PDA

View Full Version : Ezio is not that old!



Conniving_Eagle
06-08-2011, 08:21 PM
I see alot of people making fun of Ezio for his age in the game. Saying things like, "Grandpa Ezio" and "Only a matter of time before Arthritis kicks in," etc. I'm going to defend one of my favorite video-game character's by proving how old people can still be in shape.

First of all, Ezio may not have the stamina and endurance that he used to, but it's not like we're going to see him stumbling off rooftops gasping for breath in the middle of trying to assassinate someone. There's a couple reasons why old people are out of shape and have things like Osteoporosis, Arthritis, etc.

Old people have back problems because they don't excercise their backs enough when they are young. You're back is more prone to developing problems like unalined vertabrae, etc, if it is weak. Or, if you sit on your *** playing video-games all day. Sitting is not good for your back, and it is most like to get messed up when you're young. Even walking 30 minutes a day is good for your back, for those of you who are out of shape.

As for old people being fat, that's because of eating poorly. As you gain age, you're metabolism will eventually slow down. You can't be eating the same amounts and the same crap you were eating when you were 16. Most of the problems old people get are from the food they eat. Humans aren't meant to die from diseases, they are meant to die naturally. Your death should be you falling asleep in you're house, not during a surgery in a hospital. Back then, the quality of food that they had was much better and healthier, they didn't have McDonalds or Coca-Cola. Also, since it was before the industrial revolution, there was very little pollution. However, the reason why the average age was lower back than is because of lack and medical damage. Medical technology wasn't as sophisticated. And remember, they didn't have heating either. Alot of people died in the winter.

As for Arthritis, you don't get Arthritis from cracking your knuckles. You get Arthritis from eating the wrong food and using your hands too much. My friend got Arthritis when he was 24, because he was a workaholic, and his jobs involved alot of handwork. Playing video-games 12 hours a day every day until you're 30 will also cause you to get Arthritis. I have no doubt Ezio will get Arthritis when he is a little older. I mean those Assassin's must have some strong fingers to be able to be holding onto and climbing all those ledges.

Old people can still be in shape. My friend's great uncle is 62. He is an ex-navy SEAL. He's a teacher, and for his summer job he is a life gaurd. At his job, Life gaurds are allowed to work out on their break. He goes straps a cinder block to his back and goes for a 5 mile run in almost knee-deep water.

Mic_92
06-08-2011, 08:27 PM
Thanks for writing that I enjoyed reading it.

Another reason is that Ezio has blood from those who came before, which makes him stronger, faster and able to do all of those things others can barely do.

And yeah, if you keep exercising, you will still be in shape even when you're old.
I once heard about a 92 year old woman who participated in the Ironman Triathlon.

kriegerdesgottes
06-08-2011, 09:04 PM
Seriously he's only 52. How old is Jackie Chan right now? He's not quite old rickety man old yet. He's still got some years to be realistically awesome.

O6EvolutionIXMR
06-08-2011, 09:55 PM
Ignore them. Those who are so concerned about him being "too old" just have some growing up to do.
Jean Claude Van Damme is 50. I'd like some of the "complainers" on here compare their arms with his...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...s2UE&feature=related (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ohWnIus2UE&feature=related)

Sylvester Stallone at 62...
http://www.staralicious.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/sylvester-stallone-ripped.jpg

Training:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pl3BekaKNCY

Jason Statham. 43. Not far from 50...
http://www.betagirlblog.com/images/jason-statham-death-race-shirtless1.jpg

Jackie Chan. 57 and can still blow our minds with his stunts.
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Pb1FidDWkLI/Ta45fe8XmgI/AAAAAAAAfAQ/MAenTJM0C64/s1600/Jackie%252520Chan%252520%25285%2529.jpg

Jet Li. 48. Not far from Ezio's age in AC:R

http://homepage.mac.com/merussell/iblog/B835531044/C1592678312/E20060923202337/Media/JetLiBeckons.jpg

This Japanese guy is a bodybuilder. At 74...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...4C20E7F2946C&index=1 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-5om6gbDwA8&feature=BFp&list=WLEAF24C20E7F2946C&index=1)

CRUDFACE
06-08-2011, 11:19 PM
Originally posted by Mic_92:
Thanks for writing that I enjoyed reading it.

Another reason is that Ezio has blood from those who came before, which makes him stronger, faster and able to do all of those things others can barely do.

And yeah, if you keep exercising, you will still be in shape even when you're old.
I once heard about a 92 year old woman who participated in the Ironman Triathlon.

