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sfsniper2142
12-09-2006, 10:18 PM
On Monday i begin flight school at my local airport to hopefully get my private pilot lincence. I start on monday and for the will be training for the next 4 months.


I know there is alot of real pilots that play il2 and if any of them got any tips on what to do on my first day, it will be real helpful. The program is expensive at $9000 usd and i dont want to screw it up.

Cajun76
12-09-2006, 10:35 PM
4 months from now, wear a shirt you don't like as much... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif Good luck and<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Good hunting,
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an accordian factory (http://www.musicmagicusa.com/zupanaccordions.htm) and a mime school (http://www.le-mime.com/accueil.htm). Good luck, gentlemen. - Admiral Benson Hot Shots

p1ngu666
12-09-2006, 11:15 PM
goodluck http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

not a pilot, but the best tip i can give would just try to stay as calm as you can, and be kind and friendly to everyone http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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BfHeFwMe
12-09-2006, 11:22 PM
Keep a stiff upper lip as your trapped in a burning wreck plunging earthwards. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

BfHeFwMe
12-09-2006, 11:24 PM
Oh, you said real flight school,

disregard......... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

CAF96th_Sillyak
12-09-2006, 11:34 PM
I have a few friends who have done it, some catch on faster than others but all of them say its a real blast. Relax your going to have a tonne of fun.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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Mysticpuma2003
12-10-2006, 01:00 AM
To stay on the good side of your instructor:

a) Don't ask where the fire button is on the control stick!

b) If you see another plane in your vicinity, don't refer to it as a 'Bandit'!

c) Don't practise Boom and Zoom tactics over the control tower

d) Although you are a new pilot, practicing the Hammerhead turn, would probably be described as 'showing off'!

e) It is not necessary to perform a 'Split S' manoeuvre if a Seagull appears behind you. Although it is a good tactic, it may not be appreciated on the first day!

f) Try not to ask which way 'up' is!

g) Don't ask if you can place furry dice in the cockpit

h) Have confidence in your ability, asking for the 'Last Rights' before take-off may not instil confidence in your instructor!

i) Seriously all of the above

and finally:

Relax, have fun, and imagine how good it will be to take the learner sticker off the back of the plane!

Cheers, and good luck, MP.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://www.aqqm31.dsl.pipex.com/Mysticpuma.jpg

Esel1964
12-10-2006, 01:44 AM
Good luck and have fun,M8.
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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"What we need to take control,we could use the Rat Patrol.What's that coming over the dune?...
Chasing the halftracks across the sandflats,got a nice pine box,for that desert fox,machine guns blaring,and Arabs staring wondering why,the Westerners are there.It's the same old story,and it'll happen again."

slipBall
12-10-2006, 02:33 AM
Originally posted by sfsniper2142:
On Monday i begin flight school at my local airport to hopefully get my private pilot lincence. I start on monday and for the will be training for the next 4 months.


I know there is alot of real pilots that play il2 and if any of them got any tips on what to do on my first day, it will be real helpful. The program is expensive at $9000 usd and i dont want to screw it up.


"got any tips on what to do on my first day"

listen very closely, if you don't fully understand something your instructor says...then ask for explanation...good luck<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f394/SlipBall/orders.jpg

Yskonyn23
12-10-2006, 04:08 AM
Ah memories... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

I remember my very first lesson.
It was in a Cessna 150.

What we did:
-Takeoff (more or less by the instructor, at least he pretended I was flying, but he 'augmented my inputs' http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif).
-Leave the circuit and go to a so called 'low flying area' to get the feel of the a/c.
Do some turns, climb, descent, different power settings. You know, fool around a bit.
-Return to the airfield and do 2 circuits to get familiarized with the traffic pattern.
First landing by the instructor, second landing by me, again 'augmented' http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

It was a real blast and as I did not have any experience with gliders the feeling that I controlled an a i r c r a f t was magnificent!!

