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View Full Version : PTO/S.E. Asia WWII AirCombat Quiz Thread II......



LEBillfish
02-17-2007, 09:30 AM
Okie Dokie, restarting this here just in case...

Hi All;

In another forum I frequent they run threads in each specific area that seem to be quite popular. The Forum area the limiting factor for the discussion, and it played much like a game. It looks like a lot of fun, plus (heaven forbid) folks seem to learn from them so what say we give it a roll.

PTO/S.E. Asia WWII AirCombat Quiz Thread......RULES:
1. All questions will only pertain to Pacific/S.E.Area Theatre of operations in WWII and prior (1931-1945).
2. All questions must be limited to AirCombat, the Aircraft, Units, Personnel, Actions, Tactics, Markings, Ordinance, Bases, etc..
3. The current winner will post a question, anyone may try and answer it, yet the question poster will announce who came up with the correct answer first, then pass the thread off to that winner, hopefully elaborating on any additional info.
4. The new winner MUST post within 48 hours their new question or it reverts back to the previous.
5. If the answer is not given in 96 hours, the one posing it may answer and post another or let it continue on if it is gaining responses.
6. The one posing the question is welcome to post as many hints as they feel is needed as it moves along.

The point is NOT so much to come up with rediculously difficult or complex questions, yet to build a very large thread wherein trivia of PTO/S.E. Asia WWII AirCombat can be discussed inspiring further investigation...

The next two posts will give an example then I'll post the lead question. Good Luck! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

LEBillfish
02-17-2007, 09:31 AM
Which unit was the first to use the Ki-44 on operations, and what was the locale?

LEBillfish
02-17-2007, 09:31 AM
47th Dokuritsu Chutai formed to test the Ki-44 in action November 1941 in Tachikawa from personnel of the of the Flight Test Center flying prototype and pre-production aircraft.....Also known as the Shinsengumi (Silverberry perhaps?) or Kawasemi (Kingfisher) Unit eventually becoming the 47th Hikousentai.

Bases list as;
Tachikawa Nov-Dec.1941
Saigon & Bangkok Dec. 1941
Kuantan, Malaya Jan.-Mar. 1942
Then Burma and on.

From Japanese Army Air Force Fighter Units and their Aces 1931-1945, by Hata-Izawa-Shores, ISBN1-902304-89-6

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/47th.jpg

LEBillfish
02-17-2007, 09:41 AM
First Question!

In Dennis Rodman's A War of Their Own (pdf) (http://aupress.au.af.mil/Books/Rodman/rodman.pdf) , it is discussed how critical it was to cut the shipping supply line to New Guinea to win the war there. Many methods for every aircraft including B17's were developed for both high and low altitude attacks.....and though "skip bombing" was well used,

"What was a "Masthead" type of attack, and how and why did it vairy"?

(feel free to paste here any drawings you can cut and paste to answer)

LEBillfish
02-19-2007, 08:34 AM
Failure by anyone to answer this question due to the FREE PDF book included (which is an outstanding bit of work)...Results in your Ki-27 being corrupted on your disk.

JarheadEd
02-19-2007, 09:52 AM
Originally posted by LEBillfish:
Failure by anyone to answer this question due to the FREE PDF book included (which is an outstanding bit of work)...Results in your Ki-27 being corrupted on your disk.

The Ki-27 I'll give up. If it had been Claude,...(Lord I wish That was flyable)


Thanks for the book. I'm still reading it. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Blutarski2004
02-19-2007, 10:24 AM
Originally posted by LEBillfish:
First Question!

In Dennis Rodman's A War of Their Own (pdf) (http://aupress.au.af.mil/Books/Rodman/rodman.pdf) , it is discussed how critical it was to cut the shipping supply line to New Guinea to win the war there. Many methods for every aircraft including B17's were developed for both high and low altitude attacks.....and though "skip bombing" was well used,

"What was a "Masthead" type of attack, and how and why did it vairy"?

(feel free to paste here any drawings you can cut and paste to answer)


..... 5th AF developed a technique of VERY low level attack against Japanese shipping. The bomber (B25s typically) would attack on the beam of the target ship at a height of ship's masthead level or less, drop their bomb(s) and seek to "skip" them off the surface of the sea and into the side of the target ship. The bombs were on a delay fuze setting intended to detonate after the bomb had passed through the ship's side.

Large numbers of nose-mounted 50's were used for flak suppression by the attackinbg bombers.

DxyFlyr
02-19-2007, 11:59 AM
So, Did he write this book before or after dating Madonna? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif




Originally posted by LEBillfish:
First Question!

In Dennis Rodman's A War of Their Own (pdf) (http://aupress.au.af.mil/Books/Rodman/rodman.pdf) , it is discussed how critical it was to cut the shipping supply line to New Guinea to win the war there. Many methods for every aircraft including B17's were developed for both high and low altitude attacks.....and though "skip bombing" was well used,

"What was a "Masthead" type of attack, and how and why did it vairy"?

(feel free to paste here any drawings you can cut and paste to answer)

LEBillfish
02-19-2007, 07:35 PM
Originally posted by Blutarski2004:
..... 5th AF developed a technique of VERY low level attack against Japanese shipping. The bomber (B25s typically) would attack on the beam of the target ship at a height of ship's masthead level or less, drop their bomb(s) and seek to "skip" them off the surface of the sea and into the side of the target ship. The bombs were on a delay fuze setting intended to detonate after the bomb had passed through the ship's side.

