unfortunately HL is getting less and less 'dynamic'. far from 100 blokes. 10 if you are lucky that acctually want to fly instead of chat. after some strange encounters with II/JG2 i dont really feel compelled to go back to HL. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Maaaaaaaaaate - we're all different. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I just came offline (probably while you're still tucked in bed?) http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif and there were 250 online.

MGBurrows
01-28-2005, 11:40 AM
Goo' day.

Unfortunately, except as a ground-attack pilot any RAAF campaign in the Pacific Theater will be very limited because MacArthur hated you Australians and side-lined your entire military. That's why Blamey just sort fought his own little private war along the periphery of the Theater. It will be even more limited because in PF there are no maps of Borneo or most of the other places the AIF fought, just eastern New Guinea.
Clyde "Killer" Caldwell, the leading RAAF ace of WWII with either 24 or 26 victories against the Luftwaffe and Reggia Aeronautica over North Africa, never saw another hostile aircraft after arriving in the PTO. He spent the remainder of the war flying CAP missions from Darwin. He was a very frustrated man.
I'll be generating a RAAF pilot for my New Guinea campaign, but his career will be short-lived. I pretty much suck at ground-attack, so he'll be flying P-40C's and then Spits should he survive long enough.
If we had a North Africa map we could fly there for the RAAF and have a good campaign, BUT...

RAC_Pips
01-28-2005, 04:58 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by MGBurrows:
MacArthur hated you Australians and side-lined your entire military. That's why Blamey just sort fought his own little private war along the periphery of the Theater. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Really!? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif It may surprise you to know that the Australian 5th, 6th, 7th and 9th Divisions made up more than half of the Allied land forces throughout the New Guinea campaign from '42 to '44.

As far as being sidelined that's only true of MacArthur's invasion of the Philipines in late'44. He wasn't willing to have the Australians steal any of his glory. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Which really wasn't a problem as by that time the Australians were planning the invasion of Borneo and the Dutch East Indies.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Clyde "Killer" Caldwell, the leading RAAF ace of WWII with either 24 or 26 victories against the Luftwaffe and Reggia Aeronautica over North Africa, never saw another hostile aircraft after arriving in the PTO. He spent the remainder of the war flying CAP missions from Darwin. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Clive Caldwell claimed 18 German and 4 Italian aircraft destroyed in the desert. After a rest he commanded 1 Australian Spitfire Wing at Darwin from March to September 1943. In that time he claimed 5 A6m Zero's, 1 B5N Kate, 1 G4M Betty and 1 Ki-46 Dinah. No.1 Wing claimed in the same period 54 aircraft.

Again rested and then posted to a Operational Training Unit he returned to combat flying in February 1945 when he commanded 80 Wing (Spitfires) at Morotai in the East Indies. At this stage of the War there was little for the Spitfires to do, other than carry out costly ground strike missions against heavily fortified bases. Caldwell and several other prominant aces tried to resign their commissions in April '45 as a protest for such wasteful operations - claiming that these operations were in no way affecting the outcome of the War, s the Japanese bases they were attacking had been bypassed and neutralised. For trying to save the lives of his men he and two others were relieved of their commands and transferred back to Australia.

hobnail
01-28-2005, 05:38 PM
Back on topic....

Lowengrin also has hosted an improved and more detailed New Guniea campaign, made by Redeye.

http://www.lowengrin.com/download.php?view.48

MGBurrows
02-01-2005, 12:32 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by RAC_Pips:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by MGBurrows:
MacArthur hated you Australians and side-lined your entire military. That's why Blamey just sort fought his own little private war along the periphery of the Theater. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Really!? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif It may surprise you to know that the Australian 5th, 6th, 7th and 9th Divisions made up more than half of the Allied land forces throughout the New Guinea campaign from '42 to '44.