Some tips.
-Don't worry about rules, procedures and a/c limitations too much on your first flight.
Much will come and hit you (hopefully not literally http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif) so enjoy the aircraft. You instructor will guide you, so don't worry too much about the technical bits yet.

-After lesson one go and practise all the procedures in the aircraft you will need to do in the next lesson (if you received some kind of lesson plan).
Run through checklists you need to do (don't worry not all of course, not just yet) and practise them 'dry' on a chair at home.
Maybe a printout of the cockpit layout might help. Practising the flow and touching the items you need to operate help tremendously in your training and awareness in the cockpit.

But that might be a bit too far ahead already!
Main thing: ENJOY!

If you want more advise or have questions feel free to PM me.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Yskonyn -
"Pilots don't die, they just fly away."

fighter_966
12-10-2006, 05:27 AM
Follow your squadron leader all times ..if you
are number two... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

strider1
12-10-2006, 08:58 AM
Great times ahead, m8! Read your groundschool materials, manual for the aircraft you'll be training in, local chart for your airport (never leave the ground without a chart---you'll see why in short order!), Learn essential terms such as nose-up, nose-down, etc.Be gentle but firm with the controls. Relax and have fun! Take a camera or have someone come with a camcorder. You'll do great!! Cheers and best regards! Strider1<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Macabre doesn't begin to describe ME!!!--Som Assembly Required... http://i113.photobucket.com/albums/n206/strider_07/GotHimOnTheRunMtnsA.jpg

MLudner
12-10-2006, 09:17 AM
Until I finally successfully hovered an R-22 in my 10th - and final, as it turned out - flight hour every time my flight time was up I had a back-ache because I was tensed-up as result of my inability to accomplish that first test of a rotor wing pilot.

Relax (but you won't http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif.

Don't over-control (but you will http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif).

Don't fly into power lines and telephone lines, this is bad and annoys flight instructors to no end.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

She Was Like A Bearded Rainbow, As You Said, drinking a Spoonful of a Strange Brew as she screamed "I Feel Free" while she basked in the Sunshine Of Your Love in her White Room at the Crossroads dreaming Tales Of Brave Ulysses during a Blue Condition with her Toad thinking she should Take It Back.

On Hyperlobby: 334th_PROXIMVS

Warrington_Wolf
12-10-2006, 11:10 AM
I'm hoping to start flying lessons in 2007 now Ive decided which flying school to use. I got a trial lesson for my birthday last year and after that I've decided to take up flying because it really was a blast.
We flew over my home town and flew "down my street", I could pinpoint my house and all the places I knew (including my place of work, how I wished I was in a fully loaded Stuka).
On my first lesson I was so tense that I was holding the yoke so tight that my knuckes turned white and as such I was over controlling quite a bit, if I had relaxed like most people on this forum had advised I would have had better control of the aircraft.

As most have here have said already, flying really is a great experience.

Good luck mate, happy flying http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Panic on the streets of London
Panic on the streets of Birmingham
I wonder to myself
Could life ever be sane again

JG14_Josf
12-10-2006, 11:45 AM
listen very closely, if you don't fully understand something your instructor says...then ask for explanation...good luck

I think the above advice is extremely important.

lindyman
12-10-2006, 03:09 PM
Enjoy. You won't regret it. Flying for real is both familiar with, and very different from, flying in a sim.

If you want to impress the instructor, avoid "steering" with the yoke when on the ground. ;-) (seriously, everybody does it in the beginning, even though we know we are to use our feet.)

No real tips, just be serious about paying attention to your instructor and your plane. And especially pay attention to the theory. Meteorology may not be your most fun topic, but learning it is a must, and it might save your life some day.
_
/Bjorn

VFA-195 Snacky
12-10-2006, 05:01 PM
Pull back and the houses get smaller, keep pulling and the houses get bigger.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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M2morris
12-11-2006, 11:36 AM
This is a shot in the dark, but if you are, or were an 18 series than you should have no problem with doing alot of stall-practice hence you may see the ground come up at you once in a while. As a fellow sf soldier I became quite used to seeing the ground come up toward me, but anyway, they will stall-practice you to death. Good luck and have fun.
If it was me I would just go for my day-time sport license first.

lindyman
12-11-2006, 03:19 PM
So, how was it? We all expect a full report. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
_
/Bjorn

erco415
12-12-2006, 10:10 AM
A few thoughts for you...