I think the enhancements are more neaural than anything. Like Eagle vision turned Eagle Sense. If their was anything physical because of the cross breeding, it's probably died down by now with them mating with only humans. OMG, have you heard about the guy that used to do stuff like that wwith his disabled son strapped to his back?

But yeah, Ezio has been working out for like decades now, and he's in great shape because of it. And those pictures above my post show that you can be older and kick some serious @ss.

Turkiye96
06-09-2011, 07:33 AM
Ur right, Altair lived up to 90 or something... and Ezio has a lot of assassin experience so he will be even better than before

SixKeys
06-09-2011, 08:04 AM
I like how everyone is pointing to movie actors as proof that people can still be badass at an older age. They're actors. It's their job to make you believe things that aren't true. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif You can have lots of muscle and not much physical strength. The two don't always go hand in hand. Ever heard of steroids? Even if you're strong enough to do weightlifting doesn't mean you have the stamina for freerunning.

The only one of those named above that I think is a good example is Jackie Chan who has always performed all his own stunts.

With that said, I think 52 is pushing it in terms of believability considering all the stuff Ezio does without even running out of breath, but it's still acceptable. Past 60 I would say probably not.

albertwesker22
06-09-2011, 08:57 AM
Originally posted by SixKeys:
I like how everyone is pointing to movie actors as proof that people can still be badass at an older age. They're actors. It's their job to make you believe things that aren't true. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif You can have lots of muscle and not much physical strength. The two don't always go hand in hand. Ever heard of steroids? Even if you're strong enough to do weightlifting doesn't mean you have the stamina for freerunning.

The only one of those named above that I think is a good example is Jackie Chan who has always performed all his own stunts.

With that said, I think 52 is pushing it in terms of believability considering all the stuff Ezio does without even running out of breath, but it's still acceptable. Past 60 I would say probably not.

Most old people are out of shape because they are slobs. 52 is still youngish, and if he's in shape there isn't much of a problem. There are plenty of endurance runners over 50. Like what was said before, people don't just magically lose their ability through age(again he's not 70!) It all depends on how you take care of yourself (Or do you believe Jackie Chan is superhuman?)

Besides, nobody loses their breath in Assassins Creed, how do you suppose Rodrigo Borgia(Fat as hell and pushing 70) had a drawn out fight with Ezio.

Moultonborough
06-09-2011, 09:11 AM
Well, I just looked all over the internet and could not find anything on average age of death for that time period. But, really the reason Ezio can move like he's still young is because it is a video game.

Inorganic9_2
06-09-2011, 09:46 AM
I wish peole would stop saying "it's a video game" to address these types of concerns. Yes, it's a game, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't be able to immerse yourself in it like it was history. That's the enjoyment I find; the historical parts being believable (I only make the distinction between the full game and the historical parts because obviously Animus tehcnology, TWCB etc.)

Moultonborough
06-09-2011, 10:47 AM
I love the historical parts of it. But physical abilities and history are two different things. No company is going to make their main character feel and limit what they can do by their age. The only exception to the rule is Snake in MGS4 but they did it well. It makes you feel like your there it's why I play games but there is the separation between physical abilities. I'm not saying 52 year old can't do things like triathlons but they can't do free running on buildings. No matter how real games get there is always the small line between real and game.

AdmiralPerry
06-09-2011, 11:02 AM
While I agree that some people making cracks about Ezio's age probably need to grow up, I can also find the humor in some of them. Anyway, I see the whole "Ezio's age" thing as the joke he will never live down--kind of like the way Altair has yet to live down the fact that he can't swim in the first game. People are STILL cracking jokes about that, and will always crack jokes about it, even when evidence states it was a bug in the Animus.

Will_Lucky
06-09-2011, 12:00 PM
What you state may very well be true for an individual in the 21st century, after all we have decent healthcare, decent diets ect.

However this is the 1500's, on average most people were dead before they hit 50, if they were alive they were expected to be retired. Ezio of course though has the genetics of those who came before and is very active alongside it.

iMBUE_
06-09-2011, 12:19 PM
Also, take into consideration that Ezio had the apple for a while. Who knows what he learned from it.

obliviondoll
06-09-2011, 12:30 PM
Also, this. (http://www.americanparkour.com/inspire/64-parkour/4477-angelicas-50th-birthday-parkour-video)

NORTHBOERN1
06-09-2011, 12:37 PM
After 28 it's all downhill...http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif.