Large numbers of nose-mounted 50's were used for flak suppression by the attackinbg bombers.


Kinda sorta, yet not really..........

HOWEVER, in the interests of getting the thread rolling am going to pass it on to Blutarski for the next question....You're up Blutarski!

Masthead bombing was as eluded to to be done at "mast height"...However, skip bombing which had been developed before the war (Kenny even working on some concepts 1939 with the British)...Was for a number of reasons not always that successful.

Rough seas could cause the bomb to skip or dive (and lost a picture I'll try and refind of a "500# skipped bomb" in New Guinea, jumping over a ship, two crewman diving out of the way it missing each by about a yard).......Could bounce back up into the aircraft.....Might not go off due to poor time delay fuses even up till 1943....Or might go off upon contact with the water fragging the plane.

Additionally, initial efforts were done with "B-17's"!!!!....(funny if you think about it http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif)...So new and better methods were developed those being "Masthead Attacks" based upon ship type and intended to strike the ship first, to either penetrate or strike the side and go off below the water line to cause the ship to break due to the loss of support.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/IL2/Masthead.jpg

Feathered_IV
02-20-2007, 12:18 AM
I'll jump in here with a true/false.

Kamikaze pilots had their canopies bolted down to prevent them bailing out or otherwise abandoning their attacks T/F?

harryklein66
02-20-2007, 12:50 AM
F! the Pete,Willow,and Ki 79 had no enclose cockpit ;P

More seriously, the bolted canopies is a myth, in fact many "Kamikaze" rtb when they can't reach the area of their targets due to mechanical failures, or other reasons.
Their purpose was not to die for nothing.

Munenao Nakano is one of those who had to abandoned his mission (3 times ).
That allowed him to survive to the war and to let his memories about those events.

LEBillfish
02-20-2007, 08:44 AM
<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">Sorry guys, yet the thread does not work like that.....

First off, the one posing the question determines a winner and MUST announce who it is.

Then that individual has so much time to post their question or it reverts back to the previous to pose another.

Additionally, both should try and give sources/links/refs. to aid others in their investigations...

Lastly, posts are NOT to be debated by the community, they may add some additional info yet the moment a new question is posed the thread moves on....

So currently it is ***Blutarski's*** turn to post...Lets hear it Blutarski!</span>

Feathered_IV
02-21-2007, 12:33 AM
Ah whoops! Sorry I'm such a quizz nub.

Go for it Blutarski http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Blutarski2004
02-21-2007, 10:05 AM
Sorry about the delay, folks. I didn't read through all the instruction. Typical guy behavior Billfish - my apologies.

Next question -

Pappy Gunn's modification of 5th AF B25,s into gunships is well known. But he was also responsible for devising another important field modification to another model of medium bomber serving with 5th AF.

What was the modification?

What bomber was modified?



Good Luck!

MEGILE
02-21-2007, 10:26 AM
A-20 Havocs

Parafrags

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Blutarski2004
02-21-2007, 11:20 AM
Originally posted by Megile:
A-20 Havocs

Parafrags

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif


..... We have a winner!

ViktorViktor
02-21-2007, 11:20 AM
Wrong order ! Wrong order ! He got them in the wrong order !

The answers are :

paragrags

A-20 Bostons

LEBillfish
02-21-2007, 12:02 PM
The question poser has passed it along to Megile, Megiles turn to post the next question.

(will at the beginning here post a bit of moderation and direction till the flow gets going)...Also, try and add pics, and most deffinately your references folks, both those andswering and those asking the question when they hand it off.

What's your question Megile?

ViktorViktor
02-21-2007, 12:27 PM
Rats.

MEGILE
02-21-2007, 01:49 PM
In 1945, the HMS Victorious (R38) was in her second tour of the Pacific.

Pray tell, what FAA squadrons were aboard, and what planes were they flying?

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

ViktorViktor
02-22-2007, 05:15 AM
You can't keep a good man down !

HMS Victorious [1st CAG]

849 Squadron-Avenger

1834 Squadron-Corsair

1836 Squadron-Corsair

leitmotiv
02-22-2007, 08:45 AM
HA!

luftluuver
02-22-2007, 09:02 AM
HMS Victorious was also called USS ??? but I can't remember the name. Anyone?

LEBillfish, this is not trying to get around your rules.

MEGILE
02-22-2007, 09:10 AM
Originally posted by luftluuver:
HMS Victorious was also called USS ??? but I can't remember the name. Anyone?

LEBillfish, this is not trying to get around your rules.

The USS Robin http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif


Originally posted by ViktorViktor:

You can't keep a good man down !

HMS Victorious [1st CAG]

849 Squadron-Avenger

1834 Squadron-Corsair

1836 Squadron-Corsair

Ding ding din, we have a <span class="ev_code_RED">winnaahhhhhh!</span>

luftluuver
02-22-2007, 09:18 AM
Thanks Megile. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

ViktorViktor
02-22-2007, 12:16 PM
OK, thanks Meguile. I'll get on with the next question, then.

