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funkster319
08-26-2008, 02:00 PM
Ok might be a stupid question but I am attempting to fly without any HUD msg's ie. Power 90% etc etc However

This also means I will miss out on engine overheat warning! Can anyone sumarise what I need to look out for to identify engine overheat ...would it be Oil temp, Rad temp? or something else???

I mainly fly Spits, hurricans, BF109, FW190 but dont want anything specific just general guidelines.

DrHerb
08-26-2008, 02:34 PM
My guess would be, on liquid cooled engines, you would look at coolant temps, whereas air cooled engines, id bet on oil temp.

Bearcat99
08-26-2008, 03:58 PM
On some planes... there is an over heat light.

DKoor
08-26-2008, 03:59 PM
I'm not sure, but I'm quite positive that on some planes you wont be able to tell in which position your radiator is, too.

M_Gunz
08-26-2008, 04:00 PM
Why bother putting in engine instruments if they weren't supposed to be checked now and then?
Use them both. I've seen oil temperature and pressure rise together at a time when there was
no easy place to land below (over the mountains, even the roads below were all twisty), they
only indicate other problems that may or may not get worse.

stalkervision
08-26-2008, 04:04 PM
just watch for the smoke.. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

WTE_Galway
08-26-2008, 04:45 PM
Originally posted by funkster319:
Ok might be a stupid question but I am attempting to fly without any HUD msg's ie. Power 90% etc etc However

This also means I will miss out on engine overheat warning! Can anyone sumarise what I need to look out for to identify engine overheat ...would it be Oil temp, Rad temp? or something else???

I mainly fly Spits, hurricans, BF109, FW190 but dont want anything specific just general guidelines.

Some planes suit flying no HUD better than others. The fw190 cockpit is one of the most suitable.

The overheat issue is tricky. Planes like the Lagg do have a temp light (which also comes on if the engine is too cold for safe operation as well). If there is no light, all you can do is fly the plane first with hud turned on and note the sort of gauge position that bring up the overheat message and also note how soon in combat its likely to occur.

Generally you find you tend to fly more conservatively without the HUD "cheats" enabled and learn to get results without "everything maxed" http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Eventually this will make you a better pilot.

On the plus side, you only need to cool the engine for a fraction of a second to be safe from damage for quite a while.

funkster319
08-27-2008, 04:14 PM
Thxs guys

I'm hoping this does force me to be more aware of the cockpit instrument and fingers crossed make me a better pilot http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

PS If you want me on Warclouds! - I'll be the one with the black trial of smoke http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

julian265
08-28-2008, 01:47 AM
You won't always be able to detect the overheating of liquid cooled engines from the coolant temp gauge - in a P51 for example, the coolant temp gauge stays quite low when at high altitudes, though oil temp can be high, and overheats still occur.

I haven't noticed the same behaviour in 109's or 190's... but I haven't looked out for it either.

PanzerAce
08-28-2008, 03:04 AM
Originally posted by julian265:
You won't always be able to detect the overheating of liquid cooled engines from the coolant temp gauge - in a P51 for example, the coolant temp gauge stays quite low when at high altitudes, though oil temp can be high, and overheats still occur.

I haven't noticed the same behaviour in 109's or 190's... but I haven't looked out for it either.

That's probably more an issue with the game engine than anything else, as in RL, you basically CAN'T get oil temps to climb w/out coolant temps also rising.

PanzerAce
08-28-2008, 03:10 AM
That actually kind of ties into a pet peeve I have in game. The game seems to me to over emphasize the importance of engine temp, and to UNDER emphasize oil temp/pressure. Engines tend to have a huge leeway with operating temps, but the oil temp and pressure is what will make or break an engine, especially heavy load stuff like planes. Even in cars, oil conditions are more important than coolant temps for the most part.

WTE_Ibis
08-28-2008, 03:39 AM
Mmmm, dunno, you don't get far with a boiling radiator but you can go for hours wth high oil temps.
Just my obs with cars.
cheers,
Ibis.

bolox00
08-28-2008, 04:35 AM
from my work with devicelink pits
http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/49310655/m/7201027043/p/15

overheat is governed by oil temp for liquid cooled engines and cht (which is identical to coolant temp ingame http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_redface.gif ). the accuracy of the ingame gauges is not perfect in some aircraft (p47 is worst offender) so you cannot always rely on ingame gauges.
overheat also appears to be a simple 'switch' that sets the engine damage timer running when above temp and resets it when drops below

from memory overheat temps are 125 for spits,109's etc, 128 for 190's(oil temp) and 215 for pw engined planes(cht)- these figures read from devicelink

you could always fly by the settings given in pilot's notes for your plane for boost/revs-works until you've a string of bandits on your six.

all the above relates purely to ingame and is my understanding of the engine modelling as we have it http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

PanzerAce
08-28-2008, 12:02 PM
Originally posted by WTE_Ibis:
Mmmm, dunno, you don't get far with a boiling radiator but you can go for hours wth high oil temps.
Just my obs with cars.
cheers,
Ibis.

What kind of car do you drive, and what do you consider to be 'high' oil temps? As an example, in my Rebello built engine, I'm running heavy oil, especially compared to most econo cars. They might run 0w-15, I'm running 10 or 15w-50. The reason? My engine is going to be putting alot more load on the bearings than an econo car.

Or look at it this way: Untill your oil is sufficiently warm, flooring the accelerator in a car WILL damage it more than if you had waited for a bit. The simple fact is that unless oil temp and pressure are in the green regions (and unlike coolant, with oil the green region has a lower limit as well), then you are going to be causing unneeded damage to your engine.

funkster319
08-29-2008, 02:58 PM
Thxs bolox00

Great stuff http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif