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View Full Version : why was the hellcat so slow?



fordfan25
11-08-2004, 12:00 AM
compaired to both the corsair and mainly the p-47? if im not wrong the jug had the same engine right? and looking at it, it does not look any more arodinamic or slick than the hellcat. in fact it looks a good bit biger and bulkier. the corsair i can kinda see. it does look a lot thiner. could anyone in the know explain why? and i dont mean in the game im talking IRL http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Fliger747
11-08-2004, 12:44 AM
Power vrs drag: Comes in three basic forms, induced drag (lift) form drag (fuselage) and cooling drag. Where the Hellcat compromise came out here was induced drag, from a big wing, biggest of any WWII single engine fighter. Till the need for Kamakaze interception came about, the F6F was fast enough, easy to fly and maintain and reasonably manuverable.

Higher wing loading will allow more speed, but reduce manuverability, generally.

XyZspineZyX
11-08-2004, 03:37 AM
Fliger explained it pretty well as I understand it. Another way to say it is: An airframe designed for high lift will generally create more drag and so it's max speed is lower. High _lift_ design (Hellcat, Zero) is generally countrary to high _speed_ design (P-51).

Lift causes drag ... that principle essentially comes from the law of conservation of energy.

fordfan25
11-08-2004, 11:12 AM
what are the advantages of the hellcats high lift wings?

xanty
11-08-2004, 11:14 AM
great turning, good maneubravility, good landing on carriers... :-)

fordfan25
11-08-2004, 11:19 AM
O ok gatcha. thanks every one that helped.

Fliger747
11-08-2004, 11:50 AM
The F4U was put out for design before the war, before there was an appreciation for the type of aircraft it would face. The Hellcat, if not designed specifically after capture of Koga's Zero (as often wrongly stated) was designed with an eye to overcoming the Wildcats shortcomings in combat and retaining it's virtues. The resultant was a rugged, effective fighter that could be flown well by the thousands of AVCAD's coming out of the training pipeline.