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Woof603
10-02-2006, 06:58 PM
The US standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet,
8.5 inches.

That's an exceedingly odd number. Why was that gauge used?
Because that's the way they built them in England, and English expatriates built the US Railroads.

Why did the English build them like that?
Because the first rail lines were built by the same people who built the pre-railroad tramways, and that's the gauge they used.

Why did "they" use that gauge then?
Because the people who built the tramways used the same jigs and tools that they used for building wagons, which used that wheel spacing.

Okay! Why did the wagons have that particular odd wheel spacing?
Well, if they tried to use any other spacing, the wagon wheels would break on some of the old, long distance roads in England, because
that's the spacing of the wheel ruts.

So who built those old rutted roads?
Imperial Rome built the first long distance roads in Europe (and England) for their legions. The roads have been used ever since.

And the ruts in the roads?
Roman war chariots formed the initial ruts, which everyone else had to match for fear of destroying their wagon wheels. Since the chariots were made for Imperial Rome, they were all alike in the matter of wheel spacing.

The United States standard railroad gauge of 4 feet, 8.5 inches is derived from the original specifications for an Imperial Roman war chariot. And bureaucracies live forever.

So the next time you are handed a specification and wonder what horse's *** came up with it, you may be exactly right, because the Imperial Roman army chariots were made just wide enough to accommodate the back ends of two war horses.

Now, the twist to the story.
When you see a Space Shuttle sitting on its launch pad, there are two big booster rockets attached to the sides of the main fuel tank. These are solid rocket boosters, or SRBs.
The SRBs are made by Thiokol at their factory at Utah. The engineers who designed the SRBs would have preferred to make them a bit fatter, but the SRBs had to be shipped by train from the factory to the launch site.

The railroad line from the factory happens to run through a tunnel in the mountains. The SRBs had to fit through that tunnel. The tunnel is slightly wider than the railroad track, and the railroad track, as you now know, is about as wide as two horses' behinds.

So, a major Space Shuttle design feature of what is arguably the world's most advanced transportation system was determined over two thousand years ago by the width of a horse's ***.

- And -

You thought being a HORSE'S *** wasn't important

(This is not original. It was sent to me)

Woof603
10-02-2006, 06:58 PM
The US standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet,
8.5 inches.

That's an exceedingly odd number. Why was that gauge used?
Because that's the way they built them in England, and English expatriates built the US Railroads.

Why did the English build them like that?
Because the first rail lines were built by the same people who built the pre-railroad tramways, and that's the gauge they used.

Why did "they" use that gauge then?
Because the people who built the tramways used the same jigs and tools that they used for building wagons, which used that wheel spacing.

Okay! Why did the wagons have that particular odd wheel spacing?
Well, if they tried to use any other spacing, the wagon wheels would break on some of the old, long distance roads in England, because
that's the spacing of the wheel ruts.

So who built those old rutted roads?
Imperial Rome built the first long distance roads in Europe (and England) for their legions. The roads have been used ever since.

And the ruts in the roads?
Roman war chariots formed the initial ruts, which everyone else had to match for fear of destroying their wagon wheels. Since the chariots were made for Imperial Rome, they were all alike in the matter of wheel spacing.

The United States standard railroad gauge of 4 feet, 8.5 inches is derived from the original specifications for an Imperial Roman war chariot. And bureaucracies live forever.

So the next time you are handed a specification and wonder what horse's *** came up with it, you may be exactly right, because the Imperial Roman army chariots were made just wide enough to accommodate the back ends of two war horses.

Now, the twist to the story.
When you see a Space Shuttle sitting on its launch pad, there are two big booster rockets attached to the sides of the main fuel tank. These are solid rocket boosters, or SRBs.
The SRBs are made by Thiokol at their factory at Utah. The engineers who designed the SRBs would have preferred to make them a bit fatter, but the SRBs had to be shipped by train from the factory to the launch site.

The railroad line from the factory happens to run through a tunnel in the mountains. The SRBs had to fit through that tunnel. The tunnel is slightly wider than the railroad track, and the railroad track, as you now know, is about as wide as two horses' behinds.

So, a major Space Shuttle design feature of what is arguably the world's most advanced transportation system was determined over two thousand years ago by the width of a horse's ***.

- And -

You thought being a HORSE'S *** wasn't important

(This is not original. It was sent to me)

Feathered_IV
10-02-2006, 07:05 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif


*In my best John Cleese voice*

"What 'ave the Romans ever done for us?"

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

gdfo
10-02-2006, 07:07 PM
Egg sell ent

heywooood
10-02-2006, 07:09 PM
this is the number one best thread ever...

I hope the OT threadkiller mod will spare it a while....he's a real horses uno whatsky

Targ
10-02-2006, 07:30 PM
Heh, I wonder if anyone has ever checked this out at snopes.

berg417448
10-02-2006, 07:31 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Targ:
Heh, I wonder if anyone has ever checked this out at snopes. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Uh-oH! Snopes say it is false:

http://www.snopes.com/history/american/gauge.htm

Targ
10-02-2006, 07:35 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by berg417448:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Targ:
Heh, I wonder if anyone has ever checked this out at snopes. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Uh-oH! Snopes say it is false:

http://www.snopes.com/history/american/gauge.htm </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

Rattler68
10-02-2006, 07:42 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Targ:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by berg417448:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Targ:
Heh, I wonder if anyone has ever checked this out at snopes. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Uh-oH! Snopes say it is false:

http://www.snopes.com/history/american/gauge.htm </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Thread blasted by a FW-190 A8 with mk. 103's...

heywooood
10-02-2006, 07:46 PM
like I said - number one best thread ever....