As far as being sidelined that's only true of MacArthur's invasion of the Philipines in late'44. He wasn't willing to have the Australians steal any of his glory. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Which really wasn't a problem as by that time the Australians were planning the invasion of Borneo and the Dutch East Indies.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Clyde "Killer" Caldwell, the leading RAAF ace of WWII with either 24 or 26 victories against the Luftwaffe and Reggia Aeronautica over North Africa, never saw another hostile aircraft after arriving in the PTO. He spent the remainder of the war flying CAP missions from Darwin. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Clive Caldwell claimed 18 German and 4 Italian aircraft destroyed in the desert. After a rest he commanded 1 Australian Spitfire Wing at Darwin from March to September 1943. In that time he claimed 5 A6m Zero's, 1 B5N Kate, 1 G4M Betty and 1 Ki-46 Dinah. No.1 Wing claimed in the same period 54 aircraft.

Again rested and then posted to a Operational Training Unit he returned to combat flying in February 1945 when he commanded 80 Wing (Spitfires) at Morotai in the East Indies. At this stage of the War there was little for the Spitfires to do, other than carry out costly ground strike missions against heavily fortified bases. Caldwell and several other prominant aces tried to resign their commissions in April '45 as a protest for such wasteful operations - claiming that these operations were in no way affecting the outcome of the War, s the Japanese bases they were attacking had been bypassed and neutralised. For trying to save the lives of his men he and two others were relieved of their commands and transferred back to Australia. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


There was was no 5th Division in the 2nd AIF, the 5th Division was 1st AIF. The 2nd AIF had the 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th Divisions (The 9th being my favorite). The 8th Division was lost at Singapore.
New Guinea was the only campaign the 2nd AIF participated in beside U.S. troops. You might note that I said I would be generating a RAAF pilot for the New Guinea Campaign. His career will end when Eastern New Guinea is in Allied hands. Can't fly over Wewak or Aitape...
MacArthur said that the Australians were the worst soldiers he had ever seen. I have always considered that an interesting opinion considering that Australians have shown themselves to be the finest combat infantry of the 20th Century. It takes the most elite combat formations of other nations to match regular Australian infantry in fighting ability. Ill-trained and half-equipped Australian militia proved as good as anything anyone else could put on the ground, as the Japanese learned on the Kakoda Trail and at Milne Bay.
Borneo and the Dutch East Indies were Blamey's private little war. That's just what I was talking about, Friend. They were periphery campaigns unecessary to the defeat of Japan, but the Australians did not want to be left sitting there with their thumbs up their arses when MacArthur would not have them participate in the main thrusts to the north.
You are right, it was Clive. Oops, Clyde just popped into my head, but now that you mention it I remember it was Clive. However, according to what I have about him he did not contact any Japanese aircraft after his transfer to the PTO. He left the MTO with 22 victories. I knew it was somewhere in that vicinity.
I am always seeking more information on the two AIF's, but here in the USA it can be quite difficult to obtain books concerning the subject. I had to pay $60.00 to get a used copy of Australian Armor. I know a lot about them, but not as much as I'd like.
MacArthur was an out-standing general, but as an individual he was an egoistic **** of ungodly proportions. The only ego comparable to his I've ever encountered would be General George Brinton McClellan, whose ego was even worse, though not by much. At least we can say MacArthur knew what he doing on the battlefield, can't say that about Little Mac.

Zyzbot
02-01-2005, 02:33 PM
Here is a link to a list of Caldwell's claims. It definitley includes Japanese aircraft...notice the Japanese kill markings on his aircraft:

http://www.elknet.pl/acestory/caldw/caldw.htmhttp://www.elknet.pl/acestory/foto1/caldw2.jpg

RAC_Pips
02-01-2005, 03:10 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>I am always seeking more information on the two AIF's, but here in the USA it can be quite difficult to obtain books concerning the subject. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Let me add to your knowledge. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Australia effectively had two Armies in WWII. The best known was the AIF (Regular Army) which consisted of the 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th Divisions and the 1st Armoured Corps.

The second was the CMF (Militia) which consisted of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 11th and 12th Divisions and New Guinea Force.

