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Stefan-R
07-06-2007, 08:13 AM
Following sentence i've read in Royal Air Force
fighter pilot instruction manual from 1940:


Attack forward of the Beam; it is the most effective, and you don't get hit often. Your breakaway must be a "HAM" manoeuvre downwards.


What is a "HAM" manoeuvre and what is the Beam?

Thanks for you help http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Stefan-R
07-06-2007, 08:13 AM
Following sentence i've read in Royal Air Force
fighter pilot instruction manual from 1940:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">
Attack forward of the Beam; it is the most effective, and you don't get hit often. Your breakaway must be a "HAM" manoeuvre downwards.
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

What is a "HAM" manoeuvre and what is the Beam?

Thanks for you help http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

stalkervision
07-06-2007, 09:22 AM
The "beam" is normally a reference to RADAR BEAMS&gt; not in Il-2 (reference Falcon 4.0 for info) but in this instance it makes no sense... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

sounds like a Nautical reference... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

berg417448
07-06-2007, 09:34 AM
Beam means the mid point of the aircraft or ship. So when they say forward of the beam they mean an attack from the forward quarter.

Stuntie
07-06-2007, 09:35 AM
Its nautical - abeam means right besides, so forwards of the beam or side would be the front quarter.

HAM, I'm not sure of.

Daiichidoku
07-06-2007, 09:56 AM
my guess;

height at mast


or for the kamekaze handbook, hit at mast http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif

OMK_Hand
07-06-2007, 12:55 PM
Hi Stefan-R

What is the manual called? What is the context (or subject) of the quote?

Waldo.Pepper
07-06-2007, 02:11 PM
HAM = hard over maneuver.

Origin is also nautical. In nautical terms it is a reference to the rudder. So for the airplane this would refer to the stick (and rudder to enhance) the escaping move. Wouldn't surprise me if the term was being quoted from a Fleet Air Arm publication/discussion.

SithSpeeder
07-06-2007, 06:51 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Waldo.Pepper:
HAM = hard over maneuver. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Last I checked, HAM &lt;&gt;(does not equal) Hard Over Maneuver...unless this is another "exception" to the English language http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif

* _54th_Speeder *

zardozid
07-06-2007, 07:16 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">quote:
Originally posted by Waldo.Pepper:
HAM = hard over maneuver.


Last I checked, HAM &lt;&gt;(does not equal) Hard Over Maneuver...unless this is another "exception" to the English language Googly

* _54th_Speeder * </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


"Hard About Maneuver" nautical= "bring her hard about..." (turn around hard/fast)

Waldo.Pepper
07-06-2007, 08:31 PM
HA rd over M aneuver.

Stefan-R
07-07-2007, 02:13 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by OMK_Hand:
Hi Stefan-R

What is the manual called? What is the context (or subject) of the quote? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It's called "Forget-Me-Nots for Fighters" from 1940 and created by No. 13 Group RAF. (so not from FAA)

But given the fact that the a/c is often called "the ship" in several publications, the "hard over manouvre" sounds feasible to me.

Is that solution just a guess or fact?

Hanglands
07-07-2007, 02:42 AM
Hi,

In maritime terminology, the beam of a ship means the breadth, or width of a ship.
Maybe when applied to aircraft it refers to the point of greatest breadth/width, ie the wings?
So 'forward of the beam' means forward of the wings - pretty much yhe front quarter as someone else has already said.

As for HAM.... what about High Angle Manoevre?

MrMojok
07-07-2007, 02:59 AM
yeah--- it sounds to me like it is saying 'attack forward of his 3-9 line' (3-9 on the CLOCK)

After the attack, it sounds like it is saying to split-S away, or something.

Sounds like what the Germans did against the heave bombers.

Stuntie
07-07-2007, 04:59 AM
HAM could be something High Aspect Manouver or High Angle Manouver etc.
Definately means a 'get the hell out of it' type action.

Stefan-R
07-11-2007, 01:22 AM
Any new ideas? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/touche.gif

danjama
07-11-2007, 01:51 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Stuntie:
Definately means a 'get the hell out of it' type action. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

NAFP_supah
07-11-2007, 03:03 AM
When ATC tells you to report abeam a certain point they want you to call them when you have that point on your wing. Perhaps they mean that http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

mrsiCkstar
07-11-2007, 03:06 AM
yep, beam is the 3-9 line...

if I'm beaming an incoming missile I'm keeping it on my wingtip... if I'm attacking from the targets beam then I'm attacking from his 3 or 9 o' clock.

OMK_Hand
07-11-2007, 10:26 AM
After the Battle of Britain No. 13 Group squadrons were assigned to assist RAF Coastal Command...

leitmotiv
07-11-2007, 02:18 PM
Since the RAF used nautical terminology for describing the aircraft: port (left), starboard (right), beam (side), midships (middle), aft (rear), etc. The HAM definition of both Waldo and zardozid looks perfect. I am embarrassed because I've been involved in nautical matters for 50 years and I've never heard of HAM. Ouch!

What that manual was describing, then, was the classic United States Navy, "high side attack"---hit the enemy with a high deflection closing attack from the side ahead of his beam, and break away with a hard pull aft as you dive away---again, offering a high deflection target.

The object was to make the aiming task for the other bombers' gunners well nigh impossible due to the high closing speed, and to hit from the broadside angle where German target bomber had no guns to bear.