Pappy Boyington led a very interesting life, to say the least. A career marine officer, he resigned his commission in order to fly as a mercenary with the Flying Tigers in China. He shot down 6 planes while there, then returned to the states and parked cars in California for a year while waiting to be recommissioned in the Marines. After being reinstated, he went on to form his own fighter squadron, composed of cast-offs from other squadrons and wannabe fighter pilots. No wonder they called themselves the Black Sheep.

Boyington was shot down Jan 3, 1944 while trying to break the (then) American record for aerial victories (26, set first by Eddie Rickenbacker in WWI). He in fact managed to shoot down 3 Japanese fighters before he himself was shot down, thus (temporarily) setting a new record. Eventually fished out of the ocean by a passing Japanese U-boat, Boyington was delivered to Rabaul and thereafter flown to another Japanese-held island in February.

He arrived at this island just in time to become victim to a massive U.S. Navy aerial attack on said island. This memorable raid is captured on film in the carrier film "The Fighting Lady". In fact, a pit into which Boyington and some fellow prisoners had been shoved seconds before the raid began is clearly visible in film footage actually taken during the middle of the raid. From this pit, Boyington and his fellow prisoners had to endure the bombs and bullets of his fellow countrymen for the next 2 days. (They could not be recognised as Americans from the air.)

Boyington's own reaction, when later viewing together with his wife the film clip from "The Fighting Lady" in which he is present: 'Honey, there's Daddy-O. Give him a hand. What an actor.'

Question : What is the name of the island on which Boyington was unwittingly filmed during the middle of a U.S. Navy raid ?

luftluuver
02-22-2007, 12:20 PM
Truk??

DxyFlyr
02-22-2007, 12:25 PM
Truk

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0036823/trivia

DxyFlyr
02-22-2007, 12:25 PM
Oops, I'm too late.

Marcel_Albert
02-22-2007, 12:30 PM
There is a moving interview with Pappy Boyington here :

http://www.eaf51.org/New_Web/Documenti/Storia/Boyington_ENG.pdf

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

ViktorViktor
02-22-2007, 01:00 PM
Wow, that didn't take long, did it ?

Luftluuver wins by 5 minutes over DxyFlyr.

Your turn Luftluuver.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

luftluuver
02-22-2007, 01:25 PM
Who was awarded the last VC in WW2?

Bonus for describing the action.

DxyFlyr
02-22-2007, 02:10 PM
Robert Hampton Gray?
Canadian

August 9, 1945 Honshu, Japan

Led an attack on a Japanese destroyer, was wounded, crashed, died, but hit his mark sinking the destroyer.


(If Wiki counts...)
http://www.answers.com/topic/robert-hampton-gray

luftluuver
02-22-2007, 05:09 PM
We have a winner. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Your turn DxyFlyr.

BillyTheKid_22
02-22-2007, 07:19 PM
Originally posted by Marcel_Albert:
There is a moving interview with Pappy Boyington here :

http://www.eaf51.org/New_Web/Documenti/Storia/Boyington_ENG.pdf

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif



http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

DxyFlyr
02-23-2007, 07:35 AM
Ok, here goes... I'm having friends over for dinner. How do I mix a Kenney cocktail?

LEBillfish
02-23-2007, 11:23 AM
c'mon guys this an easy one.....not like the .pdf in the first question might have the answer.....

DxyFlyr
02-23-2007, 12:06 PM
Don't make me throw a page number out there.

LEBillfish
02-24-2007, 09:11 AM
From "A War of their Own, Bombers over the SouthWest Pacific, by M.K.Rodman"

""Their construction was simple. The "śKenney Cocktail' . . .was a standard M-47 100-pound bomb loaded with white phosphorus which, when it burst, flung out streamers of burning incendiary material in all directions for 150 feet [fig. 7]. Its effect upon man and machine was deadly."Ł50 Even before the end of 1942, "the Beast,"Ł as Radio Tokyo dubbed Kenney and his air force, would give the Japanese in the Southwest Pacific more cause for concern.""

Photo's from, Warpath Across the Pacific, by L.J.Hickey.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/IL2/pre1_topl.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/IL2/pre1_botr.jpg

F19_Orheim
02-24-2007, 06:38 PM
nasty

DxyFlyr
02-25-2007, 01:01 PM
Yes indeed! Sorry for the delayed response, I've been out of town.

Bf's turn.




Originally posted by LEBillfish:
From "A War of their Own, Bombers over the SouthWest Pacific, by M.K.Rodman"

""Their construction was simple. The "śKenney Cocktail' . . .was a standard M-47 100-pound bomb loaded with white phosphorus which, when it burst, flung out streamers of burning incendiary material in all directions for 150 feet [fig. 7]. Its effect upon man and machine was deadly."Ł50 Even before the end of 1942, "the Beast,"Ł as Radio Tokyo dubbed Kenney and his air force, would give the Japanese in the Southwest Pacific more cause for concern.""

