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Lord-Rapter
07-04-2005, 04:04 PM
Now, I admit, I'm a Red Flyer.
So, I'm used to Turn and Burning and normally very good with it. But recently in the greater green server, a late war fight was going on, with Yak-3p and FW-A9, BF109-k4 and some more.

And no surprise nearly everyone was flying Yak-3, so i decided, to make the teams somewhat more equal. So i join blue and flew the FW-A9.

I'v flown the A9 a couple of times, but not often so I'v never really got any good at it, and also the Boom n Zoom qualitys of it, again in not a BnZer. So i was wondering if anyone could post some tips on BnZing and some tips flying the A9.

Thanks in Advance

Lord-Rapter

VW-IceFire
07-04-2005, 04:10 PM
Have a look here: http://www.airwarfare.com/tactics/tactics_fwtactics.htm

My own personal tips:
1) Be faster
2) Be higher
3) Don't turn, have a shot, regain your alt, flip over on your back, and have another pass at him

The power of the FW190 is that if you do it right, you as the attacker are never in a position where the defenders guns might be brought to bear. You will always have the opportunity to shoot and he will have few if any chances to shoot back.

Keep in mind that FW190s work better in pairs as you can keep up a continual attack with two FW190s using slash and climb techniques at varrying times to keep the enemy occupied with one while the other positions for attack. I've seen a pair of FW190s defeat superior numbers of Yaks (although the Yak-3 is a different story maybe) using this method.

mynameisroland
07-04-2005, 05:00 PM
Your advantages over the Yak3 are superior speed - by a large margin and superior firepower by an even bigger margin.

Abover 4000m you hold most of the cards stay there! cruise along at 80% power and when you see a Yak or a L7 for that matter dive down and shoot him. If you miss climb above him using your energy and then dive again. Rinse and repeat until he is dead or you have blown your advantage in which case fly away and come back once you hold the upper hand.

Patience and gunnery skills are whats needed and confidence to engage and disengage on your terms dont fight like your in a Zero. The Fw series have a high speed advantage over nearly all planes in game - Think of it this way

Most 44 planes can reach speeds of over 400mph in game but where as a Yak or a 109 or a Spitfire handle like a bus at speeds above 400 the Fw lightens up to such an extent that it outmanuvers these planes comprehensively. A Fw 190A9 will out turn a Yak 3 at all speeds over 500 km\h

Stackhouse25th
07-04-2005, 05:21 PM
join a squad, preferably ours, well teach you interception and BnZ.. well teach you how to counter BnZ and get the kill, and boom n zoom

NorrisMcWhirter
07-04-2005, 05:38 PM
As suggested, get alt and stay fast. Remember that a fast opponent isn't such a problem as you may still outmanuever it especially rolling.

Don't be afraid to disengage...er...extend following a failed boom attack (ignore the taunts of 'coward' from those less capable than yourself) to either drag an enemy to friendlies or to allow you to re-engage when you have your advantage back.

The A9, especially with 30mms in the loadout, makes short work even of VVS aircraft. Practice your deflection shooting offline as it can really be essential (and satisfying) part of your skills for the 190. A lot of experienced 190 pilots savour, above all else, the high deflection shot angle kill.

Ta,
Norris

Hristo_
07-04-2005, 11:19 PM
Rule number 1: lose the hotshot Maverick John Wayne mentality. It may be good for these forums, but will get you killed in Fw 190 online.

Instead...

Be careful, think and plan your actions.
Prepare for the fight before it actually happens.
Climb above expected enemy position and gain speed.
Try to use staircase climb - get to 400 kph then zoom to 300 kph. Repeat. This leaves you enough speed to maneuver if bounced and also allows forward visibility which is bad in classic climbout.
Never get slow, you never know who is stalking you.
Never get low, unless you are diving for home.
Always know where friendlies are.
Have an escape route ready.
Memorize landmarks and sun position, sometimes there won't be enough time to look at the compass.
Dive below the target and hide in its blind spot.
Just before firing, look around you and check six - is someone bouncing you ?
Fire at target, but do not turn with it.
If possible, choose a shot where he won't be able to fire at your back when you pass him.
After the pass, dive away.Do not get tempted to zoom and reverse with a loop. While most energy efficient, it will leave you slow and vulnerable to anyone who has just seen your tracers and is now diving at you.
Use long fast curves to turn.

VF-29_Sandman
07-05-2005, 05:28 AM
what hristo_ said requires disipline with a touch of stalking. those who excel in the 190 do the above. the p-38 requires just as much disipline as the 190; both are extremely vicious machines running in tandem, and like the 190, the p-38 is a 'thinking man's' aircraft. lack of forward view u wont have in a 38 like u will in a 190, but the 190's guns are just as devastating as a well placed burst from the lightning.

WOLFMondo
07-05-2005, 06:22 AM
Nice thing about learning the 190 is you can take most of the experiance gained and start learning the P47...exept the P47 has a mirror which makes a world of difference to the paranoid bnZ'er.

VF-29_Sandman
07-05-2005, 06:33 AM
but the mirror will also eat into ur fps. but compared to the rear view of a 190, the p-47/d-27 has a much better rear view. and 8x50 cals properly aimed and converged will put a bogey in a world of hurt.

F19_Ob
07-05-2005, 08:56 AM
Originally posted by Lord-Rapter:
.....recently in the greater green server, a late war fight was going on, with Yak-3p and FW-A9, BF109-k4 and some more.
And no surprise nearly everyone was flying Yak-3, so i decided, to make the teams somewhat more equal. So i join blue and flew the FW-A9.

......... So i was wondering if anyone could post some tips on BnZing and some tips flying the A9.



My take on it.

Yak-3p Is better than FW a9 and as fast low on the deck, if not faster.
The fw turns momentarily better at highest speed, so that may be used to evade.
U won't fool an expert in the yak twice though.
The roll is also better in fw190 and when going fast one can roll away from the bulletstream of a chasing yak3p.
If u are hit plan to bail before it's too late, too low.
The drag will increase and the yak will catch up quickly.

To battle any yak3 with a fw190 or bf109 alone Historically was close to suicide.

A good rule for survival (my opinion) in the A9 or any FW190 is;
Stay higher than 3000m. Below that U fight on the yak3's terms.
Only go for bounces or team attacks and If the yak3 spots U alone before your attack, abort and run for home. If lucky you'll run into friends on the way.
The thing that makes the yak3 so dangerous is the high speed combined with very flat trajectory on both cannon and mg's. That means U may be hit even at 500m distance when flying straight when U try to escape. If u roll and turn the yak only comes closer.
So, it's really hard for fw's when yaks and La7's are in the opposition.

In RL Fw190's sometimes even could be caught with earlier yaks and p39's aswell since the fw190 usually didn't reach the factory specs speed.
Golodnikov is one russian pilot who wasn't too impressed with the fw190's performance over russia.
Perhaps many planes were worn from the tough conditions?

Golodnikov interviews:
http://lend-lease.airforce.ru/english/articles/golodnikov/
-----------------------------------------------
Here is an example from the 4.th interview.

-"A.S. In spite of all this, Nikolay Gerasimovich, in your view why did the FW-190 not €œrule€ on the Eastern Front? By all accounts from Soviet pilots, it was a good fighter, but no more than that. On the Western Front, the Fokker caused an uproar.

-"N.G. You are correct. It was a powerful fighter, equal to any other. But in its combat qualities it was not unique in any way.
Overall I got the impression that the Germans expected a lot from this aircraft, but clearly overestimated its impact and exaggerated its capabilities.
For example, who ever gave them the notion that the Airacobra was inferior to the Fokker in speed? They believed it. At first the Germans were very confident in its superiority in speed, and it happened frequently that, after an attack, a Fokker would attempt to break away from us at full throttle. We caught up to him and €œpoured it to him€ from above. He €œhuffed€ and €œpuffed€ but could not break contact. We quickly broke the Germans of the habit of using full power. Later, it became a rule with Fokkers€"to break off from an attack or pull away from under fire only by a steep dive, and by no other method.
The Fokker also was not equal to the Airacobra in the vertical, although they initially attempted to fight with us in the vertical plane. We also quickly broke them of this habit. I still don€t understand why they decided that the Fokker could outperform the Airacobra in the vertical.
The acceleration dynamic of the Fokker was a weakness, perhaps its weakest characteristic. Later they attempted to maneuver the Fokker so that they would not lose speed. In a protracted maneuver battle of a Fokker against a Yak, Lavochkin, or Airacobra€"the Fokker lost from the start. He lost his speed and then it was over. Until he acquired new speed, we had more than one opportunity to shoot him down. Our aircraft were very dynamic.
The Fokker was powerful in head-on combat and the Germans often took advantage of this. They knew that their aircraft could withstand two or three hits but could shoot down the enemy with a single burst. This gave them great confidence in frontal attack. However, the Germans quickly began to regard frontal attacks on Airacobras with great caution. We had a 37mm cannon, a round from which no engine could withstand. One hit and it was over. Knowing this, it took nerves of steel to conduct a frontal attack. The engine could not save him. We had stronger nerves than the Germans.
I experienced this myself one time. We were engaged frontally by four Fokkers. Four against four. It turned out that during a turn my wingman got in front of me. I told him, €œGo ahead, you€re in front; I will cover you!€ He hit the lead Fokker in the nose with his cannon. He hit the German with one, perhaps even two cannon rounds. The Fokker disintegrated. The three that were left immediately dispersed and we lost sight of them. The whole engagement lasted several seconds."

Hristo_
07-05-2005, 09:15 AM
Those pompous Russians http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Which Fokker were they fighting ?

mynameisroland
07-05-2005, 10:24 AM
Originally posted by F19_Ob:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Lord-Rapter:
.....recently in the greater green server, a late war fight was going on, with Yak-3p and FW-A9, BF109-k4 and some more.
And no surprise nearly everyone was flying Yak-3, so i decided, to make the teams somewhat more equal. So i join blue and flew the FW-A9.

......... So i was wondering if anyone could post some tips on BnZing and some tips flying the A9.



My take on it.

Yak-3p Is better than FW a9 and as fast low on the deck, if not faster.
The fw turns momentarily better at highest speed, so that may be used to evade.
U won't fool an expert in the yak twice though.
The roll is also better in fw190 and when going fast one can roll away from the bulletstream of a chasing yak3p.
If u are hit plan to bail before it's too late, too low.
The drag will increase and the yak will catch up quickly.

To battle any yak3 with a fw190 or bf109 alone Historically was close to suicide.

A good rule for survival (my opinion) in the A9 or any FW190 is;
Stay higher than 3000m. Below that U fight on the yak3's terms.
Only go for bounces or team attacks and If the yak3 spots U alone before your attack, abort and run for home. If lucky you'll run into friends on the way.
The thing that makes the yak3 so dangerous is the high speed combined with very flat trajectory on both cannon and mg's. That means U may be hit even at 500m distance when flying straight when U try to escape. If u roll and turn the yak only comes closer.
So, it's really hard for fw's when yaks and La7's are in the opposition.

In RL Fw190's sometimes even could be caught with earlier yaks and p39's aswell since the fw190 usually didn't reach the factory specs speed.
Golodnikov is one russian pilot who wasn't too impressed with the fw190's performance over russia.
Perhaps many planes were worn from the tough conditions?

Golodnikov interviews:
http://lend-lease.airforce.ru/english/articles/golodnikov/
-----------------------------------------------
Here is an example from the 4.th interview.

-"A.S. In spite of all this, Nikolay Gerasimovich, in your view why did the FW-190 not €œrule€ on the Eastern Front? By all accounts from Soviet pilots, it was a good fighter, but no more than that. On the Western Front, the Fokker caused an uproar.

-"N.G. You are correct. It was a powerful fighter, equal to any other. But in its combat qualities it was not unique in any way.
Overall I got the impression that the Germans expected a lot from this aircraft, but clearly overestimated its impact and exaggerated its capabilities.
For example, who ever gave them the notion that the Airacobra was inferior to the Fokker in speed? They believed it. At first the Germans were very confident in its superiority in speed, and it happened frequently that, after an attack, a Fokker would attempt to break away from us at full throttle. We caught up to him and €œpoured it to him€ from above. He €œhuffed€ and €œpuffed€ but could not break contact. We quickly broke the Germans of the habit of using full power. Later, it became a rule with Fokkers€"to break off from an attack or pull away from under fire only by a steep dive, and by no other method.
The Fokker also was not equal to the Airacobra in the vertical, although they initially attempted to fight with us in the vertical plane. We also quickly broke them of this habit. I still don€t understand why they decided that the Fokker could outperform the Airacobra in the vertical.
The acceleration dynamic of the Fokker was a weakness, perhaps its weakest characteristic. Later they attempted to maneuver the Fokker so that they would not lose speed. In a protracted maneuver battle of a Fokker against a Yak, Lavochkin, or Airacobra€"the Fokker lost from the start. He lost his speed and then it was over. Until he acquired new speed, we had more than one opportunity to shoot him down. Our aircraft were very dynamic.
The Fokker was powerful in head-on combat and the Germans often took advantage of this. They knew that their aircraft could withstand two or three hits but could shoot down the enemy with a single burst. This gave them great confidence in frontal attack. However, the Germans quickly began to regard frontal attacks on Airacobras with great caution. We had a 37mm cannon, a round from which no engine could withstand. One hit and it was over. Knowing this, it took nerves of steel to conduct a frontal attack. The engine could not save him. We had stronger nerves than the Germans.
I experienced this myself one time. We were engaged frontally by four Fokkers. Four against four. It turned out that during a turn my wingman got in front of me. I told him, €œGo ahead, you€re in front; I will cover you!€ He hit the lead Fokker in the nose with his cannon. He hit the German with one, perhaps even two cannon rounds. The Fokker disintegrated. The three that were left immediately dispersed and we lost sight of them. The whole engagement lasted several seconds." </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It is well known that most Fw 190's used on the eastern front were Schlachtgeschwader AC or derated versions akin to what we have in game (for the A4 model derated from 1.42 boost) So perhaps the Fw's encountered and reported on and captured 'were not performing to factory spec' because they were not fighter versions maybe?

The RAF certainly did not encounter these derated versions or it would have been reflected in their battle reports.

I would also question the accuracy of a pilot who keeps reffering to the Focke Wulf as a Fokker.

Ps Yak 3's sea level speed is 567km/h
Fw A9's is 595km/h this is a big difference

3.JG51_BigBear
07-05-2005, 10:50 AM
Many of the Focke Wulfs on the eastern front were the fighter bomber versions like the A5-U5 and U8s. The Luftwaffe apparently felt that the "hotter" fighter versions were needed to counter the British and Americans while the fighter bomber versions would be adequate in the East and would allow units to be more flexible by giving them the ability to stage both fighter and bomber sorties.

F19_Olli72
07-05-2005, 10:52 AM
Originally posted by mynameisroland:
I would also question the accuracy of a pilot who keeps reffering to the Focke Wulf as a Fokker.



Why? Luftwaffe pilots referred to Polikarpov I-153's as "Curtiss" ... FockeWulf SchmockeWulf....who cares.

F19_Ob
07-05-2005, 11:53 AM
Originally posted by mynameisroland:

It is well known that most Fw 190's used on the eastern front were Schlachtgeschwader AC or derated versions akin to what we have in game (for the A4 model derated from 1.42 boost) So perhaps the Fw's encountered and reported on and captured 'were not performing to factory spec' because they were not fighter versions maybe?


I think all 4 articles are pretty interesting. well worth contemplating. Lots of text though.


He also met the bomber version of fw190.
---------------------------------------------
"While it was carrying external stores this aircraft, of course, was €œharmless€; but after it had dropped its ordnance it was a standard Fokker, no better and no worse."
----------------------------------------------

Sure there were derated and worn out planes on all sides. Rookie pilots aswell as experts.
Golodnikow explains why the planes didn't meet specs.
---------------------------------------------
"You can try, but it is a difficult and thankless task to compare the combat qualities of aircraft using reference book data. There are simply too many nuances to consider."
----------------------------------------------

Quote from 4:th article.
http://lend-lease.airforce.ru/english/articles/golodnikov/part4.htm

"A.S. Nikolay Gerasimovich, you have told us a great deal but nonetheless have not explained the principal reason why the Fokker did not become the €œbe all and end all€ fighter on the Eastern Front that it was on the Western Front. Look at what James €œJohnnie€ Johnson (No. 1 British ace of World War II) wrote in his memoirs: €œ . . . When the flight control officer told me that a group of enemy fighters had been spotted up ahead, I tried to avoid combat if the sun and altitude did not give us an opportunity for a surprise attack. The superiority of the Focke-Wulf over our Spitfires was too great in the spring of 1943.€ (James E. Johnson, The Best British Ace, Moscow: €œAST€, 2002). And Johnson flew the Spitfire Vb, an aircraft that in the West was considered better than the P-40 and also better than the P-39.
Even if one considers the fact that on the Eastern Front the Fokkers were often piloted by fighter-bomber pilots, who had not distinguished themselves in fighter combat, just the same this does not explain the difference in the evaluations of the effectiveness of the FW-190.