SleezeRocker
06-09-2011, 01:25 PM
I call him Stairway to Heaven Ezio.
Idk why...but Ezio with the longer beard and the new Assassin robes make me think of the Hermit from the Stairay to Heaven posters from Led Zeppelin http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

ps- I like Ezio, but doesn't mean I can't throw in some self-satisfying humor http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

albertwesker22
06-09-2011, 01:36 PM
Originally posted by Will_Lucky:
What you state may very well be true for an individual in the 21st century, after all we have decent healthcare, decent diets ect.

However this is the 1500's, on average most people were dead before they hit 50, if they were alive they were expected to be retired. Ezio of course though has the genetics of those who came before and is very active alongside it.

Decent diets? Say that to the thousands of people in America, Australia, Samoa ect...that die of heart attacks each year as a direct results of their Western diets.

In the West we are far from Healthy as a whole. As for Ezio, he has a lot of money, I doubt he's dining on rotten fish.

There were fresh foods back then you know, Royals lived for a decent amount of years based on their diets(Not counting Henry VIII) And Ezio is no peasant, and the Assassins would have good diets (Chicken, Fresh Fish, fruit) Expensive to the average citizen but not a dent to Ezio's 1 000 000+ florin back account http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif


Originally posted by wraith_05:
Also, take into consideration that Ezio had the apple for a while. Who knows what he learned from it.

Like lay off the pork?

O6EvolutionIXMR
06-09-2011, 06:58 PM
Hopefully this can put an end to threads about Ezio's age once and for all...


What is age? As a wise man once said, a year is merely a man-made device for measuring how the Earth travels once around the sun. Aging does have mental and physical effects on all athletes. Everyone gets older. Most get wiser as well. Do we also get more fearful? Are we less reckless than before? If so, is this due to more responsibility in our daily lives as we grow older? Perhaps a fear of waning muscle strength? Or could it be a lack of confidence in our physical capabilities? We all know that our mind is the most powerful tool we have. We must use it as a tool for motivation, and not let it rule us by fear.

As we age our inner voice that tells us "I cannot do that" seems to get louder when presented with new challenges. Parkour, more than many other activities, constantly presents fresh situations where we must analyze and judge new challenges every time we go out. When we are running on a track, we don't have many new choices to make. That is, we aren't often confronted with a new obstacle or barrier that forces us to judge it (such as a foreign object) as well as how we choose to navigate it; assessing our own potential.

In parkour, however, we must make quick assessments and decisions. If something is high, we can do a number of things, and if it is wide or deep, then we have a totally different set of choices facing us. Training for swimming is similar to track, in that there aren't new obstacles in the water. Ball sports or martial arts present new things – nothing ever happens in the same exact manner twice. That being granted, very infrequently do we have to assess our own capabilities when performing these activities. More often we simply make a choice based on what the opponent does. We look at the offense and the defense, and make choices according to what things we see. Many of these actions are actually reactions based on previous experience. We practice things over and over until they are done by rote. Parkour is similar in that it is reaction-based, but often the situations are singular enough that memories are not involved. Usually we base our decisions on things we have practiced before, but it is not uncommon to do something entirely new during a parkour session.

If we see a wall that we have climbed before, then we know that we can climb it again. If we see a gap that we have precisioned before, then we feel confident about doing it again. It is when we are faced with new obstacles that we are wont to hesitate. Dostoyevsky said that “Taking a new step is what people fear most.” When we are young, we are fearless. As we grow older, we tend to lose some of that. We are slow to take that new step, wondering if we are still physically capable. Is all of this worry founded in truth?

The recent buzzword for age-related loss of muscle mass is ‘sarcopenia.’ Most doctors today agree that lack of use, more than age, is the main factor. The deterioration can start at age 25, and between the ages of 25 and 50 up to 10 percent of muscle mass can be lost, mainly by disuse. Between the ages of 50 and 80, an additional 40 percent can be lost. Scientists have found that sarcopenia can occur with highly active people as well, mainly with runners, people doing aerobics and people using a ‘Stairmaster’ machine. While the aerobic effect is good, it does little to maintain or improve muscle mass. Therefore, a combination of aerobic and strength or resistance training is necessary. Many people will use weights for the strength training aspect, but parkour seems ideally suited for this. Using the body’s weight as a tool for resistance training is a perfect way to counteract sarcopenia.