1. You are about to do something entirely foriegn to almost anything else you've ever done, do not let this cause you to take leave of your good sense. The airplane is just a machine and it will fly quite well without any help from you. Your job is to tell it where to go and how to go. Relax and drink in what you are experiencing. You will probably be quite excited, but do what you can to keep the doors of perception open.

2. Do not allow yourself to be distracted by the instrument panel. You can do everything that you need to do by sight (look at the nose, wingtips, and the horizon) and sound (listen to the engine, the sound of the airflow at different speeds). The instruments are only there to tell you how (high, speed, heading) you are doing. It will be a few flights before you know what you're looking for, but it will come. I would often cover every instrument in the panel to demonstrate this to students, and to break them of panel fixation, and we would do every maneuver in the syllabus without trouble.

3. Remember that you are the customer as well as the student. Get your money's worth! As an instructor I expected that a student arrive for their lesson on time and prepared for the lesson. The student could expect the same from me and you should from your instuctor. Now obviously, things happen, and when they do a phone call is the least anyone can do.
If you find that your instructor is a poor fit (personality, teaching style, etc) don't be shy about asking to fly with someone else. I tried to figure out chandelles for about 5 hours worth of lessons. When my instructor went on vacation I flew with another guy and got it perfectly in a half-hour. I switched instructors and never looked back. I liked the first guy, and he was a good instructor, but he didn't teach me effectively. (Flying with different instructors from time to time is a good idea anyway, everyone's got their own tricks to show you.)
If you find that you get stuck on something, and you're making your best effort to understand/learn, don't let your instructor tell you that you're the problem. His/her job is to teach you, and if he/she cannot do that then they ought to find out who can. I inherited one student (who had been passed down at least twice by the time I got there) and finally got him to solo at 80 hours or so. I never could get him ready for his practical test, though he was as diligent and ernest as a student could hope to be. I referred him to another instructor at another flight school and he did eventually get his license. I don't have any idea what I didn't do right, and I asked, neither does my former student.
Now, I say this with some caution, because the wrong kind of personality will look to blame anyone but themselves for failure to succeed. Yes, your instructor knows a bit more about this flying thing than you do, and yes, he has been trained to evaluate student performance, just don't let one person shoot down your ambitions. And for Heaven's sake, don't let yourself be abused by your instructor - you deserve the same amount of respect in the cockpit as anywhere else. (Most of the instructors I know are pretty good eggs, but it deserves to be noted that there are a few stinkers out there).

4. Fingers give you all of the control and -generally speaking- strength you need to control the aircraft. Try not to be an Ahhhnuld- flying with the big muscles in your upper arms.

5. And before I get entirely too long-winded, HAVE FUN! FLYING IS GREAT!

Happy Landings!
erco
P.S. Don't be afraid of the ground...<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i278/ercos-hangar/fokker_now.jpg

MLudner
12-12-2006, 10:41 AM
Do NOT follow Rule #2 under IFR (Instrument Flight Rules, which is when visibility is poor to blind) conditions. If you do you'll end just like JFK Jr.

In IFR don't look out of the plane much and pay close attention to your instruments, your senses aren't designed for a 3D environment and get easily confused when you can't see the horizon.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

She Was Like A Bearded Rainbow, As You Said, drinking a Spoonful of a Strange Brew as she screamed "I Feel Free" while she basked in the Sunshine Of Your Love in her White Room at the Crossroads dreaming Tales Of Brave Ulysses during a Blue Condition with her Toad thinking she should Take It Back.

On Hyperlobby: 334th_PROXIMVS

lindyman
12-12-2006, 10:58 AM
Doesn't have to be IFR to require following the artificial horizon. I've been over open water in haze, and although visibility was good, I had no clear horizon, and found myself banking right as soon as I left the horizon gyro.

With that said, it's still true that you really don't need the instruments that much in normal flight. In the traffic pattern, keep a very keen eye on the air speed indicator. Otherwise, a glance at the altimeter now and then, and the compass and/or directional gyro, and the occational engine status scan. The rest is through the windows, your body and your ears.

Still waiting for that 1st flight report http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
_
/Bjorn

Maj.Kaos
12-12-2006, 01:00 PM
erco415 has a very good point....choose your instructor! Everyone has different styles of teaching and learning, finding the match is very important. I went through four instructor during my PPL, but only one during my Instrument.

Somewhat fortunately, my first instructor was bit of a goofball. Taught me some unorthodox procedures, which I had to unlearn later, but he also taught me to have fun with the plane and not be afraid of making a "small" mistake. We broke a lot of regulations, doing spins, rolls, loops, zero gravity floating objects about the cabin. He'd climb into the back of the C152 during flight (he was at least 6'6") to demonstrate how shifting center of gravity affected handling. We'd do inverted flat spins, looking out the top windows (Aerobat 152) and watch the earth spin "above" us. Maybe he was having fun on my dollar, but so was I.

Other instructors were strict, humorless, and no fun. One wouldn't give me controls even though I had 20 hours solo time. He was fired after one flight.

Respect the plane, respect physics, respect the weather. Don't trust your gauges so much. I nearly ran out of fuel over the mountains, watched both the fuel gauge suddenly drop from 3/4 full to 1/16 full after 45 minutes of flight. The rental a/c had been brought in late by previous pilot, who told me he had full tanks and only 1 hour of flight time in it. The fuel truck was busy, I was late, so I assumed I had four hours fuel left to fly two hours' distance, and I didn't check the tanks myself. I sweated the rest of that flight, diverting to the nearest airfield, throttling down, leaning the mixture as much as possible, coasting down a canyon's air current while constantly looking for an emergency landing area if needed. It was a great flight!

My, how I ramble on....

Good luck, and even though you're not flying a combat sim, still check your six! A Canadian Air Force trainer nearly chewed me in half during approach when he mistook my clearance for his! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

erco415
12-12-2006, 05:14 PM
Originally posted by MLudner:
Do NOT follow Rule #2 under IFR (Instrument Flight Rules, which is when visibility is poor to blind) conditions. If you do you'll end just like JFK Jr.

In IFR don't look out of the plane much and pay close attention to your instruments, your senses aren't designed for a 3D environment and get easily confused when you can't see the horizon.

Thanks MLudner and Lindyman! I had thought to include just what you guys mentioned but ended up leaving it out (inadvertenly). I was concentrating instead on what I would show a new student on the first few flights. I've found that the classic flight instrument presentation is a bit too abstract to be easily grasped/interpreted in those first few hectic flights. Concentrating instead on the pitch/roll attitude and power that gives the desired results -visually- gives a frame of reference to fit the instrument indications into. Of course, the modern method of instructing emphasises instrument flying from the beginning and I roundly second you guys- when visual cues are undependable you must ignore all else BUT the instrument indications.

A couple of other thoughts:
Generally speaking, if you can't be right on,
High is better than low,
Fast is better than slow,
And it's better to undershoot than overshoot the turn to final.

Thanks again!
erco<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i278/ercos-hangar/fokker_now.jpg

MLudner
12-12-2006, 05:53 PM
S, erco. Just trying to make myself useful. I have very little stick time myself - all of 10 Hours, as I mentioned - but that was something I well remember from my time in Flight School and from flight sim experience. I once crashed a P-51D in Jane's WWII fighters while flying a mission one foggy night. I flew by instruments until I got above the fog, then I made the mistake of using my eyes. I still could not see the horizon, and that was the key. Unlike this game Jane's had the dive wail sound effect modelled in. I think I'm flying straight and level when I start to hear that sound. I look down at the artificial horizon and I contorted until my head was almost upside down as I tried to figure out what the AH was telling me. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif I then realized I was in an inverted dive! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif I used rudder to to get it right side up, but I couldn't pull out of the dive.