Both forces fought in the War. The AIF units firstly in the Mediterranean and then in the Pacific, usually at Divisional strength. The CMF only fought in the Pacific and, because of the nature of the fighting which favoured small(er) unit action, usually at Brigade strength. The only CMF Division to actually operate at Divisional strength (in New Guinea) was the 5th.

And may I correct some misconceptions mentioned above.

a) Caldwell did score several victories over the Japanese whilst based in Darwin. A good book to get your hands on is Asutralian Air Aces, by Dennis Newton. ISBN 1 875671 25 0

b) When MacArthur went north from New Guinea to the Philipines in '44 (admittedly refusing Australia help) Blamey went west into Timor and the Dutch East Indies. Not to fight his own private war, but at the behest of the Australian Governemnt to clear out the islands still close to Australia and considered a threat. Several noted American and British authors have made the claim that those Australian campaigns of '45 were unnecessary given that the Bomb was about to drop. But the Australian Government (like many Americans) was not privy to that knwoeldge, and was still persuing the War strategy that Japan would eventually have to be invaded. And so it made sense to clear out the 'backyard' so to speak.

By the way for Operation Olympic (the invasion of Japan) the Australian involvemnt included the use of the 6th, 9th and 1st Armoured Corps Divisions of the AIF and the 1st, 2nd, 4th and 11th Divisions of the CMF.

c) The Australian II Corps, consisting of 5 Brigades from the 3rd and 5th CMF Divisions, also served on Bougainville from December '44 with the responsibility of clearing the Island of the Japanese. Now that was definitely a questionable campaign.

If you are really interested in finding out more about Australia's involvement in both WWI and WWII then go to this site.
http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages-conflicts-periods/ww2/pages-2aif-cmf/00-2nd_aif-index.htm

It is by far and away the most comprehensive site on the Net for Australia at War.

Cheers. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

MGBurrows
02-02-2005, 09:49 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by RAC_Pips:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>I am always seeking more information on the two AIF's, but here in the USA it can be quite difficult to obtain books concerning the subject. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Let me add to your knowledge. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Australia effectively had two Armies in WWII. The best known was the AIF (Regular Army) which consisted of the 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th Divisions and the 1st Armoured Corps.

The second was the CMF (Militia) which consisted of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 11th and 12th Divisions and New Guinea Force.

Both forces fought in the War. The AIF units firstly in the Mediterranean and then in the Pacific, usually at Divisional strength. The CMF only fought in the Pacific and, because of the nature of the fighting which favoured small(er) unit action, usually at Brigade strength. The only CMF Division to actually operate at Divisional strength (in New Guinea) was the 5th.

And may I correct some misconceptions mentioned above.

a) Caldwell did score several victories over the Japanese whilst based in Darwin. A good book to get your hands on is Asutralian Air Aces, by Dennis Newton. ISBN 1 875671 25 0

b) When MacArthur went north from New Guinea to the Philipines in '44 (admittedly refusing Australia help) Blamey went west into Timor and the Dutch East Indies. Not to fight his own private war, but at the behest of the Australian Governemnt to clear out the islands still close to Australia and considered a threat. Several noted American and British authors have made the claim that those Australian campaigns of '45 were unnecessary given that the Bomb was about to drop. But the Australian Government (like many Americans) was not privy to that knwoeldge, and was still persuing the War strategy that Japan would eventually have to be invaded. And so it made sense to clear out the 'backyard' so to speak.

By the way for Operation Olympic (the invasion of Japan) the Australian involvemnt included the use of the 6th, 9th and 1st Armoured Corps Divisions of the AIF and the 1st, 2nd, 4th and 11th Divisions of the CMF.

c) The Australian II Corps, consisting of 5 Brigades from the 3rd and 5th CMF Divisions, also served on Bougainville from December '44 with the responsibility of clearing the Island of the Japanese. Now that was definitely a questionable campaign.