N.G. Well, perhaps the answer is rooted in the difference in employment of the Fokker. The Fokkers in our theater were employed as a front-line fighter and fighter bomber, and in the West as interceptors.
It might be that the whole explanation can lay in radar support. In the West, Fokkers were vectored by radar; that is, by the time that contact occurred the Fokkers had managed to acquire speed and to gain altitude superiority. In this case, the low acceleration rate of the Fokker did not play any special role because it had already acquired speed and altitude. The Germans were still less likely to conduct a prolonged maneuver battle.
On our front the Germans did not have the kind of radar support density that they enjoyed in the West. Both we and the Germans, on the whole, used visual means to detect the enemy. You fly and you look around. If you spot something, go to full power and engage it. In conditions of the absence of radar vectoring, the dynamic of acceleration played a crucial role in the most rapid achievement of maximum speed. The Fokker was just mediocre in this respect.
As far as I can recall, when the Germans began to employ the Fokker in the West as a fighter bomber, they also began to suffer heavier losses.

A.S. Did you ever have occasion to encounter the €œground attack€ variant FW-190F in battle and how did you evaluate it?

N.G. The one carrying bombs? Yes, I encountered it and shot it down.
While it was carrying external stores this aircraft, of course, was €œharmless€; but after it had dropped its ordnance it was a standard Fokker, no better and no worse.
Recall that I have already told you how we were covering patrol torpedo boats. I misspoke, actually I didn€t tell you the whole story. Six FW-190s with bombs were attacking the PT boats and six Bf-109Fs were providing cover to them.
We had my flight of six and a pair led by Vitya Maksimovich. The Fokkers went low and the Messers flew 500 meters [1600 feet] above them. I set up a good attack. We came out of the sun, and with this advantage all six of us struck first at the Messers. I shot down one, rocketed past them and immediately, in a continuation of the attack, shot down a Fokker. We zoomed upward like on a child€s swing, into the sun. We were on top of the Messers again! It turned out very well. We dispersed the Messers and the Fokkers (dropping their bombs into the sea) also scattered in all directions. We hit them again from above. We chased them all over the place.
Altogether I shot down three in this engagement, but another pilot also shot at one of them and they counted this one toward his score.

A.S. Nikolay Gerasimovich, you constantly say that the basic Soviet fighters, the Yak and the Lavochkin, were equal to the German fighters in speed, although reference books contradict this. According to reference data, German aircraft always have superiority in speed. How do you explain this difference between reference data and practical data?

N.G. Reference data is obtained under ideal conditions, in €œideal€ aircraft. Tactical and technical characteristics are always lower under actual use conditions."

-----------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------

Golodnikovs view on specs in books....from
interview 3.
http://lend-lease.airforce.ru/english/articles/golodnikov/part3.htm


"A. S. Nikolay Gerasimovich, if you look at any reference book, the superiority in speed of German aircraft€"the Bf-109G and FW-190€"is indisputable. Minimum 20€"25 kilometers at low altitudes and up to 80€"100 kilometers at high altitudes. And you say ours did not lag behind?

N. G. No, some difference in speed always exists. At low altitudes we were a bit faster, at high altitudes they were. The difference was on the order of 10€"20 km. But this difference was not so great that it ensured overwhelming superiority. In combat it was practically not discernible.

A. S. Nikolay Gerasimovich, sometime relatively long ago I was speaking with a pilot€"a frontline veteran. Right after the war they flew in captured aircraft. And no matter how hard they tried, they were unable to attain the speeds the Germans had written in their specifications. The shortfall in speed was significant. In the end, they prevailed upon a German, a high-level specialist, and asked him, €œWhy this shortfall in speed? Are we using the engine€s capability incorrectly?€ His response was that they would never achieve the target speed, because the German specifications showed the theoretical speed, and they were attempting to attain that speed on their instruments.

Nikolay Gerasimovich, in your view, is this possible?

N. G. Of course. We had a group of specialists with us from NII VVS. They were examining specifications and were looking at speed. €œWhat speed is indicated at 7,000 meters? 780? Take away 100. And what about 3,000 meters? 700? Reduce it 70 km.€ This is how they calculated the instrumented speed and, characteristically, almost always hit their target. Perhaps they knew something about our focus on speed."

JV44Rall
07-05-2005, 11:05 PM
Hristo is, as usual, right on. Especially the last bit - unless you are working with someone to watch your six, disengage and run early.

If you don't score on the first pass and have a HUGE energy advantage, you can probably climb and attack again. If you don't score then, run! You might not think so, but your energy advantage is nearly gone.

In Oleg's world, "Anton" is German for "energy bleed".

WOLFMondo
07-06-2005, 01:07 AM
Originally posted by VF-29_Sandman:
but the mirror will also eat into ur fps.

hardly makes a difference to me with my x800xt pci-e http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

mynameisroland
07-07-2005, 02:44 PM
Originally posted by F19_Ob:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by mynameisroland:

It is well known that most Fw 190's used on the eastern front were Schlachtgeschwader AC or derated versions akin to what we have in game (for the A4 model derated from 1.42 boost) So perhaps the Fw's encountered and reported on and captured 'were not performing to factory spec' because they were not fighter versions maybe?


I think all 4 articles are pretty interesting. well worth contemplating. Lots of text though.


He also met the bomber version of fw190.
---------------------------------------------
"While it was carrying external stores this aircraft, of course, was €œharmless€; but after it had dropped its ordnance it was a standard Fokker, no better and no worse."
----------------------------------------------

Sure there were derated and worn out planes on all sides. Rookie pilots aswell as experts.
Golodnikow explains why the planes didn't meet specs.
---------------------------------------------
"You can try, but it is a difficult and thankless task to compare the combat qualities of aircraft using reference book data. There are simply too many nuances to consider."
----------------------------------------------

Quote from 4:th article.
http://lend-lease.airforce.ru/english/articles/golodnikov/part4.htm

"A.S. Nikolay Gerasimovich, you have told us a great deal but nonetheless have not explained the principal reason why the Fokker did not become the €œbe all and end all€ fighter on the Eastern Front that it was on the Western Front. Look at what James €œJohnnie€ Johnson (No. 1 British ace of World War II) wrote in his memoirs: €œ . . . When the flight control officer told me that a group of enemy fighters had been spotted up ahead, I tried to avoid combat if the sun and altitude did not give us an opportunity for a surprise attack. The superiority of the Focke-Wulf over our Spitfires was too great in the spring of 1943.€ (James E. Johnson, The Best British Ace, Moscow: €œAST€, 2002). And Johnson flew the Spitfire Vb, an aircraft that in the West was considered better than the P-40 and also better than the P-39.
Even if one considers the fact that on the Eastern Front the Fokkers were often piloted by fighter-bomber pilots, who had not distinguished themselves in fighter combat, just the same this does not explain the difference in the evaluations of the effectiveness of the FW-190.

N.G. Well, perhaps the answer is rooted in the difference in employment of the Fokker. The Fokkers in our theater were employed as a front-line fighter and fighter bomber, and in the West as interceptors.
It might be that the whole explanation can lay in radar support. In the West, Fokkers were vectored by radar; that is, by the time that contact occurred the Fokkers had managed to acquire speed and to gain altitude superiority. In this case, the low acceleration rate of the Fokker did not play any special role because it had already acquired speed and altitude. The Germans were still less likely to conduct a prolonged maneuver battle.
On our front the Germans did not have the kind of radar support density that they enjoyed in the West. Both we and the Germans, on the whole, used visual means to detect the enemy. You fly and you look around. If you spot something, go to full power and engage it. In conditions of the absence of radar vectoring, the dynamic of acceleration played a crucial role in the most rapid achievement of maximum speed. The Fokker was just mediocre in this respect.
As far as I can recall, when the Germans began to employ the Fokker in the West as a fighter bomber, they also began to suffer heavier losses.

A.S. Did you ever have occasion to encounter the €œground attack€ variant FW-190F in battle and how did you evaluate it?

N.G. The one carrying bombs? Yes, I encountered it and shot it down.
While it was carrying external stores this aircraft, of course, was €œharmless€; but after it had dropped its ordnance it was a standard Fokker, no better and no worse.
Recall that I have already told you how we were covering patrol torpedo boats. I misspoke, actually I didn€t tell you the whole story. Six FW-190s with bombs were attacking the PT boats and six Bf-109Fs were providing cover to them.
We had my flight of six and a pair led by Vitya Maksimovich. The Fokkers went low and the Messers flew 500 meters [1600 feet] above them. I set up a good attack. We came out of the sun, and with this advantage all six of us struck first at the Messers. I shot down one, rocketed past them and immediately, in a continuation of the attack, shot down a Fokker. We zoomed upward like on a child€s swing, into the sun. We were on top of the Messers again! It turned out very well. We dispersed the Messers and the Fokkers (dropping their bombs into the sea) also scattered in all directions. We hit them again from above. We chased them all over the place.
Altogether I shot down three in this engagement, but another pilot also shot at one of them and they counted this one toward his score.

A.S. Nikolay Gerasimovich, you constantly say that the basic Soviet fighters, the Yak and the Lavochkin, were equal to the German fighters in speed, although reference books contradict this. According to reference data, German aircraft always have superiority in speed. How do you explain this difference between reference data and practical data?

N.G. Reference data is obtained under ideal conditions, in €œideal€ aircraft. Tactical and technical characteristics are always lower under actual use conditions."

-----------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------

Golodnikovs view on specs in books....from
interview 3.
http://lend-lease.airforce.ru/english/articles/golodnikov/part3.htm


"A. S. Nikolay Gerasimovich, if you look at any reference book, the superiority in speed of German aircraft€"the Bf-109G and FW-190€"is indisputable. Minimum 20€"25 kilometers at low altitudes and up to 80€"100 kilometers at high altitudes. And you say ours did not lag behind?

N. G. No, some difference in speed always exists. At low altitudes we were a bit faster, at high altitudes they were. The difference was on the order of 10€"20 km. But this difference was not so great that it ensured overwhelming superiority. In combat it was practically not discernible.

A. S. Nikolay Gerasimovich, sometime relatively long ago I was speaking with a pilot€"a frontline veteran. Right after the war they flew in captured aircraft. And no matter how hard they tried, they were unable to attain the speeds the Germans had written in their specifications. The shortfall in speed was significant. In the end, they prevailed upon a German, a high-level specialist, and asked him, €œWhy this shortfall in speed? Are we using the engine€s capability incorrectly?€ His response was that they would never achieve the target speed, because the German specifications showed the theoretical speed, and they were attempting to attain that speed on their instruments.

Nikolay Gerasimovich, in your view, is this possible?

N. G. Of course. We had a group of specialists with us from NII VVS. They were examining specifications and were looking at speed. €œWhat speed is indicated at 7,000 meters? 780? Take away 100. And what about 3,000 meters? 700? Reduce it 70 km.€ This is how they calculated the instrumented speed and, characteristically, almost always hit their target. Perhaps they knew something about our focus on speed." </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

interesting interview thanks for posting it.

From what i have read the FW would have been better used as a fighter on the eastern front as its performance excelled at the altitudes prevalent in this theatre yet in the West it suceeded fighting against opponents out of its ideal performance envelope.

PapaFly
07-08-2005, 01:32 AM
The best tip for flying the A9 is simple: DONT FLY IT!
I'm a dedicated 190 jock from day 1, but as it is now, they modeled a high-alt prop on the A9 (or so they say).
The result is the plane is considerably worse than the A8 at BnZ. It has a very narrow margin over the A8 in top-speed, but it takes ages to reach it. A8 will accelerate faster from 0-500kph. When doing consecutive zooms and dives on your enemy the A9 puts ya into trouble because of its slow acceleration. Plus it turns slower than the A8. These are not vague assumptions, I tested all late-war wulfs.
In an A8 you can absolutely own the Yak3. Your most difficult opponents are La7 and the Pony.
Whenever i have the choice i man the A8.

Lucius_Esox
07-08-2005, 07:30 AM
I fly a spit online almost excusively, for my own reasons.

The guys above know what they are talking about. If a 190 is flown properly against me I am in trouble. He wont come anywhere near my planes "kill" performance area. I am reduced to making him make a mistake (wont tell what i got my peashooters set at to do this) If he doesnt respond, i.e. he knows what he is doing, I run!!

AerialTarget
07-08-2005, 07:48 AM
Originally posted by F19_Ob:
A. S. Nikolay Gerasimovich, sometime relatively long ago I was speaking with a pilot€"a frontline veteran. Right after the war they flew in captured aircraft. And no matter how hard they tried, they were unable to attain the speeds the Germans had written in their specifications. The shortfall in speed was significant. In the end, they prevailed upon a German, a high-level specialist, and asked him, €œWhy this shortfall in speed? Are we using the engine€s capability incorrectly?€ His response was that they would never achieve the target speed, because the German specifications showed the theoretical speed, and they were attempting to attain that speed on their instruments.

