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View Full Version : OT - Reasons not to Fly an Ultralight!



RedToo
12-01-2005, 04:17 PM
http://www.flurl.com/uploaded/Ultralight_Crash_6402.html

Very painful.

RedToo.

danjama
12-01-2005, 04:47 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

SkyChimp
12-01-2005, 05:25 PM
Originally posted by danjama:
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

danjama
12-01-2005, 05:28 PM
Originally posted by SkyChimp:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by danjama:
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

problem? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/mockface.gif

Owlsphone
12-01-2005, 06:05 PM
OUCH. Did he cut the engine or did it shut off on its own?

Unknown-Pilot
12-01-2005, 06:12 PM
If somebody getting injured is reason to not do something, then we should never do anything at all.

They really ought to have shown what kind it was too. He sank like a rock as soon as the engine cut, which is strange, to say the least. That's not going to happen to every ultralight.

-HH- Beebop
12-01-2005, 06:18 PM
Originally posted by danjama:
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Ummm, what's so funny about all those broken and dislocated bones and a punctured lung? Sounds like he's lucky to be alive. Not a laughing matter in my book.


On another tack, was he being towed? I heard the tiny engine but it looked like there was a strap tied to the airframe. I also thought I saw a light plane shadow. What gives here? Any idea?

berg417448
12-01-2005, 06:27 PM
I think what looks like a strap is part of his own aircraft's rigging angling down from the wing past the camera. The shadow is likely his own.

T_O_A_D
12-01-2005, 06:41 PM
Yeh shadow was his, it looks like a High wing type with a normal so to speak tail.

Sort of like this one.
http://www.quicksilverultralight.com/images/for_sale/fo...d_sport_II_large.jpg (http://www.quicksilverultralight.com/images/for_sale/for_sale_red_sport_II_large.jpg)

I wonder why it did that, too bad they didn't include more info.

F19_Orheim
12-01-2005, 06:41 PM
terrible.. made me sickhttp://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif
lucky he came out of it alive...

CaptJodan
12-01-2005, 07:17 PM
Very disturbing really. Honestly I wouldn't consider that a laughing matter, but to each his own I guess. Those are some pretty major medical bills he had to deal with.

On the flip side, when everthing is working right, that's a pretty great view he has.

DrHerb
12-01-2005, 07:29 PM
guess he revoked his recreational liscense after that one

Estocade85
12-01-2005, 07:31 PM
Surprisingly, I wasn't shocked at all, I'd even say I'm with Danjama on this one... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Anyway, WTH isn't he wearing protecting gear? A cockpit open like that, I would be unconfortable flying without some kind of "safety backup". And FFS dude get some biker clothes at least...flying half naked in bermudas http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif

Anyways, flying is a risky business, just like life itself. If it wasn't, it wouldn't be as exciting. "If you ain't worth a laugh you ain't worth a d@mn"

***EDIT***

Noticed he doesn't even have his visor down, plus when he knows he's going down he doesn't even try to protect himself! It's like...get a clue YOUR GOING DOWN! Lower your visor, stop holding that now-useless rod with your left arm, put your head down and put your arms in front of your chest... Better to have broken forearms than broken ribs and punctured lungs.

Waldo.Pepper
12-01-2005, 07:47 PM
I didn't much care for the way the rudimentary instrument cluster trapped his legs. THAT looks like a terrible design, guaranteed to damage his legs on a rough landing even.

I must admit when it got to ... punctured lung I snikered a bit. The list seemed so over the top that it got kind of amusing.

james_ander
12-01-2005, 08:12 PM
I must admit when it got to ... punctured lung I snikered a bit. The list seemed so over the top that it got kind of amusing.

Yes, that's a real scream, the broken vertebrae and pelvis was good for a few yucks too.

' the hell's wrong with you?

Lemky
12-01-2005, 08:19 PM
That young man did really good,just the wrong place at the wrong time.He was climbing out and was starting his turn when the engine quit.Did what he had to do,forget the turn and glide striat ahead.His airspeed looks to be low,may have stalled the ultralight.Hard to say but he flew it the way you have to fly with an engine out on take off.
This can happen anytime on take off no matter what you are flying.From a ultralight to a jet.
Hoping he recovers fine and gets back in to flying agian, Cheers

WTE_Ibis
12-01-2005, 08:56 PM
I've had 5 smashed ribs and a punctured lung and can guarantee he wasn't laughing for some time. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif


.

polak5
12-02-2005, 01:42 AM
when i saw the name of the topic i wondeered how the hell u fly a cigarette.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Anyway laughing at other people misuries is no laughing matter especially not like that...

Unless its the video of Castro falling down those stairs...

ploughman
12-02-2005, 01:54 AM
There you go, 0 to life changing event in, ooh, maybe 3 seconds. Live everyday like it's your last, one day you'll be right.

Stoyanov
12-02-2005, 02:44 AM
ouch...

Do less, live longer http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Viper2005_
12-02-2005, 03:22 AM
Nothing wrong with flying an ultralight. The problem is making bad decisions.

This video has been around for a while, and somewhere out there used to be a page on which the pilot talks about it...

Anyway

i) Maintainance - engines generally don't fail if they're given appropriate care and feeding. In this case the fuel system failed to behave itself.

ii) Pilot error -

A) He had a lot of runway ahead of him - why did he turn? Ultralights generally glide like bricks, and climb rather close to their stall speed. This is bad medicine at low altitude unless you've got somewhere to put the aircraft when the engine quits. Always leave yourself a way out.

B) He didn't react correctly to the failure. You can see him hauling back on the stick the whole way down. He stalls the aircraft almost immediately after the failure, and thereafter is simply along for the ride. Had he not stalled, perhaps he might have had some options, despite the poor descision to head towards trees at such low altitude.

This accident need not have happened. The engine failure was preventable. Even after the engine failure, the crash itself was avoidable.

Aeroplanes are not inherently dangerous, but they are remarkably unforgiving.

Pirschjaeger
12-02-2005, 04:53 AM
When I saw the start of the video and what he was wearing, I cringed before the engine failure. It also seems he paniced and froze up. He didn't have much time to react either.

It's not as bad as the guy who bought a helicopter and decided to teach himself how to fly. That was really stupid.

Fritz

VonKlugermon
12-02-2005, 07:51 AM
I think about the old adage about ultra-lights:

"Only fly as high as you want to fall"

He was lucky!

Willy

Pirschjaeger
12-02-2005, 08:52 AM
Originally posted by VonKlugermon:
I think about the old adage about ultra-lights:

"Only fly as high as you want to fall"

He was lucky!

Willy

I often thought it would be nice to have an ultralite, but this summer when I was in Germany, I saw a guy flying a parachute with a small gas engine strapped to his back. I thought that was somewhat safer than an ultralite. If the engine stops, maybe he could unstrap it, lowering his weight, and just float to the ground.

Fritz

Pirschjaeger
12-02-2005, 09:08 AM
RedToo, I don't mean to hi-jack your thread, but you guys gotta take a look at this video. It's from the same site your posted.

http://www.flurl.com/uploaded/Ruuuuuuuun_8026.html

You gotta admit, this one is kinda funny. I doubt anyone was seriously injured. This one's for Danjama. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Fritz

ddsflyer
12-02-2005, 10:43 AM
I just missed hitting one of these at 5500 feet over Lake Elsinor, California once. What he was doing at 5500' in controlled airspace I will never know. With no need for a pilot's licence to fly one, many of the pilots of these things don't have a clue about the airspcae regulations they are violating or the danger they are in.

MLudner
12-02-2005, 11:37 AM
Originally posted by Ploughman:
There you go, 0 to life changing event in, ooh, maybe 3 seconds. Live everyday like it's your last, one day you'll be right.


Precisely. The uncertainty principle. That's why I don't worry about smoking much; we've all got it coming and you never know how long you have. Fear, Mr. Henry correctly observed, is the passion of slaves. I have already come within millimeters of death more than once: I've had bullets go right past my nose and right over my head, an idiot from Ecuador nearly killed me in act of insane stupidity that still staggers and infuriates me to this day when I think about it. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif
Such is life; it comes with no guarantees of anything.

MLudner
12-02-2005, 11:49 AM
Originally posted by Viper2005_:
Nothing wrong with flying an ultralight. The problem is making bad decisions.

This video has been around for a while, and somewhere out there used to be a page on which the pilot talks about it...

Anyway

i) Maintainance - engines generally don't fail if they're given appropriate care and feeding. In this case the fuel system failed to behave itself.

ii) Pilot error -

A) He had a lot of runway ahead of him - why did he turn? Ultralights generally glide like bricks, and climb rather close to their stall speed. This is bad medicine at low altitude unless you've got somewhere to put the aircraft when the engine quits. Always leave yourself a way out.

B) He didn't react correctly to the failure. You can see him hauling back on the stick the whole way down. He stalls the aircraft almost immediately after the failure, and thereafter is simply along for the ride. Had he not stalled, perhaps he might have had some options, despite the poor descision to head towards trees at such low altitude.

This accident need not have happened. The engine failure was preventable. Even after the engine failure, the crash itself was avoidable.

Aeroplanes are not inherently dangerous, but they are remarkably unforgiving.