BOOM! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

That poor farm house never saw it coming. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

She Was Like A Bearded Rainbow, As You Said, drinking a Spoonful of a Strange Brew as she screamed "I Feel Free" while she basked in the Sunshine Of Your Love in her White Room at the Crossroads dreaming Tales Of Brave Ulysses during a Blue Condition with her Toad thinking she should Take It Back.

On Hyperlobby: 334th_PROXIMVS

JamesBlonde888
12-12-2006, 06:14 PM
My best tip for you mate.

Leave your ego at home.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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Yskonyn23
12-13-2006, 03:59 AM
Originally posted by Maj.Kaos:
I nearly ran out of fuel over the mountains, watched both the fuel gauge suddenly drop from 3/4 full to 1/16 full after 45 minutes of flight. The rental a/c had been brought in late by previous pilot, who told me he had full tanks and only 1 hour of flight time in it. The fuel truck was busy, I was late, so I assumed I had four hours fuel left to fly two hours' distance, and I didn't check the tanks myself. I sweated the rest of that flight, diverting to the nearest airfield, throttling down, leaning the mixture as much as possible, coasting down a canyon's air current while constantly looking for an emergency landing area if needed. It was a great flight!


Another classic quote to throw in then:
"Never ASSUME, because you'll make an *** out of U and ME."

Always check stuff yourself when you take over an aircraft from someone. And I don't see why that would end up in a 'great flight'.
A ****up can turn from a 'great flight' into a tragidy on a whim.
As said before, leave your ego at home. That's definately true in aviation (but uncommonly seen however, haha!) http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

It is good advice though, to our rookie. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

BTW Never trust your fuel indicators in most small aircraft. Just look at them to see if they are full or less than full. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif They are as inaccurate as my grandpa throwing darts on a perfectly still board.
Always check your tanks visually before flight and calculate your endurance on that.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Yskonyn -
"Pilots don't die, they just fly away."

Mysticpuma2003
12-14-2006, 03:52 AM
Just giving this a bump from the depths. Cheers, MP.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://www.aqqm31.dsl.pipex.com/Mysticpuma.jpg

MOH_Hirth
12-14-2006, 09:35 PM
Spend money with trackIR4, intel e-6600 processor, GF7950gt, good computer is essential.

sfsniper2142
12-14-2006, 09:59 PM
I havent begin to fly just yet. The 2 flight instructors for the past 4 days are just showing and teaching me were everything is and all the instruments. Ill be flying a Cessna 150 then moving to a Cessna 172 later in the course.


Today she took me up over lake Michigan and showed me around the plane and then we landed an 45min later. It was my first time being in such a small plane that it felt a little scary but i got used to it.

karost
12-15-2006, 01:00 AM
sfsniper2142, this is a good topic ... I have no plan to fly yet, but happy to read all this posts.

hope you'll share your story after become a real pilot http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Oh.. I like this video very much , it's about first solo http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ub_002tQ3Zw

S!

IronDuke08
12-15-2006, 02:44 AM
I'm a student pilot in the middle of check-ride prep with about 32 hours in C172SP/Nav III with Garmin G1000... and another 24 in older C172R/S with the "six pack." I would advise anyone if at all possible to train in a G1000, the difference in SA and safety is unbelievable, and it will definitely allow for easier transitions to higher performance aircraft later...the list of GA aircraft with G1000s is getting longer by the month it seems...if not your Private training then perhaps your instrument rating...btw Garmin sells an G1000 sim for $4.00 or so on their website, so you can become familiar with it without being on billable time, which is key...