Photo's from, Warpath Across the Pacific, by L.J.Hickey.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/IL2/pre1_topl.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/IL2/pre1_botr.jpg

LEBillfish
02-25-2007, 01:58 PM
Okie dokie............here we go;

The 14th Hikoudan sent to New Guinea to compliment the 4th Koukuugun's forces of the 6th & 7th Hikoushidans` was primarily built around what two Hikousentai, both the first two to utilize the Ki-61 in combat? (the encounter of Doolittle's flight of a Ki-61 unintentional so not counting).

hint, their first combat assignment was New Britain & New Guinea in mid 1943, also their last the units disbanded almost exactly one year later still in New Guinea in mid 1944.

luftluuver
02-25-2007, 06:09 PM
68th and 78th
Both disbanded Aug 20 1944

LEBillfish
02-25-2007, 06:39 PM
luftluuver for the win, passing it to you with a correction......

They were disbanded on July 25th, 1944.....

the 68 & 78th Hikousentai initially were formed in Manchuria to help defend the Russian border. After being retrained to fly Ki-43 to replace their aging Ki-27 of their old units, they were suprisingly shipped back to Japan to receive the great honor of being the first to train in the Ki-61 & utilize it in field trials.

Each group on the way to New Guinea simply due to problems with the aircraft lost roughly >1/4 of their crews....5th Air Force activity once there keeping their numbers often in the single digits.

Both groups permanently disbanded upon the fall of New Guinea.....

References and accounts of both groups can be found in many locations, however it will often take a deep dig to gain any consequential information. Also, many of the encounters with various Ki-43's over New Guinea were actually 68/78th pilots flying their planes when lacking themselves, those groups rotated out.

luftluuver
02-26-2007, 06:10 AM
Ok, where was the 1st flyable (after minor repairs) A6M Zeke captured.

Feathered_IV
02-26-2007, 06:24 AM
Hmm, tricky. I'd say Koga's Zero in the Aleutians. But then again, I did see one in CAF markings...

Ah what the heck. I'll say the Aleutians. Akutan Island to be precise.

leitmotiv
02-26-2007, 06:26 AM
Aleutians. Koga's aircraft which flipped over and killed him when he made an emergency landing. June 1942. Taken to San Diego NAS for testing after being discovered by a PBY.

leitmotiv
02-26-2007, 06:28 AM
Bugger. Beaten to the draw by FIV!!!!

luftluuver
02-26-2007, 06:37 AM
Nope, not the Aluetian Zeke.

harryklein66
02-26-2007, 06:48 AM
In China : http://www.j-aircraft.com/research/WarPrizes.htm

luftluuver
02-26-2007, 07:14 AM
Yes Harry. Knew someone would check out j-aircraft. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

harryklein66
02-26-2007, 07:28 AM
I know this for long, but I've thought it was faster to post this link, than scanning my doc http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

LEBillfish
02-26-2007, 02:44 PM
Guys make it clear who answered correctly and both elaborate on it a bit if you would....Then make it clear who the thread is being handed to.

HarryKlein66, believe your turn to ask a question.....

harryklein66
02-26-2007, 03:55 PM
Ok so my question is :
what was the first airforce to perform a raid over japan ?

leitmotiv
02-26-2007, 04:45 PM
Chinese. Circa 1937.

harryklein66
02-26-2007, 05:24 PM
Chinese correct http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

On May 20, 1938, six TB-3 4 M-34R took off of Changa´ then, crossing the Eastern China Sea, reached Japan from which they flew over the island of Kyushu from South to North before returning at their base. The TB-3 did not release bombs, but leaflets on the towns of Nagasaki, Sasebo and ***uoka.

So It's Leitmotiv turn to ask a question.

leitmotiv
02-26-2007, 09:41 PM
Sod me. So that's why the ICM 1:72 TB-3 in Chinese markings was made. I read about the mission and assumed it was flown by SBs.

In early 1943, the Japanese G4M "Betty" bombers had one last hoorah where they managed to inflict a humiliating defeat on the USN. What was the name of the battle, and what was the nature of the humiliation?

SithSpeeder
02-26-2007, 09:58 PM
By early 1943 the Japanese Navy had developed new techniques for night torpedo attack. These were put into effect on the night of 29/30 January 1943 in the Battle of Rennell Island, in which Betties torpedoed and sank the heavy cruiser Chicago. G4Ms repeatedly harassed US task groups in night attacks from this time until almost the end of the war, occasionally inflicting heavy damage - for example in February 1944 when a Betty torpedoed the Essex Class carrier Intrepid after Task Force 58's raid on the Japanese base of Truk in the Caroline Islands.

That one?

* _54th_Speeder *

leitmotiv
02-26-2007, 10:19 PM
Superb work, SithSpeeder (17 minutes!!!!!)! It's your shot!

SithSpeeder
02-26-2007, 10:42 PM
That was an interesting find/read about the Betty--good stuff.

Who was credited with ordering kamikaze attacks, how did he die, and what will did he leave behind?

* _54th_Speeder *

P.S. Bill...thanks for sharing this idea with us here, it's a good one.

leitmotiv
02-26-2007, 11:20 PM
Vice-Admiral Onishi ordered the first attacks during the October 1944 Battle of Leyte Gulf. He committed seppuku at the end of the war to atone for ordering the Kamikaze missions. He did not allow himself to be beheaded to end the pain, as was customary, thus his agonizing death lasted hours. In his will he urged the young Japanerse to rebuild Japan and to work for peace among nations.