It is also never too late to start. Scientists have discovered that lean muscle mass can increase at any age if a strength-training program is started and maintained. Scientists point to a routine weight-training regimen to counteract sarcopenia, including squats, dumbbell rowing, lunges and pushups. All of these exercises have suitable counterparts in Parkour. The only dangers are in laziness, in trying to do too much too soon, or perhaps not frequently enough. As people age they tend to exercise less and injuries can occur more frequently. Therefore, good warm-ups, stretching, and dedication (at least three times a week) can help combat this. The problem with fear of loss of physical ability appears not to have any foundation: Rather, the fear is all in our minds. As that perennial wisdom states, the only real thing we have to fear… is fear itself.

When faced with a new obstacle on a training run, do we fear it to be impossible? It is possible that we haven’t maintained our physical abilities, but we probably hesitate due to the fear that our remaining capabilities are insufficient. Certainly fear and insecurity can play a part in on-the-spot evaluations. As we age, we cannot run as fast as we used to, nor jump as high or far. However, we do seem to be able to run as far: we can maintain stamina. It takes longer, but young and old alike compete in marathons and triathlons. If the mind can will it, the body can usually do it. It is a choice. "Do or do not; there is no ‘try’," as the short green one said.

One of the most important things for aging athletes is discipline: will power; that ‘never give up’ attitude; inner strength. Call it what you will, but that it is necessary is clearly manifest. We all want to think that we have no limits. This is worthy in principle, but in reality awkward. For example, we today cannot run 1500m in three minutes. Impossible. Therefore, knowing our limits can assist us in our training.

More pointedly, a knowledge of our limits and continually (albeit safely) trying to test and extend these limits is what drives many of us. We want to improve, to do more than before, and to do better than the most recent time. This is where the inner strength, the will power, comes into importance: in our daily training. If last week I did 10 sets of 20 chin ups, then this week I want to do 11 sets. Or 10 sets of 21. It is precisely here, at the edge of our limits, that our mind is telling us, pleading with us, to quit. It is saying that your body is hurting, that this is doing more harm than good, that it cannot go on.

Other times this inner voice could be sweet, but nonetheless, urging you to quit now. Perhaps it is congratulating you on all you have accomplished; well done, stop now and try to do the same again next time. It happens to all athletes, we all recognize this. It is at these times that our willpower must surface. We have to search for the tiny defiant voice ordering us to go on.

Often times this tiny defiant voice is entwined with anger. Anger, hate, rage... all these testosterone-filled emotions are powerful allies when testing our physical limits. It is also no secret that our teens and twenties are the years when our lives are most affected by testosterone. Age mellows us in this sense, and therefore transitively can serve to dim the tiny defiant voice that in the past urged us on through pain. Elite athletes find some way to rekindle these emotions, or to channel others as surrogates. It is the challenge of all athletes to find another way to tap into this resource.

Obviously long-time athletes can recognize this need for will power. Years of performing any activity requires a large degree of patience and discipline. For someone attempting to do a prolonged activity, years of practice at tapping into such emotions to prolong a workout is preferred to inexperience. However, it is not a prerequisite – merely being aware, having the knowledge (that you may need to tap into stereotypically testosterone-laden emotions) can be of use. Not all freerunners were athletes in a former life. Some played the piano. Others may have done nothing at all, but are seeking to improve themselves, to try something different and new.

Attempting to improve ourselves is an attitude worthy of respect by all. At a young age it is easy to laugh when seeing older people walking around a track. When we are young we can run so fast, and think it silly, or a waste of time, to go around slowly. It is much harder to realize that these older people are far better off than their friends that are sitting on the couch watching television. This different way of looking at things is central to parkour. We as a group seem very supportive, and applaud not only the results of others, but also the efforts. It is precisely these efforts that we need to embrace as aging individuals. We must remind ourselves that effort is the basis of rewards. We cannot shy away from trying a manoeuvre merely because a voice in our heads fears that we are no longer capable of such a feat.

To the victor go the spoils... but there are no real spoils in parkour. With great risk comes great reward... and therefore with risk comes reward. We must not let fear overcome us. We must find confidence, and act upon it. We must take the risk, and get our own reward, our own satisfaction. We must use our minds, our most powerful ally, in our battle against fear and age.



Original Article Link: Fear of aging (parkourgenerations.com ) (http://www.parkourgenerations.com/article/parkour-and-fear-aging)

halihayweed
06-14-2011, 04:46 PM
I believe they are just joking around when they say things like that. idk. i feel kind of creepy being attracted to a 52 year old lol