PDA

View Full Version : WWII Facts #2: Merchant crew pay during wartime.



TASKFORCE1x1
10-19-2004, 04:13 PM
Captains would all rally in a room together and brief about the convoy mission prior to crossing the atlantic to goto England. They would explain convoy discipline before the mission. Everyone is to stick together. No one is to scatter. Maintain rank, distance and speed from eachother.

Already warships know what their rules are. SOme of which should never be broken. Some corvets at the time were breaking rules like going-it-alone after a sub. Determined captains end up making very dumb mistakes like this when its more important to have team work against the enemy than be an "easy target" for them.

When a ship gets hit by a torpedo and sinks soon after the crew, if lucky, is left either in a raft at sea, in a life jacket, or picked up by a passing merchant or escort. The moment their ship sinks all their pay stops. They only get paid up till the time their ship sinks. They dont loose the entire money they earned at sea from up until that time. Time spent in the water , aboard a lifeboat, or elsewhere other than their assigned duty station will be considered vacation time in a way.
Page 100. The Battle Of The Atlantic.

LOL hummm some vacation.

(well the book didnt actually say vacation but its more or less to the point of not getting paid at all.)

HeibgesU999
10-19-2004, 04:52 PM
It doesn't seem fair considering some POW's received years of backpay when they finally made it home.

hauitsme
10-19-2004, 06:14 PM
Who said WAR is 'fair'?

TASKFORCE1x1
10-19-2004, 07:55 PM
I'm all for that backpay. For a soldier who fights and represents their country its only respectful of a government to give rather than adbandon their comrads or citizens. Its the moral correct thing to do. Agreed.

hauitsme
10-19-2004, 08:47 PM
Who said WAR is 'moral'?

macker33
10-21-2004, 06:37 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by TASKFORCE1x1:
Some corvets at the time were breaking rules like going-it-alone after a sub. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Did corvettes make it across the atlantic?
I thought they were only useful for coastal and harbour defence and for sub hunting in bad weather.

SailorSteve
10-21-2004, 11:49 AM
http://uboat.net/allies/warships/class.html?ID=42

http://www.hazegray.org/navhist/canada/ww2/

The Flower class had a range of 3500nm at 12 knots, the later Castles could make more than 9000nm.

So they did indeed escort convoys all the way. I've also read that they would sometimes refuel and reload their depth charges from a special supply ship on the way.

bertgang
10-22-2004, 04:38 AM
As Sailor Steve said, refuel and reload at sea was often available for escorts; fleet tankers and similar ships were designed for this task.

Again on merchant crews pay, now.
Weren't merchant sailors civilians paid by the owner of the ship? If so, it's easy to understand why the boss refused the payment when not at work.

Kapitan_Nereus
10-22-2004, 04:54 AM
i can understand why the privatly owned ships crews wouldn't get paid because techniclly, they aren't working
its harsh but it is true
but talking it as holiday time is just cruel lol

TASKFORCE1x1
10-22-2004, 07:40 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by macker33:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by TASKFORCE1x1:
Some corvets at the time were breaking rules like going-it-alone after a sub. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Did corvettes make it across the atlantic?
I thought they were only useful for coastal and harbour defence and for sub hunting in bad weather. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Brittain used whatever they could get their hands on before the lend-lease act. Some escort vessels could go half way and trun back. Sometimes the dangerous practice of refueling at sea were performed.