SithSpeeder
02-26-2007, 11:27 PM
Well done, Leitmotiv! A very concise answer. You, sir, are up next (and I am off to bed).

For those who would like more details...

From http://members.iinet.net.au/~gduncan/1944.html (http://members.iinet.net.au/%7Egduncan/1944.html)

SUICIDE ATTACKS

Prior to the proposed invasion of mainland Japan ('Operation 'Olympic' on November 1, 1945) the Japanese military speeded up its preparations to attack the Allied invasion force while still at sea, coming up with some very desperate ideas for suicide attacks of differing kinds:

* Thousands of volunteer pilots were hastily trained for airplane suicide attacks. Over 500 aircraft of all types were available for these kamikaze missions.
* Around 400 Koryu and Kairyu suicide submarines (five and two-man versions of the Kaiten) would set out on their one-way journey.
* Also prepared to sacrifice their lives were 300 volunteers for the Shinyo human torpedoes.
* Most bizarre of all were the hundreds of strong swimmers who would swim out with deadly mines strapped to their backs to explode against the hulls of the Allied ships.

Just when all was set for the greatest military mass suicide in history, the atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki and Hiroshima. On August 14, 1945, the Japanese ordered all kamikaze operations to cease. The originator of the first kamikaze attack, Vice Admiral Takijiro Ohnishi, committed suicide by disembowelling himself. By the end of the Pacific war on September 2, 1945, a grand total of 1,228 Japanese suicide pilots had given their lives for their Emperor. Their score was 34 US ships sunk and 288 damaged. These included three escort carriers and fourteen destroyers. No battleships or cruisers were sunk.

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takijiro_Onishi

Takijiro Onishi committed ritual suicide (Seppuku) in his quarters on August 16, 1945, following the unconditional surrender of Japan. His suicide note apologized to the approximately 4000 pilots whom he had sent to their deaths, and urged all young civilians who had survived the war to work towards the rebuilding of Japan and peace among nations. He also stated that he would offer his death as a penance to the kamikaze pilots and their families. Accordingly, he did not use a kaishakunin (second), and died of self-inflicted injuries over a period of 15 hours.

A kaishakunin is an appointed second whose duty is to behead one who has committed seppuku at the moment of agony.

Aside from the purpose of being spared prolonged anguish until death, both the condemned and those on hand to observe are spared the spectacle of the writhing death throes that would ensue. The use of a kaishakunin is normally reserved for one who is performing the deed out of honor, rather than in disgrace. For example, a warlord who is defeated in battle and has chosen to commit seppuku might be appointed a second so that he may die respectably, as opposed to a samurai who has been ordered to die for some crime, or for having disgraced his clan through dishonorable deeds.

With regards to his will, please visit (a short read): http://www.geocities.co.jp/WallStreet-Stock/6210/Thelas...lTakijiroOnishi.html (http://www.geocities.co.jp/WallStreet-Stock/6210/ThelastwillTakijiroOnishi.html)

* _54th_Speeder *

leitmotiv
02-26-2007, 11:35 PM
Cheers, Ace!

Name the bloody, barbaric air-sea battle which saw merciless treatment of survivors by the Allied air forces---the notorious Battle of the ____ Sea.

WTE_Moleboy
02-27-2007, 01:43 AM
Battle of Bismarck sea?

leitmotiv
02-27-2007, 03:35 AM
You got it!

http://www.abc.net.au/lateline/content/2003/hc13.htm

WTE_Moleboy
02-27-2007, 04:09 AM
Thanks Leitmotiv

The last Aerial action of World War 2, several days after the official Japanese surrender involved which obscure bomber?

stathem
02-27-2007, 04:31 AM
The B-32 Dominator.

Do you need me to google and post the Action?

WTE_Moleboy
02-27-2007, 05:13 AM
Nice one Stathem!
Some info about the action in this thread

http://www.ww2aircraft.net/forum/aviation/too-little-to...-dominator-1775.html (http://www.ww2aircraft.net/forum/aviation/too-little-too-late-b-32-dominator-1775.html)

stathem
02-27-2007, 06:16 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Thanks! I'd seen that before, probably in these forums.

Here goes:

Frank śChota' Carey was a well known BoB ace who in January 1942 was posted with his 135 Squadron to Burma. Based in Rangoon, he scored his first Japanese kill, a Ki-43 Oscar, on the 29th January 1942.

He served the rest of the war in the South East Asia, ending up as one of the top British Aces of WW2, and a Group Captain.

What was it,specifically, about him that earned him the epithet śChota'?

And for an unnecessary bonus point, what language does śChota' come from.

leitmotiv
02-27-2007, 07:19 AM
"Chota" Hindi:"small." Carey received the name due to his size. See new Norman Franks bio:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Frank-Chota-Carey-Story-Silver/...0651?ie=UTF8&s=books (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Frank-Chota-Carey-Story-Silver/dp/1904943381/sr=1-1/qid=1172586343/ref=sr_1_1/202-1853476-7100651?ie=UTF8&s=books)

Just call me pukka sahib!

stathem
02-27-2007, 07:51 AM
One Egg Banjo for leitmotiv Sahib http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Saw that about the book researching the question, I think I might have to get that, didn't notice it was new.