If you are really interested in finding out more about Australia's involvement in both WWI and WWII then go to this site.
http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages-conflicts-periods/ww2/pages-2aif-cmf/00-2nd_aif-index.htm

It is by far and away the most comprehensive site on the Net for Australia at War.

Cheers. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Very good, and I thank the both of you. It was an Osprey book I had read which gave me the impression Caldwell had no contact with the Japanese. That photo of him next to his Spit obviously displays the incorrectness of the work in question. But, then, it's Osprey. I have never viewed them as definitive or totally reliable. In their Campaign Series book on Normandy there were a number of silly mistakes, including listing the same Schwere SS Panzer Abteilung twice as two different formations: They showed on their Order of Battle section the 101st Schwere SS Panzer Abteilung and the 501st Schwere SS Panzer Abteilung. They are the same unit; each Schwere SS Panzer Abteilung had two designations: 101/501, 102/502, & 103/503. And, that's only one of the mistakes.
On that 5th Division bit: Well enough, you should have specified CMF. I wasn't even aware they had their militia organized on the division level as I always read of them as battalions. I know the AIF fairly well, I know they did not repeat divisional numbers from the 1st AIF in the 2nd, and I know the 5th Division AIF was WWI.
That would be the Australian view of those campaigns, and it's a fully justifiable one. Blamey - whom I like, by the way, nothing against him at all - definitely had the approval of his government. It was still because you people are of such a competitive nature that you wouldn't let MacArthur make you sit the rest of the War out. Y'all were chomping at the bit to get at the Japanese and simply saw to it that you did. Beyond New Guinea, though, the East Indies could have been left to hang as they were being isolated like many other Japanese positions by the main thrusts from the west and south. Just, Australians don't quit and necessary or not they decided to clean up their own backyard anyway.
Thank you for the links and info, I shall avail myself of them. Would either of you know how I could acquire a copy of the Australian official histories of WWI & II? I've been hunting for them for some time...

MGBurrows
02-02-2005, 10:10 AM
Oh, also, I have an Akubra of 1950's vintage with the snap to pin the brim up. I'd love to get one of WWII and/or I vintage without the snap. I have my ACMF badge pinned under the left side of the brim, which is down as I have seen it in several photos. Is there a place down there I can order one of such vintage?

RAC_Pips
02-02-2005, 01:06 PM
Two places you can try MG for the Official Histories.

The first is the Australian War Memorial Book Shop at
http://cas.awm.gov.au/pls/PRD/cst.acct_master?surl=551692011ZZZLTROANDZIV25714&stype=3&simplesearch=&v_umo=&v_product_id=&screen_name=shop_pkg.pr_home&screen_parms=acid=&screen_type=BOTTOM&bvers=4&bplatform=Microsoft%20Internet%20Explorer&bos=Win32
On the right side of the page is a contact link.

The other is Crusader Books.
http://www.crusaderbooks.com.au/public/home.ehtml

I would suggest that you email both places, and request both and availability and price of the Histories.

Good luck. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

MGBurrows
02-08-2005, 11:20 AM
Okay, I hope this post doesn't go "POOF!" and disappear like my other two responses did. (Actually, several of my posts on other threads have done the same, which I found very frustrating.)

I referred to it as Blamey's private war not meaning to imply that he had just coopted the AIF on his own and gone off on his own. He had the full support of his government. I've always looked at it that way because it was pretty well unnecessary as the Japanese forces on those islands could have been easily just left to hang. Sort of like what we did with the Japanese forces occupying Wake, just let them sit there and rot. We did find a use for them, however: Target practice.
You Australians just went off and did your own thing when MacArthur wouldn't let you participate in the main thrust. You're a tough lot and very competitive and wouldn't just sit there with your thumbs up your tails, so you went looking for trouble for trouble's sake.
That photo of Caldwell above pretty well proves that source (An Osprey work) wrong. No real surprise there. Their Campaign series book on Normandy had a number of errors. Not the least of which is in the German Order of Battle section where it lists the same formation twice as though it was two different units. It lists both the 101st Schwere SS Panzer Abteilung and the 501st Schwere SS Panzer Abteilung. They're both the same unit. For some peculiar reason - there are theories, but nothing proven. I think it was an intelligence ploy to make one unit seem like two - each Schwere SS Panzer Abteilung had two designations: 101/501, 102/502 and 103/503. There were only three Schwere SS Panzer Abteilungen, yet six designations. Evidently, the author of the work was unaware of this.
I have visited both the sites you two posted, they're both really good, thank you.
I have recently managed to locate a history of the 9th Division AIF and I can't wait for it to arrive.
I have an Akubra of 1950's vintage. Is there a way I can get one of WWII vintage without the snap?
Also, I have long been seeking to get my grubby hands on a copy the Australian official histories of the First and Second World Wars, would either of you have an inkling of how I might be able to acquire a set of each?