Don't worry about your ego, your first landing will fix that...it was so humbling for me...my biggest issue was actually being willing to put control imputs onto the plane...I'd been on flightsims my entire life, and can do "anything" in one of them, but that first time putting the C172 in a 35 deg. bank and having to pull back on the yoke to maintain altitude, pulling "real" Gs (probably only like 1.8)...that knocked my socks off a bit haha...flares are tricky at first too, but these things come rather quickly with experience...

Also make sure that you do some real training in Class C airspace dealing with ATC, and I'd try to get instrument rated ASAP, just for safety's sake...

The only other thing I'd recommend is the investment in some noise canceling headsets...i remember the first time I flew with them and the reduction in fatigue is dramatic, which, again is a big safety issue for me...

Good luck, it's a real blast!

Yskonyn23
12-15-2006, 03:03 AM
IronDuke08, funny you state that it was such an obvious difference between flightsimming and real piloting.
I had the same experience. Feeling the forces and feeling the aircraft is something a flightsim can never achieve, not even a Level-D Full Flightsim (and I speak out of experience).

And it does put you off a bit at first. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
It's also true in reverse, though.
I now yank my joystick around a lot less because you don't do that in the real plane either. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Yskonyn -
"Pilots don't die, they just fly away."

fighter_966
12-15-2006, 04:25 AM
Never use word uber or porked about plane you fly

IronDuke08
12-15-2006, 04:41 AM
Yskonyn23...You're absolutely right...I'm so much smoother in Il-2 now...you always needed to be much smoother in il-2 than in other sims anyway, but even more so now...I also think it's fun flying the pattern in a tricycle gear plane in il-2 like the Do-335...it's amazing how good the sim landings get after you've learned how it's done in the real thing!!

erco415
12-15-2006, 02:57 PM
Originally posted by sfsniper2142:
I havent begin to fly just yet. The 2 flight instructors for the past 4 days are just showing and teaching me were everything is and all the instruments. Ill be flying a Cessna 150 then moving to a Cessna 172 later in the course.


Today she took me up over lake Michigan and showed me around the plane and then we landed an 45min later. It was my first time being in such a small plane that it felt a little scary but i got used to it.

Where are you learning to fly? I did my private at Chaplin Aviation (now defunct) and worked line crew for Magnus Aviation at SBM, that is, Sheboygan WI. Man the first time I didn't have the lake to stand for East I was soooo turned around!<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i278/ercos-hangar/fokker_now.jpg

slo_1_2_3
12-16-2006, 12:04 AM
I have advice, Don't forget it's not a sim, no refly button<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

You can run, but you'll only die tired... . . . .:
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Feathered_IV
12-16-2006, 12:37 AM
Don't tell them you came here for help http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/10.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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"Intelligent, normally observant and answered all questions freely. He was arrogant and proud to be a pilot. Fellow prisoners in hospital consider him mentally unstable."

Mysticpuma2003
12-16-2006, 12:43 AM
Probably thee last bump I'll give it....something for the weekend?<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://www.aqqm31.dsl.pipex.com/Mysticpuma.jpg

Treetop64
12-16-2006, 01:10 AM
Originally posted by Yskonyn23:
BTW Never trust your fuel indicators in most small aircraft. Just look at them to see if they are full or less than full. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif They are as inaccurate as my grandpa throwing darts on a perfectly still board.
Always check your tanks visually before flight and calculate your endurance on that.

The single-engine Cessna fuel guages are notoriously unreliable. May as well not even have them. Just dip the tanks and keep an eye on the stopwatch!<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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"It breaks my heart, but I am almost certain that raaaid will get the Nobel Prize in physics before we get the Avenger in PF."
-- Zeus-cat
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"I take off like an epileptic squirrel being attacked by bees. I fly with the equivalant grace of a circus elephant with a compressed airhose shoved up my ***, and to add icing to the cake that is the disgraceful paroxysm of my uncoordinated spasmodic ballet: I have yet to land without flipping the plane over on its canopy. How's that for style?" -- Sobriquet