Your it.

leitmotiv
02-27-2007, 08:50 AM
Cheerio stathem!

Name the most antiquated, ramshackle strike aircraft in the Far East in December 1941.

stathem
02-27-2007, 08:53 AM
I'm going to go for Vickers Vildebeest. At a guess.

leitmotiv
02-27-2007, 10:26 AM
What else could it be? Poor buggers!

http://www.jaapteeuwen.com/ww2aircraft/html%20pages/VICKERS%20VILDEBEEST.htm

Your ball, stathem!

stathem
02-27-2007, 10:35 AM
OK, quick one, got to go now,

What would have been the type code (? - ie D3A1, A6M5 - that bit) of the smaller version of the Aichi D3A (Val) with retractable landing gear, developed by Nakajima but not put into production?

SithSpeeder
02-27-2007, 11:38 AM
D3N1?

* _54th_Speeder *

stathem
02-27-2007, 11:43 AM
Spot on Speeder!

Did you know it or derive it?

..and the ball's with you.

harryklein66
02-27-2007, 11:52 AM
I think it was the Nakajima D3N1, but it's
not a version of the Aichi Val, it's his competitor to answer the 11-Shi specification.

Edit...outch! too slow ^^

SithSpeeder
02-27-2007, 11:58 AM
Sorry, Harry!

Derived it, unfortunately (didn't know about details of the development...found a good site though, ...in polish http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif can anyone translate ? http://www.samoloty.ow.pl/str252.htm) Apparently, the N is for Nakajima and M was for Mitsubishi (the two losers in the competition).

Anyways, next question.

What is the complete list of Japanese aircraft known to have bombed the Hawaiian islands in WW2?

* _54th_Speeder *

leitmotiv
02-27-2007, 12:07 PM
D3A1, B5N2, H8K1

stathem
02-27-2007, 12:08 PM
Yep, sorry, it makes perfect sense that it was a competitor; it was written as 'version of' in the book I got the question from (might be a use of language thing) and I was in a bit of a rush and didn't have time to research the question futher.

SithSpeeder
02-27-2007, 12:11 PM
Aaaah, you got it (fastest one yet, methinks)! I was trying to be tricky with the H8K1 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif . Did you know that off the top of your head?

Info on the lesser known raid of March 4-5, 1942: http://members.aol.com/jhmcgoran/pearl_harbor_2.html

Your bailiwick, Leitmotiv. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

* _54th_Speeder *

harryklein66
02-27-2007, 12:20 PM
Originally posted by SithSpeeder:
Apparently, the N is for Nakajima and M was for Mitsubishi (the two losers in the competition)

Yes the third letter in the IJN aircraft designation is for the builder

luftluuver
02-27-2007, 01:11 PM
Japanese Aircraft Designations 1939-1945

http://rwebs.net/avhistory/acdesig/japanese.htm

leitmotiv
02-27-2007, 06:18 PM
Why did many USN Wildcat pilots consider the six .50 cal., folding wing F4F-4 a retrograde step from the F4F-3?

horseback
02-27-2007, 06:40 PM
Fewer rounds, less firing time, and a heavier, less maneuverable aircraft. And it meant that since the carrier could carry more fighters, the squadron ready room was more crowded.

cheers

horseback

SithSpeeder
02-27-2007, 06:45 PM
Seems that the six guns were spread across the same amount of ammo, reducing firing time. Also, the folding wing added weight, hence decreasing aircraft performance.

Good one!

EDIT: HOrseback beat me to the punch.

* _54th_Speeder *

horseback
02-27-2007, 07:00 PM
The Pacific war introduced a number of Naval innovations for the purpose of defending against air attack. One of those innovations was a class of cruisers devoted solely to defending the task group from aerial attack.

Name the cruiser class.

cheers

horseback

SithSpeeder
02-27-2007, 10:35 PM
Atlanta Class (CL-51 through 54) cruisers had 12 5" anti-aircraft guns. (that took some digging) Off to bed for now.

* _54th_Speeder *

leitmotiv
02-28-2007, 12:33 AM
Correct, hossback! See THE FIRST TEAM, Lundstrom.

luftluuver
02-28-2007, 04:53 AM
The British Dido class AA cruisers predates the American Atlanta class AA cruisers.

HMS Dido was laid down Aug 30 1937 while the USS Atlanta was laid down Apr 27 1940.

The Alanta class was designed with 16 5" guns (2x8).

Cruisers of WW2 MJ Whitley

SithSpeeder
03-01-2007, 07:49 AM
In the interest of keeping the thread moving (i.e., on the first page or so), I'm taking it upon myself to declare luftluuver correct in technicality. So if you see this, it's your ball.

Otherwise, I'll post a question in a few hours time (I got a couple goodies! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/typing.gif )

* _54th_Speeder *

luftluuver
03-01-2007, 09:40 AM
Post your question SithSpeeder.

SithSpeeder
03-01-2007, 10:00 AM
What Axis country during WW2 flew Curtiss Hawk fighters and Martin bombers?