I agree entirely. I have some flight training and I noted all of those things when I watched that. He did stall it and did not have to, but, really, it's easy to panic when the unexpected happens and you have only a second or less to make the right decisions. You have to practice until the right decisions become instinctive. You have to drill them into your subconscious mind by thinking about it until it is second nature. Obviously, he had not done that.

p-11.cAce
12-02-2005, 12:02 PM
I always hate when this kind of topic comes up as everyone arm-chair QB's it to death and then launches into the "ultralight death trap" mode. I used to live near Lookout Mountain Flight Park near Chattanooga and flew hang gliders and ultralights there for years. Yes we had some accidents but so did the bicyclist who ride in that area and the hikers and kayakers in nearby Cloudland Canyon. Now that I'm "grown up" and flying sailplanes anytime I bring up flying HG my friends are always saying **** like "man you were lucky to survive!". Whatever - glider pilots get killed all the time too. I would like to think I'd never do what this guy did and paint myself into a corner - a few extra feet and he could have banked left and tried to land on the road; 100 extra feet and he could have 180'd back around to that truck parking lot or maybe even the field he took off from - however I've caught myself low and slow on approach while distracted by something stupid and God knows I've had my share of land outs after pushing too hard in poor conditions.

Lethal_Hobo
12-02-2005, 01:36 PM
Yeah.. people die during sex.. and nobody's giving that up anytime soon because of it

BSS_Goat
12-02-2005, 01:44 PM
Originally posted by Lethal_Hobo:
Yeah.. people die during sex.. and nobody's giving that up anytime soon because of it

Nope, I got married and gave that up.... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif

danjama
12-02-2005, 01:45 PM
Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
RedToo, I don't mean to hi-jack your thread, but you guys gotta take a look at this video. It's from the same site your posted.

http://www.flurl.com/uploaded/Ruuuuuuuun_8026.html

You gotta admit, this one is kinda funny. I doubt anyone was seriously injured. This one's for Danjama. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Fritz

Ouch http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif That thump looks too painful!

Tully__
12-02-2005, 04:33 PM
Originally posted by Lemky:
That young man did really good,just the wrong place at the wrong time.He was climbing out and was starting his turn when the engine quit.Did what he had to do,forget the turn and glide striat ahead.His airspeed looks to be low,may have stalled the ultralight.Hard to say but he flew it the way you have to fly with an engine out on take off.
This can happen anytime on take off no matter what you are flying.From a ultralight to a jet.
Hoping he recovers fine and gets back in to flying agian, Cheers


Originally posted by Viper2005_
Nothing wrong with flying an ultralight. The problem is making bad decisions.

This video has been around for a while, and somewhere out there used to be a page on which the pilot talks about it...

Anyway

i) Maintainance - engines generally don't fail if they're given appropriate care and feeding. In this case the fuel system failed to behave itself.

ii) Pilot error -

A) He had a lot of runway ahead of him - why did he turn? Ultralights generally glide like bricks, and climb rather close to their stall speed. This is bad medicine at low altitude unless you've got somewhere to put the aircraft when the engine quits. Always leave yourself a way out.

B) He didn't react correctly to the failure. You can see him hauling back on the stick the whole way down. He stalls the aircraft almost immediately after the failure, and thereafter is simply along for the ride. Had he not stalled, perhaps he might have had some options, despite the poor descision to head towards trees at such low altitude.

This accident need not have happened. The engine failure was preventable. Even after the engine failure, the crash itself was avoidable.

I'm with Viper & MLudner... several owner/pilot errors caused this. Watch the controls, he did nearly everything wrong.

Ultralights can be a very safe and enjoyable pastime when approached correctly, but it would seem there was not nearly enough practice on safety procedures in this case.

Enforcer572005
12-02-2005, 08:00 PM
My dad, a prof. pilot w/ 13000hrs+ i in everything from a T-28 to an AH-1J, broke his back in a car accident (that could be a whole nother thread). He got a condor ultralight with the rudder rigged to the stick, and after several forced landings due to a gasket being left out of the kawasaki engine, got one of those neat little parachute rescue thingys mounted on the top of the wing....small cylinder that deploys a chute in such emergencies if you want.

Never had to use it, but it seems to be an appropriate adon for such aircraft. They are prone to engine failures and weather, but arent that dangerous if handled properly.

I saw a guy in a gyrocopter violently manuvering that thing like it was a cobra, my dad (in his wheelchair) commenting "that guy is gonna dig a hole".......he climbed steeply, pulled negative G, and stalled the thing, no lift on the rotors. dove straight in from about 300m...into the runway. Somebody videotaped it.
He didnt make it. Ya gotta know what yer doin...