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View Full Version : Some noob-problems i'm sure....



Abe_Lenstra
04-30-2008, 08:19 AM
..... but it's really driving me up the wall.

I have the Sturmovik 1946 version patched up to 4.08m.

But, much like the Sturmovik forgotten battles + AEP etc. etc. i have huge difficulty getting some planes of the ground. Especially the Buffalo and the KI27. For some reason, the steer rediculously to the left when i want to take off. Other planes take off and fly fine but several planes just seem to have that weird habit.

This is very annoying since it bars me from playing several cool campaigns i want to play like the Dutch Campaign by Joppe and the Dutch Singapore campaign that comes with the standard game.

Stangely enough, when i do a quick mission with these planes they fly and land normally yet when i use 'em in a campaign setting with the taking off and all that they are unmanageble.

Does anybody else have this type of problems and is there anything that can be done about it?

Also: How can i my gunsight clear with the KI27? It's blacked out nad i've tried everything to get it open............ http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

berg417448
04-30-2008, 08:28 AM
Make sure that you lock the tailwheel prior to takeoff in all aircraft.It will reduce the tendency to swing.

Ctrl+D will open the gunsight cover.

OD_
04-30-2008, 08:29 AM
Ctrl+D for the gunsight issue...don't know what you can do with the take off except more right rudder and increase power slwly rather than pushing it to full throttle too quickly.

BrewsterPilot
04-30-2008, 08:35 AM
When it comes to the Brewster Buffalo it is amazingly sensitive to torque and needs to be trimmed constantly.
My tip is to lock the tailwheel and compensate strongly to the right while taking off (I often use full right rudder and ailerons). Once your airborne and the gear & flaps are retracted you can start trimming for level flight.
Always use the runway while taking off in it, as the gear is very fragile and it has a nasty tendency to bounce.

gizmo60
04-30-2008, 10:15 AM
Also, hitting the brake while the rudder is turned will operate the wheel brake on that side only.

A while back I had great trouble with a Tempest campaign where the plane would always spawn with the tailwheel at 90 degrees.
I had written off over 20 planes by the 2nd mission before I discovered how the brakes work.

After a while taking off in almost any plane becomes second nature so keep practicing, it'll come.

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Phobia337
04-30-2008, 10:29 AM
Originally posted by BrewsterPilot:
When it comes to the Brewster Buffalo it is amazingly sensitive to torque and needs to be trimmed constantly.
My tip is to lock the tailwheel and compensate strongly to the right while taking off (I often use full right rudder and ailerons). Once your airborne and the gear & flaps are retracted you can start trimming for level flight.
Always use the runway while taking off in it, as the gear is very fragile and it has a nasty tendency to bounce.
Yea same as brewster said. Lock your tail wheel, apply full right rudder and as you begin to pick up speed and tail is about to come off, slowly release right rudder pressure. If you don't you will over compensate and the nose you shoot sharply to the right as soon as the tail gets off the ground.

Just practice man, it gets easier the more you do it.

DKoor
04-30-2008, 01:25 PM
http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o125/DKoor/il2/IL-2-Total-Newbie-Start-FAQ.jpg

Lurch1962
04-30-2008, 04:37 PM
The difference in difficulty you experience in take-off between, say, QMB generated flights and campaigns might be due to the different difficulty settings. Remember, whenever starting a Campaign, *always* review the difficulty settings, as they are almost always different from those of a previous campaign you've played and/or the settings you've used for QMB flying.

Airmail109
04-30-2008, 04:40 PM
To take off, open throttle slowly you should have counted to 10 before the throttle is wide open. All the time you should be countering the torque with rudder.

Be gentle

M_Gunz
04-30-2008, 06:09 PM
Originally posted by Abe_Lenstra:
Especially the Buffalo and the KI27. For some reason, the steer rediculously to the left when i want to take off. Other planes take off and fly fine but several planes just seem to have that weird habit.

You may be in bad weather or it may be propwash on the tail doing it.

As above, always lock the tail wheel before you even start the engine.
Apply brakes, get the engine revved to at least 50% before releasing brakes.
Use rudder to counter the propwash.
If after your wheels leave the ground the plane rolls a but, use rudder only to stay level.

