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View Full Version : Self-Expression And Bringing Truth Into Video Games



FutureVenturer
02-29-2008, 06:35 PM
What's your take on the importance of making video games as a part of everyone's lives? Would you rather continue to see only children playing video games, or would it be better to also have it expand to that of adults & seniors? This is where I've been trying to go with the idea of self-expression & culture. Moreover, self-expression is very important since it can help us realize more of the truth about different things in reality, while having it appear in video games. Don't you think that many games, particularly FPS games, still feel disconnected from the world of reality, when it comes to really doing those actions, particularly using weapons? I see a greater importance through self-expression delivering moods, which will help us do more than just laugh and remain happy about a game we own right now or are renting at this point. How can we make it so that many gamers will see a better influence in life? How can games focused on war be finally created in such ways that will present a lot of sadness and disturbance, as being a part of the true meaning of war? After all, war is hell, and many people must get this through their heads. How can we teach that street racing can be a very dangerous situation for anyone, while making it still feel fun and great in video games? How can we help influence each other in ways that we'll grow more understanding of the world and of each other's own experiences? This is where I've meant to dig into, when looking at self-expression.

InsaneDriver06
03-01-2008, 09:51 AM
Truth according to who? This is getting a bit philosophical for a game forum.

I see your point about street racing being dangerous. But it's entertainment, not reality. That's why it's in the game world. Does GTA teach people to kill? Only stupid people who've lost it.

Violence in video games should have a story behind it, a reason for the violence. So Pac Man should eat the ghosts cause he wants to survive, not because he just wants to end their existence and keep all the pellets for himself.

I think games can be entertainment, while telling a great story, and the story is what delivers the message, if that's the goal of the story.

FutureVenturer
03-01-2008, 10:06 AM
I didn't mean to say that street racing games should be completely based around that idea of it being a dangerous thing in real life. I just said that they could have a more different tone and mood to help it feel intense. When I'm talking about adding truth (or philosophy, as you'd call it) into video games, I mean that games, particularly ones with war and any others, which are not based on humor, can try to give players a lesson in life. The GTA games would not be the best examples because they're trying to be funny, but can they go further in how funny they are, sure, why not? A story is not enough to cram everything into video games. Many times, its just to get the player from start to finish, nothing more. Plus, stories, as I've mentioned before, have been too similar for many cases. For example, Nazis and aliens have been used so many times in FPS games. And how many times have we see elves, dwarves, and all those other fantasy things in a fantasy game? Why couldn't developers take more time to think it through better? I would really want to go for an almost real feeling of war. Anyways, as we grow closer to virtual reality, why can't developers and anyone else find the importance in showing things at a more realistic scope. Graphics are where we've wanted more realism and in gameplay, but many times it doesn't innovate highly enough, such that giving the game a bit of mood, if not a lot, and self-expression, could really help drive a game's story forward as well as the rest of the experience that is done behind it.

When developers do add mood to games (besides just acting like *** on Xbox Live and to feel happy about completing a game), it makes those games very special. The Metal Gear Solid games have been one of the fewest games ever to bring forth mood into a story, and that's very sad, knowing that many other developers out there can work on this too.

Mafia is a game that made gangster games go deeper because it gave a story that portrays the true nature of being a gangster. It helped make all of the reality come right into a game. I guess you can say that it allows for more than one type of mood within a game because of all the things it makes possible through the missions and cut scenes. You should really check out this game and see for yourself what it's capable of. While it's a linear game, it is very close to being as great as GTA III, and that says a lot. In terms of quality, it's above it, but in replay value, it may need to work harder at that to be better.

kalle90
03-01-2008, 11:03 AM
This is getting a bit philosophical for a game forum.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/agreepost.gif

I really don't know how deep or where we (I) should go in thinking. I'm really confused http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

Should everyone in Driver die in 1 or 2 shots and be broken down after death of someone?People who really think GTA is funny should get some help, sure there's funny way to tell it, but you never forget the base and find all sorts of hidden meanings.

Max Payne actually has "real" story with all emotions and thoughts flying all over the place. There were some really depressing and sad events. I actually liked wandering around Max's mind althought there was nothing to do besides watching. Proves the power of story again.

Using nazis or elves doesn't make game story bad, it just adds familiar layer. That in mind developers couldn't even use humans as we have thoughts of them. All games should feature never seen settings.



While it's a linear game, it is very close to being as great as GTA III, and that says a lot. In terms of quality, it's above it, but in replay value, it may need to work harder at that to be better

That's the thing. Terminator Dawn Of Fate is really crappy game, but the story and athmosphere rise it to bar with Brute Force, which is great action, but lacks all I need to releate to game. Bad game with story is surprisingly near the good game with no story.

InsaneDriver06
03-03-2008, 06:42 PM
Art. Mood. Deepness. I see the point of trying to have a game's story be a very meaningful experience/lesson, and there are plenty of games that inspire people in some way. But not all of them have to make the gamer "stand back and reflect on life". Fun for example is an alternate lesson, and THE major reason most gamers game.

FutureVenturer
03-18-2008, 10:13 AM
Game developers must, no matter what, follow the 4F's of GGD, which are not only fun, but also to consider feedback (giving a player rewards, punishing the player), fairness (is it easy, is it difficult?), and feasibility (sticking right to the main point of the game). As long as games are able to do this, everything will be fine. However, you can agree with me that war games should see moods that stretch further than a serious one right? And who here is pro-war? If not, then we can all agree that, on anti-war games, much like with anti-war films, sadness, destruction, and fear, as well as other factors need to be seen exactly as they are for someone who has gone to war. The things that other games can do is to provide some humor, some serious points, and some sadness, to say the least. If Hideo Kojima can do all of these factors for all the Metal Gear Solid games, then why can't anyone else do the same?

InsaneDriver06
03-30-2008, 05:03 PM
Originally posted by FutureVenturer:
Game developers must, no matter what, follow the 4F's of GGD, which are not only fun, but also to consider feedback (giving a player rewards, punishing the player), fairness (is it easy, is it difficult?), and feasibility (sticking right to the main point of the game). As long as games are able to do this, everything will be fine. However, you can agree with me that war games should see moods that stretch further than a serious one right? And who here is pro-war? If not, then we can all agree that, on anti-war games, much like with anti-war films, sadness, destruction, and fear, as well as other factors need to be seen exactly as they are for someone who has gone to war. The things that other games can do is to provide some humor, some serious points, and some sadness, to say the least. If Hideo Kojima can do all of these factors for all the Metal Gear Solid games, then why can't anyone else do the same?

I'm not sure a driving game needs "sadness" in order to be a well rounded, successful driving game. I understand it might help offer a dramatic storyline, but I'm not looking to be sad while playing Driver. Excitement, tension, thrill of the chase; those are more meaningful in a Driver game.

MGS is about Solid Snake, the character, Driver is about the vehicles first, or at least it should be.