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Ba5tard5word
06-15-2008, 12:10 AM
I've been playing with it off and recently started trying some of the harder difficulty settings.

I don't quite get this one. It's kinda cool that it makes the plane shake more in turns or when firing.

But what's with the way it makes the gunsights float around? Is that how gunsights in WW2 really worked? It's almost like a modern HUD. Is this how a WW2 gunsight would appear to the pilot (floating all around) or is this supposed to be a visual effect?

TinyTim
06-15-2008, 12:27 AM
That's how it's supposed to be - it worked like that IRL as well. In other words, if you shifted your head to the side too much, you don't see anything in the reflector glass anymore. See this thread (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/23110283/m/2481093716/p/1) for more info, or this video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SU58k2Tazoo) to see how it would appear IRL.

Ba5tard5word
06-15-2008, 02:36 AM
hmm that's interesting, I didn't realize it was an image reflected upwards.

I guess it's so that the pilot has a sense of where his bullets will go due to the plane's movement? Though it seems like you could get used to having a fixed sight that doesn't wobble around a bunch, once you get used to making deflection shots.

BWaltteri
06-15-2008, 02:41 AM
It is an exiting feature but I don't use it. My office interface is already challenging.

DKoor
06-15-2008, 04:45 AM
It's a matter of habit.
Once you get used to it, you wont even know it's there.
It will feel natural and also in a way it assists your gunnery.
Especially true during hard turns where player gets a feeling that he simply can not pull effective shot vs E/A due to combination of high speed/hard deflection, crosshair will in such cases almost disappear from reticle.

SeaFireLIV
06-15-2008, 06:08 AM
Originally posted by Ba5tard5word:
hmm that's interesting, I didn't realize it was an image reflected upwards.

I guess it's so that the pilot has a sense of where his bullets will go due to the plane's movement? Though it seems like you could get used to having a fixed sight that doesn't wobble around a bunch, once you get used to making deflection shots.

I don`t notice the headshake at all. Not a bit.

When I first saw this floating target-sight, I was also quite surprised, since it seemed quite advanced for WW2 aircraft.

Some aircraft in IL2 do have an iron sight. I was flying a Japanese plane when I accidentally hit a button and a metal sight rotated in place of the floating sight. Very nice.

Choctaw111
06-15-2008, 06:24 AM
I wouldn't like the feeling of being cemented in my seat. Playing with headshake on feels much more natural to me and makes it feel as though I am in a moving aircraft.

Tempelhof
06-15-2008, 09:10 AM
Some aircraft in IL2 do have an iron sight. I was flying a Japanese plane when I accidentally hit a button and a metal sight rotated in place of the floating sight. Very nice.


I'm a fan of iron gunsight http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
The Japs pilot can use the ironsight when the Revi was damaged. I've never known that, there is a button to change between Revi and iron sight. If you find it down by change, please tell me. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif
Btw, I don't really believe that, the sights of flexible MG on Russian bomber are reflector as simulated in the game. Iron sight may be better.

joeap
06-15-2008, 12:51 PM
Originally posted by Tempelhof:

I'm a fan of iron gunsight http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
The Japs pilot can use the ironsight when the Revi was damaged. I've never known that, there is a button to change between Revi and iron sight. If you find it down by change, please tell me. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif
Btw, I don't really believe that, the sights of flexible MG on Russian bomber are reflector as simulated in the game. Iron sight may be better.

There isn't, where did you read that?

Why do you think iron sight is more accurate for bomber MG btw? Where did you read that?

Tempelhof
06-15-2008, 08:44 PM
Well, in game, all of MG on German, Japanese and many US bomber have iron sight. USA did use Revi for some of their bomber, but even in the luxurious B-25, the nose and waist gunner used the iron sight, too.

And consider the IL-2. If you have an aircraft that was produced more than anything, an aircraft that was used on the worse condition of the battlefield, an aircraft whose crew are expected to die after 10 missions, so is it worth to install such a complicated device on it?

Tully__
06-16-2008, 03:43 AM
Originally posted by Ba5tard5word:
...I guess it's so that the pilot has a sense of where his bullets will go due to the plane's movement?...
The idea of the reflector sight is to put the aiming reticle at the same focus distance as the target so that both the aiming reticle and target are in focus at the same time. This is distinctly unlike iron sights where either the sight is in focus or the target, but not both at the same time.

The other advantage of putting the aiming reticle optically in the same place as the target is you don't have to line up two aiming points. Put the reticle on the target (or if the target is moving across your field of view, a little in front of the target) and pull the trigger. It can be very difficult maintaining alignment of two sighting elements such as found on a rifle when trying to sit up against several g of acceleration. Having to only keep one sighting element lined up is another big advantage.

Lurch1962
06-16-2008, 05:44 PM
Exactly right, Tully! To add to that...

The advantage of a collimated sight is that it *allows* some degree of head movement while maintaining the sight picture. In other words, the effect of parallax is negated. With aircraft iron sights, your sight line must be maintained to within, say, 1/4 to at most 1/2 inch (about 1 cm). An optical sight allows a deviation from axial position up to the semi-diameter of the collimating lens. In most gun sights the collimator is about 3 inches (7-8cm) in diameter, thus allowing the eye to wander off axis by up to 1.5 inches before the center of the reticle pattern is no longer seen. That's a relaxation on axial positioning by a factor about 8!

The effect is well illustrated in IL-2 when head shake is enabled. As the pilot's noggin wobbles due to plane buffeting, G-load and other accelerations, the gun sight's reticle is at least partly visible most of the time, allowing one to still aim and shoot. Try to keep a good aim using the iron sights under those same conditions!

For a typical example of head shake in a high performance plane...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wUwcj8glVRc&NR=1

...Ignore the deliberate tilting as the pilot cranes his head to look in various directions, or orienting the horizon line with his field of vision. Nonetheless, imagine trying to keep one eye positioned to within better than 1/2 inch!