* _54th_Speeder *

harryklein66
03-01-2007, 10:45 AM
Siam/Thailand
http://www.dmbcrtaf.thaigov.net/aircraft/Fighter/Hawk75/hawk75.htm
http://airforce.thaiembdc.org/gallery/past6.htm

SithSpeeder
03-01-2007, 11:04 AM
HK FTW! Yours!

More detail for those that like pics and a bit of history:
Check out: http://www.airliners.net/open.file/392600/L/ for a cool picture of the Hawk III biplane
and: http://www.airliners.net/open.file/1174593/L/ for one of the Hawk 75N monoplane
And see: http://world.std.com/~ted7/minorafp.htm#thai (http://world.std.com/%7Eted7/minorafp.htm#thai) for a short history and a detailed breakdown of their small airforce.

* _54th_Speeder *

harryklein66
03-01-2007, 11:42 AM
On 19 June 1944, the Taiho CV was saved from a torpedo launch by the USS Albacore, How ?

SithSpeeder
03-01-2007, 11:56 AM
From a bit of poking, it appears that the Albacore torpedo launch DID sink the Taiho (although not immediately, on that same day).

However, I think you are referring to the following: "Sakio Komatsu had just taken off when he saw the torpedo wakes and deliberately dived his plane on the path of a torpedo in a vain attempt to save his ship."

* _54th_Speeder *

harryklein66
03-01-2007, 12:39 PM
Yes you are correct http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
The Albacore launch 6 torpedo on the Taiho, but had to do it at guess, because his trajectory calculator was not working properly.On this 6 torpedo only one hit the Taiho causing minor damage (in a certain way...), one was disable by the crew Yukio Komatsu/Mannkichi Kunitsugu, the 4 other missed.

The Taiho was finally destroyed because fuel vapor ignites , result of the USS Albacore attack.

SithSpeeder
03-01-2007, 01:53 PM
OK, here's a fun one.

On the last bombraid of WW2, one aircraft lost not just one, but two engines (both inboard). After dropping its load on a secondary target, it made a precarious landing at Iwo Jima. What were the names (given by the crew) of the two engines that did NOT fail? BONUS: What did the radioman sport (that no one else had) on his crew?

* _54th_Speeder *

SithSpeeder
03-01-2007, 07:07 PM
Hint #1: S/N 44-69814 (this is a really good story, btw).

* _54th_Speeder *

harryklein66
03-01-2007, 08:26 PM
I think the answer is here : http://www.greatwhitefleet.org/indiana/indy/others/cityof/cityofin.htm
http://www.rootsweb.com/%7Eny330bg/crews458.htm#802
I admit I wouldn't have found without the serial http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I've find this story also interesting :http://home.netcom.com/~jb29miss/b29.htm (http://home.netcom.com/%7Ejb29miss/b29.htm)

SithSpeeder
03-01-2007, 08:57 PM
(still insisting on an answer to the question http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/mockface.gif , but you have found the right place http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif )

And yes, I had heard/just learned about (in the last year) the last bomb raid after the atom bombs. I'll let on later exactly how and why http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

BEGIN EDIT: OK, no takers, eh?
The number one engine was named Dusty by the ground crew chief. The number four engine was a trick question http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif, as you would have had to seen a pic or known someone from the crew...it turns out I have both http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif .

http://www.simace.com/_images/B29_Indianapolis_Engine4_Stan_Cach_FO_Radar.JPG
So engine 4 was named "Annie" by Stan Cach. Annie didn't write for 2 years, but he ended up marrying her once getting out of the service and they had four wonderful sons.

The answer to the BONUS question is the skull and cross bones tattooed on Staff Sergeant Don Masterson's left arm. Turns out he is my neighbor http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/halo.gif and we took the following picture just hours ago!
http://www.simace.com/_images/Don_Masterson_SSGT_RO.jpg

Don not only served in WW2, but also Korea. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif He's the guy in the lower left corner if you follow the link Harry posted: http://www.rootsweb.com/%7Eny330bg/crews458.htm#802

So, to you, HarryKlein66!
...END EDIT

* _54th_Speeder *

harryklein66
03-02-2007, 07:40 AM
(still insisting on an answer to the question , but you have found the right place )

Yes sorry about that, it was 4 am when I posted, I was a bit tired http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/sleepzzz.gif

harryklein66
03-03-2007, 11:58 AM
On 20 May 1945 a lonely Raiden attacked a flight of 75 P-51, shoot down one, and manage to escape.
Who was the Pilot of this Raiden ?

R_Target
03-03-2007, 12:21 PM
Sadaaki Akamatsu, the "Raiden Master."

harryklein66
03-03-2007, 01:03 PM
Yes http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif http://www.cieldegloire.com/010_akamatsu_s.php

It's your turn Ronnco

R_Target
03-03-2007, 01:54 PM
O.K., easy one. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Operation Overlord was not the only amphibious landing in June 1944. Within days, there was another operation with nearly the same amount of troops that the U.S. commited to Normandy. What was the name of this operation and where did it take place?

leitmotiv
03-03-2007, 06:23 PM
Operation Forager, the invasion of Saipan in Marianas---the famed "Marianas Turkey Shoot."