Bluedog72
02-08-2005, 08:05 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>
MacArthur said that the Australians were the worst soldiers he had ever seen. I have always considered that an interesting opinion considering that Australians have shown themselves to be the finest combat infantry of the 20th Century. It takes the most elite combat formations of other nations to match regular Australian infantry in fighting ability. Ill-trained and half-equipped Australian militia proved as good as anything anyone else could put on the ground, as the Japanese learned on the Kakoda Trail and at Milne Bay...



.....MacArthur was an out-standing general, but as an individual he was an egoistic **** of ungodly proportions.. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>



Theres your reason the Diggers and MacArthur didn't get along....arrogance and ego, MacArthur's.
He didn't like Aussie troops (diggers they're called), because they showed him no respect whatsoever.
I dare say a lot of Diggers thought MacArthur was the worste general they ever saw.

Australian soldiers are notorious for their lack of military discipline, particularly when showing respect to an officer(especially a foreign one).....the Brit officers in WWI didn't take real kindly to Aussies either, for the same reason.

MacArthur was used to being held in awe, and treated with the utmost respect, neither of which was ever going to come from a Digger after he ran away from the Phillipines (ordered to or not, makes no differance)with his proverbial tail between his legs, leaving his men to their fate.

If he had refused orders to leave, and stayed with his men and died, he would have been honoured and revered here.
Had he refused orders, stayed and fought, and survived, he would have had the unlimited respect of every Aussie alive, they would follow him to Hell if he asked.

But he didn't, he left the Phillipines and his men to whatever fate awaited them, and made a big show about how "I will return".....not 'we', "I".

To an Australian Infantryman, MacArthur may have a few stars on his shoulders and a hugely inflated opinion of himself, but he sure as Hell was no soldier or officer, let alone general grade.
There was no respect given because in the eyes of your average Aussie, he deserved none.

He may have had an outstanding career up to the invasion of the Phillipines, and perhaps that career and it's acheivements were common knowledge to an American, but to an Australian, MacArthur will allways be 'the bloke who bugged out and abandoned his men'
Deserved or not, MacArthurs reputation of someone who would run and leave you hanging when the **** hit the fan certainly didnt help his cause.

Flame away folks, I know thats gonna drive some of you nuts.


The fact that these scruffy, disrespectfull, shifty looking characters that wouldn't salute were every bit as good as his home baked, Mom and Apple Pie, respectfull American boys when it came time to actually get to grips with the enemy and fight no doubt annoyed him no end too.
How could anyone so un-soldierly in action and appearance be such a **** good fighter when it came to the crunch.

Man this forumn needs a 'preview post' button.

HotelBushranger
02-09-2005, 02:15 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>quote:Originally posted by RAC_Pips:

quote:Originally posted by MGBurrows:
MacArthur hated you Australians and side-lined your entire military. That's why Blamey just sort fought his own little private war along the periphery of the Theater.



Really!? Roll Eyes It may surprise you to know that the Australian 5th, 6th, 7th and 9th Divisions made up more than half of the Allied land forces throughout the New Guinea campaign from '42 to '44.

