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View Full Version : OT: Apollo images, all you can eat



ploughman
09-17-2006, 09:50 AM
Chances are some of you lot are moon units as well as propeller heads.

Whilst perusing the interweb the following link was brought to my attention.

LINK (http://161.115.184.211/teague/apollo/)

Over 5,000 high resolution images from the Apollo missions of the late '60s and early '70s.

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y289/mctomney/Apollo01.jpg

I really enjoyed surfing through it, I hope you do to.

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

SeaFireLIV
09-17-2006, 09:54 AM
Hmmm, well, not really...

But then again, did you know that there are more Stars in the Universe than grains of sand of every seashore on Earth?

Space is big.

Bremspropeller
09-17-2006, 10:04 AM
All pics are from Apollo 17, the last mission to visit Moon.

Warrington_Wolf
09-17-2006, 10:12 AM
Learning about space in school was one of the reasons that I became interested in aviation. I was also introduced to David Bowie's music by learning about space.

heywooood
09-17-2006, 10:13 AM
Originally posted by SeaFireLIV:
Hmmm, well, not really...

But then again, did you know that there are more Stars in the Universe than grains of sand of every seashore on Earth?

Space is big.

thats just in our scale...don't forget to go down in scale to our molecular level and upward in scale, that is to extrapolate that our universe - in our scale - may be no more than a particle of a dust mote in the next larger universe....and so on - both upward and downward in scale.

Think of all the stars there are with that in mind. How many beaches are there??

only one Earth? only one Universe? in only one Scale?....I think not.

...and we haven't even discussed the concept of 'time' yet.

ploughman
09-17-2006, 10:28 AM
Originally posted by Bremspropeller:
All pics are from Apollo 17, the last mission to visit Moon.

No.

They're from all the missions that successfully landed on the surface.

Here's one from Apollo 16. Note the mission patch.

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y289/mctomney/apollo16.jpg

Bremspropeller
09-17-2006, 10:36 AM
Okay, beats me http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

skarden
09-17-2006, 10:38 AM
Originally posted by SeaFireLIV:

But then again, did you know that there are more Stars in the Universe than grains of sand of every seashore on Earth?

Space is big.

I just bought the DVD set of space with Sam Niel(excelent set BTW),and the figure they use in that is that for everygrain of sand on the planet there is about 1 million starts in the Universe.

every grain of sand on earth x 1 million!! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

Wow kinda helps puts thing in perspective eh.
As heywood pionts out it really is FAR BEYOND what humans can really perceive as far as size goes.

Pirschjaeger
09-17-2006, 11:12 AM
Really? Hmm, that's really disappointing to me.

I took the total amount of stars and divided that by 1 million.

It seems there's a bit less sand than I previously thought. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/sadeyes.gif

I need a drink. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif

Fritz

SeaFireLIV
09-17-2006, 11:27 AM
Originally posted by heywooood:


thats just in our scale...don't forget to go down in scale to our molecular level and upward in scale, that is to extrapolate that our universe - in our scale - may be no more than a particle of a dust mote in the next larger universe....and so on - both upward and downward in scale.

Think of all the stars there are with that in mind. How many beaches are there??

only one Earth? only one Universe? in only one Scale?....I think not.

...and we haven't even discussed the concept of 'time' yet.

I see. Let me just find my brain that just exploded.

Nah. Actually, I understand, but wow, makes you realise that the more we learn, the less we know.

talking about moon landings, I`ve always found it strange that once man landed on the moon, he never took advantage of the event. I mean, people at the time expected we`d colonise it and make some use of it somehow, even if just for research like we do st the Earth Poles, but nothing.

Always saddens me to think that the only real reason we ever went up there was just to beat the Russians. Had our reasons been less inward-looking and more honest perhaps we`d have had a nice little colony on the moon and be closer to landing on Mars.

Rjel
09-17-2006, 12:19 PM
Originally posted by SeaFireLIV:

Always saddens me to think that the only real reason we ever went up there was just to beat the Russians. Had our reasons been less inward-looking and more honest perhaps we`d have had a nice little colony on the moon and be closer to landing on Mars.

I think there are more reasons than that for why further exploration wasn't done. In the early '70s America was finishing up in Vietnam, suffered through Watergate and was suffering from a major recession. Top it off by not having a dynamic leader like President Kennedy who had forward vision, it's little wonder NASA has wandered for 30+ years.

heywooood
09-17-2006, 12:26 PM
the accomplishment was ahead of its time...just goes to show you what determination is worth.

So it wasn't just to beat the russians - it was to see if, using the tools available at the time, if we could do it...we did.

Against severe odds.

We should congratulate ourselves and not diminish the accomplishment as being a 'race' against a race -

but rather as an achievement of the race of men.