Nikolay Gerasimovich, in your view, is this possible?

N. G. Of course. We had a group of specialists with us from NII VVS. They were examining specifications and were looking at speed. €œWhat speed is indicated at 7,000 meters? 780? Take away 100. And what about 3,000 meters? 700? Reduce it 70 km.€ This is how they calculated the instrumented speed and, characteristically, almost always hit their target. Perhaps they knew something about our focus on speed."

Doesn't he mean add one hundred and add seventy? True airspeed is higher than indicated.

whiteladder
07-08-2005, 07:51 AM
If I`m bnz ina 190 should I set the convergence to a higher value. I currently use 200 for most aircraft, but should I increase this for Bnz?

PapaFly
07-08-2005, 08:27 AM
no ladder, i've my convergence set at 150m.
the point is, when you do proper bnz you gotta be really fast. most of my one-pass kills happen at a speed difference of at least 100kph, up to 400kph. i fully focus on that moment of merge, the moment when i am at 150m behind my enemy i must have him clearly in my gunsight. all i do is give him a short burst, no time for more, but well-aimed, from close distance. deadly stuff.
you increase your convergence you gotta be really **** good at aiming. my hit percentage in the 190 is at around 12%, and around half of my kills happen in one pass, without being seen by the bandit.

convergence set to far is good for slow planes unable to follow faster enemies. but the wulf-mentality means you dictate the fight, you hunt you enemy down, anytime, anywhere. you get close and shoot at his neck. basically it comes close to an execution. and the MK108 is the pistol, lol. On the other hand, if you're in a position that you can't dictate the fight, stay away from it, gain altitude, position yourself properly, and then let the massacre begin, mwuhahahaahahahaahahaaa!

Pirschjaeger
07-09-2005, 06:01 PM
Originally posted by PapaFly:
The best tip for flying the A9 is simple: DONT FLY IT!
I'm a dedicated 190 jock from day 1, but as it is now, they modeled a high-alt prop on the A9 (or so they say).
The result is the plane is considerably worse than the A8 at BnZ. It has a very narrow margin over the A8 in top-speed, but it takes ages to reach it. A8 will accelerate faster from 0-500kph. When doing consecutive zooms and dives on your enemy the A9 puts ya into trouble because of its slow acceleration. Plus it turns slower than the A8. These are not vague assumptions, I tested all late-war wulfs.
In an A8 you can absolutely own the Yak3. Your most difficult opponents are La7 and the Pony.
Whenever i have the choice i man the A8.

I used to fly the Fw A5. I got used to it and did quite well. Then, one day, I was reading the specs of the various 190's. I noticed that although the A4 had the lowest hp rating but the power/weight ratio was the best of all the 190s. This was important to me because of my flying style.

I normally work alone online. I will assist my team mates but there are few that fly as I do, so I'm usally flying lonewolf. Patience is the biggest and most important asset to a 190 pilot. When you see players' stats, you know who is patient and who isn't. When your deaths equal your kills(long term), you are a cowboy. Cowboys don't have patience, they only have guns.

My nickname is "Pirschj¤ger". It means "Stalker" or "Hunter/Stalker". This is my fighting style and I have a lot of practice landing. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

A trick I like to use sometimes and have had a lot of luck with is, IMHO, is the best offense to the most common defensive move used by those trying to survive the BnZ attack. The most commonly used defense against your BnZ attacker is the prey will wait until the BnZer is within firing range, then suddenly turn, making the BnZer have to extend or try to turn, thus bleeding his energy.

Let the prey do this on your first pass. Don't worry, he'll probably try it a second time. On the second pass, and this can be dangerous, lower your speed. When you are in range and when he turns, your speed is low enough that you can turn with him and take him out. This goes back the the A4.

I like to BnZ or TnB equally. The A4 is a nice plane for this. Its engine is not powerful but I find the maneuvering abilities make up for the power loss. I feel the A4 gives me more choices and possibilties than any or the other 190's.

Back to the original question, most people always say energy is the most important asset but I tend to disagree. Without patience you will lose your energy, you will make bad decisions, your KungFu(strategy) will be weak, you will get killed. Patients is everything.

I haven't flown for about 9 months now. I have a new "uber" pc sitting in various boxes and will be up and running in about two weeks. Now there's the new FM. Can't wait to be a noob again. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif In two weeks. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

Fritz