As far as being sidelined that's only true of MacArthur's invasion of the Philipines in late'44. He wasn't willing to have the Australians steal any of his glory. Smile Which really wasn't a problem as by that time the Australians were planning the invasion of Borneo and the Dutch East Indies.

quote:Clyde "Killer" Caldwell, the leading RAAF ace of WWII with either 24 or 26 victories against the Luftwaffe and Reggia Aeronautica over North Africa, never saw another hostile aircraft after arriving in the PTO. He spent the remainder of the war flying CAP missions from Darwin.



Clive Caldwell claimed 18 German and 4 Italian aircraft destroyed in the desert. After a rest he commanded 1 Australian Spitfire Wing at Darwin from March to September 1943. In that time he claimed 5 A6m Zero's, 1 B5N Kate, 1 G4M Betty and 1 Ki-46 Dinah. No.1 Wing claimed in the same period 54 aircraft.

Again rested and then posted to a Operational Training Unit he returned to combat flying in February 1945 when he commanded 80 Wing (Spitfires) at Morotai in the East Indies. At this stage of the War there was little for the Spitfires to do, other than carry out costly ground strike missions against heavily fortified bases. Caldwell and several other prominant aces tried to resign their commissions in April '45 as a protest for such wasteful operations - claiming that these operations were in no way affecting the outcome of the War, s the Japanese bases they were attacking had been bypassed and neutralised. For trying to save the lives of his men he and two others were relieved of their commands and transferred back to Australia.



There was was no 5th Division in the 2nd AIF, the 5th Division was 1st AIF. The 2nd AIF had the 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th Divisions (The 9th being my favorite). The 8th Division was lost at Singapore.
New Guinea was the only campaign the 2nd AIF participated in beside U.S. troops. You might note that I said I would be generating a RAAF pilot for the New Guinea Campaign. His career will end when Eastern New Guinea is in Allied hands. Can't fly over Wewak or Aitape...
MacArthur said that the Australians were the worst soldiers he had ever seen. I have always considered that an interesting opinion considering that Australians have shown themselves to be the finest combat infantry of the 20th Century. It takes the most elite combat formations of other nations to match regular Australian infantry in fighting ability. Ill-trained and half-equipped Australian militia proved as good as anything anyone else could put on the ground, as the Japanese learned on the Kakoda Trail and at Milne Bay.
Borneo and the Dutch East Indies were Blamey's private little war. That's just what I was talking about, Friend. They were periphery campaigns unecessary to the defeat of Japan, but the Australians did not want to be left sitting there with their thumbs up their arses when MacArthur would not have them participate in the main thrusts to the north.
You are right, it was Clive. Oops, Clyde just popped into my head, but now that you mention it I remember it was Clive. However, according to what I have about him he did not contact any Japanese aircraft after his transfer to the PTO. He left the MTO with 22 victories. I knew it was somewhere in that vicinity.
I am always seeking more information on the two AIF's, but here in the USA it can be quite difficult to obtain books concerning the subject. I had to pay $60.00 to get a used copy of Australian Armor. I know a lot about them, but not as much as I'd like.
MacArthur was an out-standing general, but as an individual he was an egoistic **** of ungodly proportions. The only ego comparable to his I've ever encountered would be General George Brinton McClellan, whose ego was even worse, though not by much. At least we can say MacArthur knew what he doing on the battlefield, can't say that about Little Mac.

Theres your reason the Diggers and MacArthur didn't get along....arrogance and ego, MacArthur's.
He didn't like Aussie troops (diggers they're called), because they showed him no respect whatsoever.
I dare say a lot of Diggers thought MacArthur was the worste general they ever saw.

Australian soldiers are notorious for their lack of military discipline, particularly when showing respect to an officer(especially a foreign one).....the Brit officers in WWI didn't take real kindly to Aussies either, for the same reason.

MacArthur was used to being held in awe, and treated with the utmost respect, neither of which was ever going to come from a Digger after he ran away from the Phillipines (ordered to or not, makes no differance)with his proverbial tail between his legs, leaving his men to their fate.