R_Target
03-03-2007, 07:18 PM
Correct-a-mundo!

http://www.genuinevc.com/archives/180px-Fonzie.jpg

LEBillfish
03-03-2007, 08:15 PM
<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">***Remember guys, try and give references where you got the answers so others can look be it a book, website, whatever. Add pics of maps, or anything applicable...and lastly,

The question poster though most know should still state "who" got it correct and hand it off, also adding their references and additional info.</span>

Point of the thread is learning, trivia the inspiration to more investigation and discovering even more http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

leitmotiv
03-03-2007, 09:51 PM
See the Marianas volume from the fifteen-volume HISTORY OF UNITED STATES NAVAL OPERATIONS IN WWII, which will be in any good library in the United States, for information on Operation Forager.

What was the last mission of the G4M "Betty" in WWII?

Sharpe26
03-04-2007, 01:20 AM
Not to sure about this, but one of the last missions of the Betty would have been transporting members of the Japanese delegation to sign the surrender at Singapore or a place somewhere in that neighbourhood.

leitmotiv
03-04-2007, 02:08 AM
Well, is this a positive answer or a rumination?!

SithSpeeder
03-04-2007, 11:18 PM
It's a positive answer...and he meant to say Ie Shima, Ryukyu Islands (if you re-arrange all the letters, it spells "Singapore" http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif ).

* _54th_Speeder *

leitmotiv
03-04-2007, 11:34 PM
It's not a positive answer, but I have work to do so I'll hand it to Sith Speeder who is positive!

SithSpeeder
03-05-2007, 10:23 AM
(LOL at leitmotiv...)

The thing I found interesting in looking more closely at the Betty was her range...3,749 mile range (1941).

OK, I was hoping Sharpe would jump back in to help keep thread participation up.

But here goes (fairly easy one):
What production Japanese aircraft had the largest bomb payload?

Extra Credit: What Japanese aircraft had the largest bomb payload (during the WW2 years)?

* _54th_Speeder *

harryklein66
03-05-2007, 10:56 AM
That would be the H8K with 8x250kg 2000kg

and for the extra edit, the G8N Renzan with 4000kg

nice Rita picutres here http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif : http://www.ijnafphotos.com/jbwg8n1.htm

SithSpeeder
03-05-2007, 11:41 AM
HK FTW! The H8K was a fantastic plane, perhaps one of the best seaplanes of the war (if not THE best). See: http://www.combinedfleet.com/ijna/h8k.htm for more details.

Yours!

* _54th_Speeder *

harryklein66
03-06-2007, 01:08 PM
In November 1941 the evaluation squad of the
Ki-44 became the 47th dokuritsu chutai.
At what does the 47 number refers to ?

SithSpeeder
03-08-2007, 08:02 AM
Guessing here...47th Independent Air Company ("Kawasemi Buntai", Kingfisher Unit) was the name of the experimental unit (although I can't find any reference tying the two, hence the WAG).

* _54th_Speeder *

harryklein66
03-08-2007, 09:20 AM
Ok, I give a tips, the unit emblem (posted on page 1 , the first on the left labeled : <span class="ev_code_RED">Ronin</span> device ) and the number <span class="ev_code_RED">47</span> refers to the same event. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

SithSpeeder
03-08-2007, 02:21 PM
Ok, ok...needed the hint. It comes from the story of 47 Ronin (wandering/leaderless Samurai) or the 47 Samurai or the Ako Vendetta.

This is the prototypical Japanese story of samurai loyalty, duty, and honor dating back to the late 1600s that over time, became the stuff of legend.
For a six paragraph description, see: http://www.samurai-archives.com/ronin.html

HK--how did you learn of the connection between the Ki-44 squadron and the 47 Ronin? I still haven't found proof of a source that it wasn't more than happenstance.

* _54th_Speeder *

harryklein66
03-08-2007, 03:40 PM
Yes you are correct http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

in fact, from what I know the emblem of the unit(a drum ) is the Yamaga clan emblem , they talk about him in the link you've pointed, so the link with the number 47 seems abvious.

If you look closely , there is a lot of reference to the ancient history in the japanese armies of that time, some are obvious, like the samoura´ sword, or Kamikaze (but they use also a different word which means the same, but I can't remember ), some are less obvious like the number 47, or the stylized Kikusui which appeared on various form on japanese tank,ship, or aircraft.
I find it interesting to look for those kind of detail, because I think it help to understand the sate of mind better.
look for the history of Okinawa (not WWII but before )for exemple, it's very instructive.
Ouhla I talk too much. ^^

So it's your turn to ask a question http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

SithSpeeder
03-08-2007, 04:42 PM
I find it interesting to look for those kind of detail, because I think it help to understand the sate of mind better.
look for the history of Okinawa (not WWII but before )for exemple,... Cool, HK. I don't know much about Japanese history, so I find this kind of stuff pretty interesting.

Next question (kinda easy):
The Allied B-24 Liberator and the B-29 Superfortress flew had published ceiling values of 28,000 ft and 31,850 ft. What Japanese WW2 production plane had the highest ceiling?

BONUS: What non-production (i.e. prototype) Japanese WW2 plane had the highest ceiling?

* _54th_Speeder *

SithSpeeder
03-13-2007, 10:06 AM
Experten bonus question...what was the last plane to be shot down minutes before the end of the war?

* _54th_Speeder *
(who is applying a bit of the dark arts in resurrecting this thread)