Daiichidoku
10-02-2006, 07:46 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

start a thread and win it too, all in the same post

Von_Rat
10-02-2006, 07:51 PM
imperial rome didnt have war chariots, they had some for show im sure, but as a instrument of war they were outmoded by the time of imperial rome.


maybe it was their supply wagons that are reponsiable.

BiscuitKnight
10-02-2006, 10:30 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by berg417448:
Uh-oH! Snopes say it is false:

http://www.snopes.com/history/american/gauge.htm </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Snopes says everything is false.

I marvel at their explanation: it doesn't really disprove much. I mean, they agree that it WAS the width of "horses' asses" that dictated the width of roads, and therefore the width of track size and therefore why a particular gauge was used. The statement that if the Civil War had been different it would have changed things is riddiculous: yes, if the South had won, and if the South had chosen to use a different gauge such as Narrow or Broad that was nothing like the width of two horses then yes, the width of the gauge wouldn't have been determined by horses' asses - but it was! That statement is pure Snopes idiocy.

Snopes is probably 50% right: yes, the width of roads was always dictated by the width of horses and thus not by the Roman Empire, which undermines the story's suggestion that it was the Roman Empire that dictated the width of US rail gauge. Snopes is also (they concede that no sources are available) right about the width of track not determining the width of the shuttle boosters, although Snopes doesn't concede that Tiger tanks, for example, were partially dismantled to fit on rolling stock because they were too wide, therefore proving that the width of track is a constraint in many circumstances - again, typical Snopes - so Snopes gets some things right: it was a factor (the width of a horse) that dictated road width beyond the Romans' control, and thus it wasn't the Roman's choice that dictated the road width. However, it WAS the width of a horse that dictated road and tram and track width, the main point of the story! And the point stands that the same width is common from ancient roads to modern US railways. So was the size of the Shuttle's boosters dictated by the Romans? Nope. Was the size of track? Nope. But track, trams, roads, etc were dictated by the size of a horses ***!

Charos
10-03-2006, 01:32 AM
Wiki Loading Gauge (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loading_gauge)

Rail rollingstock and freight size is determined
by "Loading Gauge" which varies even with standard gauge rail.

As stated in Wiki's "standard gauge" document
Wiki standard gauge (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_gauge)

The English railway pioneer George Stephenson spent much of his early engineering career working for the coal mines of County Durham. The Stockton and Darlington Railway (S&DR), the world's first steam-powered railway, was built primarily to transport coal from several mines near Shildon to the port at Stockton-on-Tees. The S&DR's track gauge was set to accommodate the existing gauge of hundreds of horse-drawn chaldron wagons that were already in use on the wagonways in the mines. Stephenson used the same gauge for the Liverpool and Manchester Railway opened five years later. The success of this led to Stephenson (and his son Robert) being employed to engineer several other larger railway projects. This influence appears to be the main reason that this particular gauge became the standard, and its usage became more widespread than any other gauge.

A popular legend traces the origin of the 4 ft 8 in (1435 mm) gauge even further back than the coalfields of northern England, pointing to the evidence of rutted roads marked by chariot wheels dating from the Roman Empire. This legend is regarded as mostly false, however, except inasmuch that it shows a historical tendency to place the wheels of horse-drawn vehicles approximately 5 ft (1500 mm) apart, which probably derives simply from the width needed to fit the horse between the shafts.

The conection is more directly related to early horse drawn railways used in mines and indirectly to highway useage.

But in either case the horse is the common theme so there is merit in the latter argument none the less.

F19_Orheim
10-03-2006, 02:58 AM
Not sure about a HORSE's *** but the leap from il2 to a cow's *** is not far. I mean, a SIM is always a sim!!! Here is the bovine rectal palpation simulator.


http://spike-washburn.vpscenter.com/blog/archives/000087.php



Apperently the research group is also working an a horse's *** version, so dont think you are so far fetched mate http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

zbw_109
10-03-2006, 03:18 AM
Nice, note tone of voice

DuxCorvan
10-03-2006, 04:59 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Von_Rat:
imperial rome didnt have war chariots, they had some for show im sure, but as a instrument of war they were outmoded by the time of imperial rome.


maybe it was their supply wagons that are reponsiable. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ditto. Rome didn't use chariots at war. They were obsolescent. In the times Rome conquered Britania, only the local British celtic tribes used chariots.

The legions carried a lot of items in a kind of heavy standard wagon called 'carrus clabularius', tho. As Von Rat says, they must be the responsible.

Anyway, Roman road width (8 feet standard) was regulated since very old times in the Twelve Tables laws (5th century BC).

berg417448
10-03-2006, 08:24 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by BiscuitKnight:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by berg417448:
Uh-oH! Snopes say it is false:

http://www.snopes.com/history/american/gauge.htm </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Snopes says everything is false.
![/i] </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Wrong. Spend even a few seconds on the site and you will find many things that they say are true.

Choctaw111
10-03-2006, 08:37 AM
I have always said you learn something new everyday. Thank you very much for sharing!