If he had refused orders to leave, and stayed with his men and died, he would have been honoured and revered here.
Had he refused orders, stayed and fought, and survived, he would have had the unlimited respect of every Aussie alive, they would follow him to Hell if he asked.

But he didn't, he left the Phillipines and his men to whatever fate awaited them, and made a big show about how "I will return".....not 'we', "I".

To an Australian Infantryman, MacArthur may have a few stars on his shoulders and a hugely inflated opinion of himself, but he sure as Hell was no soldier or officer, let alone general grade.
There was no respect given because in the eyes of your average Aussie, he deserved none.

He may have had an outstanding career up to the invasion of the Phillipines, and perhaps that career and it's acheivements were common knowledge to an American, but to an Australian, MacArthur will allways be 'the bloke who bugged out and abandoned his men'
Deserved or not, MacArthurs reputation of someone who would run and leave you hanging when the **** hit the fan certainly didnt help his cause.

Flame away folks, I know thats gonna drive some of you nuts.


The fact that these scruffy, disrespectfull, shifty looking characters that wouldn't salute were every bit as good as his home baked, Mom and Apple Pie, respectfull American boys when it came time to actually get to grips with the enemy and fight no doubt annoyed him no end too.
How could anyone so un-soldierly in action and appearance be such a **** good fighter when it came to the crunch. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Bloody oath!!!

Our diggers, I can say with pride, were, and continue to be, the best fighting force a country could ever hope for. And I think, one of the reasons, is that we're always at the short end of the stick, which means we, like Australia at that time, had to grow up on its own, and rely on their mates to pull them through. Time and again, by the British in WW1, and under American generals, namely MacArthur, us Aussies were viewed as cr@p, useless bits of meat to use as cannon fodder. Also, the ego of the leadership in New Guinea, to use an example, an Australian, I think it was General Rowell, or some other Australian officer, suggested to the American CO at the airfield where the C-47 'Biscuit Bombers' were stationed, that instead of lining up the bombers wingtip to wingtip, which was the situation, to put them in the revetments that the Diggers had made, which wern't being used. Of course, this was disobeyed, god forbid an American would talk orders from an Australian. So the bombers where still wingtip to wingtip, when a bunch of Betty's flew up and bombed them, with only one quick run. This happened TWICE, and still they didn't take the hint. So of course our Diggers go without food for another few weeks. The 39th were fighting for 8 weeks, a large majority of that without food.

Another reason, is the complete ignorance of the people who are in charge. Now I'm not saying its Americans only, gawd we has some shocking officers, Gen. Blamey, Major General Morris, and Major Cameron to name a few. They were hundreds (besides Cameron) of miles from the front, yet they were expecting all these things, when they had absolutely NO idea of what the conditions were like. One example is the fabled 'Kokoda Gap' a section of land in between the Kokoda plateau and the rest of the Owen Stanley Ranges, that supposedly even a company could keep off an entire army, with enough ammo. One US General was quoted as saying it could be blocked off with explosives! Of course, when the 39th reached the Kokoda plateau, they saw that the Kokoda Gap wasn't much of a gap in western terms, it was 10 miles long! That sort of thing shows complete ignorance and stubborness to actually face the facts, from what they were being told by veterans in the field. Arrrr, gets my blood boiled up sometimes.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> There was was no 5th Division in the 2nd AIF, the 5th Division was 1st AIF. The 2nd AIF had the 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th Divisions (The 9th being my favorite). The 8th Division was lost at Singapore.
New Guinea was the only campaign the 2nd AIF participated in beside U.S. troops. You might note that I said I would be generating a RAAF pilot for the New Guinea Campaign. His career will end when Eastern New Guinea is in Allied hands. Can't fly over Wewak or Aitape... <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The 7th is my favourite http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif because of their actions in the PNG campaign. As for the US troops, yes they did send a battalion of US troops to "cut 'em off at the pass". Of course, they bloody get lost. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif



Anyways, I better stop or I'll go on forever (literally).

Errr, what was this topic originally about anyway?