Propwash is air spiralling back from the prop. When you are very slow and the tail is on the
ground it is the worst.

There are bad weather missions with heavy crosswinds as well.

WTE_Ibis
05-01-2008, 03:10 AM
Originally posted by Aimail101:
To take off, open throttle slowly you should have counted to 10 before the throttle is wide open. All the time you should be countering the torque with rudder.

Be gentle
---------------------------------------------



As you would be with your lady.



.

Wildnoob
05-01-2008, 08:58 AM
the torque on take off is something that is relative.

me for example, like most real aircraft, I don't use flaps on take off. wat I do, is apply some elevator trim and it's enough to take off without any problem.

I found that the way the aircraft will take off will depend on how much trim I set. if I set too much, the aircraft will take of banking to the left. if not, will take off more straigth. I normally set 2 degrees on the mouse scroll bar (where is mapped my elevator trim) and it's normally enough to take off without problem.

of course, it depends on the aircraft. with the P-47, for example, it's necessary apply more, about 5 degress.

M_Gunz
05-01-2008, 01:01 PM
Originally posted by Wildnoob:
tif I set too much, the aircraft will take of banking to the left.

That's why you should be using your feet (or twisty) instead of trim.
The change comes too fast for trim.
Banking left, you need to rudder a bit to the right -- not use side stick at low speed.

A good way to develop those skills is to see how slow you can fly at full power higher up.
Some of these planes have incredibly slow full power stall (as opposed to power off = idle)
even without flaps at all (and gear up = clean) and some won't allow you to reach stall at
full power or at least I haven't even pulling up at below 180kph in a P-40B. Is it the FM
or is it real, I can't say as I've never seen P-40B data on full power stall. Not all planes
will allow back side of the level power curve flight, it may be by design as it is with some
modern GA planes.

Wildnoob
05-01-2008, 02:55 PM
M_Gunz, I think you not understand me very clearly.

I use the rudder, but even like that aircraft have tendency do bank.

DKoor
05-01-2008, 03:56 PM
There was a point in the past where I would rather make a full aileron roll instead of using rudder for even tiny bit when I get into a shooting solution... it was that bad.
Some aircraft in the game are still prone to quite weird behavior at lower/med speed considering this but nowhere near as bad like in the past.

Wildnoob
05-01-2008, 04:13 PM
apart from a P-51 in a documentary, I never see real aircraft taking off banking to the sides. all the warbirds I have see take off on videos, take off very straigth for my eyes.

M_Gunz
05-01-2008, 08:56 PM
Originally posted by Wildnoob:
M_Gunz, I think you not understand me very clearly.

I use the rudder, but even like that aircraft have tendency do bank.

Yes, as soon as the wheels leave the ground. Which needs quick attention.
That's why I don't trim rudder for takeoff, as above.
The advice ain't just for you btw.

M_Gunz
05-01-2008, 09:16 PM
Originally posted by DKoor:
Some aircraft in the game are still prone to quite weird behavior at lower/med speed considering this but nowhere near as bad like in the past.

Some are only worse than others. You can reduce and control the effect.

That's true gyroscopic precession being modeled. It's due to the spinning mass of the prop.
The more mass in blades and longer the blades and higher the rpm, the worse it should be.
Of course you can lower the rpm during the firing pass if you're not TnB fighting and lose
very little speed.

Gyroscopic precession will add a force to a yaw or pitch movement, 90 degrees to the side in
the direction of the spin. So if your pitch trim is out and you pull elevator it moves the
nose to the side as well, when you yaw with rudder it moves the nose vertically -- in proportion
to how fast you made your correction so ease the aim and apply some counter-force. With some
study of your particular plane the mystery is gone enough so you don't PIO-up your aim.

The torque on the prop vs the mass of the plane matters. A 4-blade paddle prop driven by
2000 or so HP at 3000 rpm.. well go figure. I find the Spit IX's just a bit torquey.

During takeoff we get sometimes heavy propwash, P-factor and gyro forces at the same time.
Just before landing, same thing.