Now - years later we can apply the lessons learned then and bring new technology to bear against the challenge of lunar

(and other) colonization in the name of science, advancement of knowledge and the destiny of our kind.

Pollack2006
09-17-2006, 12:28 PM
Fantastic resource, thanks for the link.

BTW, the file names e.g. "AS12-49-7198.jpg" tell you which mission they're from.

Thanks again, unfortunately the only coverage the 60's space program gets these days is the moonbat/moon-fake ****.

F6_Ace
09-17-2006, 12:37 PM
Originally posted by Rjel:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by SeaFireLIV:

Always saddens me to think that the only real reason we ever went up there was just to beat the Russians. Had our reasons been less inward-looking and more honest perhaps we`d have had a nice little colony on the moon and be closer to landing on Mars.

I think there are more reasons than that for why further exploration wasn't done. In the early '70s America was finishing up in Vietnam, suffered through Watergate and was suffering from a major recession. Top it off by not having a dynamic leader like President Kennedy who had forward vision, it's little wonder NASA has wandered for 30+ years. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

The cold war was a marvellous vehicle for advancement. Later on, though - what do you do? Colonise the moon or build more ICBMs?

heywooood
09-17-2006, 12:56 PM
the achievement outpaced technology by a wide margin...30-50 years at least...truly remarkable.

Aside from the conflict of that era - there just wasn't any way technologically to use the accomplishment.
It had less to do with Vietnam than it did with tha fact that we weren't ready, it was just too soon from the point of view of being able to sustain a colony on the moon.

Such a project is probably still a quarter of a century away technologically and logistically.

I think the motivation and determination of the people involved in Apollo caused something to happen that was really astounding.

Call it John F. Kennedys' legacy maybe...maybe one man can make a difference

SeaFireLIV
09-17-2006, 01:21 PM
Originally posted by heywooood:
the achievement outpaced technology by a wide margin...30-50 years at least...truly remarkable.

Aside from the conflict of that era - there just wasn't any way technologically to use the accomplishment.
It had less to do with Vietnam than it did with tha fact that we weren't ready, it was just too soon from the point of view of being able to sustain a colony on the moon.

Such a project is probably still a quarter of a century away technologically and logistically.

I think the motivation and determination of the people involved in Apollo caused something to happen that was really astounding.

Call it John F. Kennedys' legacy maybe...maybe one man can make a difference

Sure, i`m not doubting is as a great achievement. It was, but due to a race between 2 sides. And whatever you believe, heywooood, that`s what I think it honestly comes down to.

Now you say the project is a quarter of a century away logistically, but I wonder how far away it would`ve been if the US and USSR were still competing dispite the logistics? Of course we may have either been colonising the moon or be a radioactive desert or both, but you get my point...

ploughman
09-17-2006, 02:14 PM
This site is, er, comprehensive too.

Link to loads of Apollo images. (http://www.lpi.usra.edu/resources/apollo/)

skarden
09-18-2006, 01:59 AM
Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
Really? Hmm, that's really disappointing to me.

I took the total amount of stars and divided that by 1 million.

It seems there's a bit less sand than I previously thought. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/sadeyes.gif

Fritz

Um total stars in our galaxy? or the universe?
there actually a very big difference.

skarden
09-18-2006, 02:00 AM
Originally posted by skarden:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
Really? Hmm, that's really disappointing to me.

I took the total amount of stars and divided that by 1 million.

It seems there's a bit less sand than I previously thought. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/sadeyes.gif

Fritz

Um total stars in our galaxy? or the universe?
there's actually a very big difference. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

skarden
09-18-2006, 02:02 AM
opps double post http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif
is anyone else havin trouble with editing post's or is it my crappy computer? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/compsmash.gif

SeaFireLIV
09-18-2006, 04:46 AM
Sometimes I wonder how can we know so much about something we can barely experience? But then again I am impressed by what we do manage. I mean, being able to sling-shot probes around planets and using the gravity pull to get to places like Titan is quite a feat.

Yes, we may not know much and God probably laughs at us, but I still think what we do know is quite impressive.

Bo_Nidle
09-18-2006, 04:32 PM
Major "Moon Unit" here!!

One of lifes highpoints for me was meeting Apollo 15 Command Module pilot Al Worden at the Kennedy Space Centre in 2005.

It was the "Meet an Astronaut" encounter that they have. I was expecting some 25 year old trainee. I was amazed when it was an actual Apollo veteran!!!

I hijacked the Q&A session for about ten minutes!

The Nidles with Al Worden (By the way, it was bloody hot, and being British we're not used to heat, hence our wilting appearance)

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b194/BoNidle/NidlesandWorden.jpg

If you are going to Florida on your Hols then go to the KSC, you will not be disappointed!!!