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View Full Version : Ever wonder were the Ki's went?



VBF-83_Hawk
12-24-2004, 11:52 PM
There seems to be a lot of disagreement about what was where during the Okinawa invasion. F4U-4 this, Ki-84 that, P-47 this, Ki-100 that....bla blah blah. Why this plane flew this way, and that plane the other. The Ki-84 was the best fighter during Okinawa. It could out fly anything and was faster than the P-51. The problem was how it was used, when and why....along with the mechanical problems that haunted it.

The Japs were not stupid and the invasion of Okinawa was a masive ambush that went very sour!

While Task Force 52 made its way around the east side of Okinawa, Task Force 58 was making attacks on the Japanese Homeland area of Kyushu. Planes were hitting airfields and factories. This was to softewn up any air attacks from there. Most if not all IJ planes were removed from Okinawa in this preperation. Task Force 58 continued to proceed to the east side of the Okinawa island chain. The British were patroling the west side. We are talking 300 miles each side of the chain. Kyushu to the north east and Formosa to the south west.

The Japs werent stupid and knew they were comming and were they would invade. Here was thier plan of defense.

1. Kamikazi Task Force 58 carriers moving south from Kyushu in late March with expendable planes.

2. Kamikazi Task Force 52 with the Yamoto, eight escorts, 600+ small wooden boats powered by 80 hp CHEVY engines, and mini-subs AFTER ALLIED troops were well inland early April. This was to cut off the troops from a retreat.

3. Finish off whats left with the Ki-84, 100s etc

I think around 11 April eleven Ki-84s attacked Yonton and Kadena airfields, nine were shot down and one ditched by Kyushu. They were fast. Nothing could catch them, or out run them. The problem was that they were used for ground attcks and the AAA cought them. One F4U pilot radioed, "You can come up now, I have 1 Ki-84 and 2 zekes cornerd....that was the last herd from the F4U! Compared to the allied aircraft numbers, The Ki's were only a few. Most stayed in Japan to intercept the B-29s....homeland defense as well as the J2Ms, Ki-44s. N1K2Js were expendable.

Ack on Okinawa was almost non-existant except for the Naha area early on.

AAA from the Yamoto was very inaccurate and out of 400 allied planes that attacked it, only 10 were lost as well as 12 crew.


If if if if , we had gone much further than Kyushu, the allies probably would have gotten thier butts kicked by these planes.

So, where they at Okinawa?...sure but about as much as the P-47s were!

VBF-83_Hawk
12-24-2004, 11:52 PM
There seems to be a lot of disagreement about what was where during the Okinawa invasion. F4U-4 this, Ki-84 that, P-47 this, Ki-100 that....bla blah blah. Why this plane flew this way, and that plane the other. The Ki-84 was the best fighter during Okinawa. It could out fly anything and was faster than the P-51. The problem was how it was used, when and why....along with the mechanical problems that haunted it.

The Japs were not stupid and the invasion of Okinawa was a masive ambush that went very sour!

While Task Force 52 made its way around the east side of Okinawa, Task Force 58 was making attacks on the Japanese Homeland area of Kyushu. Planes were hitting airfields and factories. This was to softewn up any air attacks from there. Most if not all IJ planes were removed from Okinawa in this preperation. Task Force 58 continued to proceed to the east side of the Okinawa island chain. The British were patroling the west side. We are talking 300 miles each side of the chain. Kyushu to the north east and Formosa to the south west.

The Japs werent stupid and knew they were comming and were they would invade. Here was thier plan of defense.

1. Kamikazi Task Force 58 carriers moving south from Kyushu in late March with expendable planes.

2. Kamikazi Task Force 52 with the Yamoto, eight escorts, 600+ small wooden boats powered by 80 hp CHEVY engines, and mini-subs AFTER ALLIED troops were well inland early April. This was to cut off the troops from a retreat.

3. Finish off whats left with the Ki-84, 100s etc

I think around 11 April eleven Ki-84s attacked Yonton and Kadena airfields, nine were shot down and one ditched by Kyushu. They were fast. Nothing could catch them, or out run them. The problem was that they were used for ground attcks and the AAA cought them. One F4U pilot radioed, "You can come up now, I have 1 Ki-84 and 2 zekes cornerd....that was the last herd from the F4U! Compared to the allied aircraft numbers, The Ki's were only a few. Most stayed in Japan to intercept the B-29s....homeland defense as well as the J2Ms, Ki-44s. N1K2Js were expendable.

Ack on Okinawa was almost non-existant except for the Naha area early on.

AAA from the Yamoto was very inaccurate and out of 400 allied planes that attacked it, only 10 were lost as well as 12 crew.


If if if if , we had gone much further than Kyushu, the allies probably would have gotten thier butts kicked by these planes.

So, where they at Okinawa?...sure but about as much as the P-47s were!

fordfan25
12-25-2004, 12:09 AM
i thought i read the -4 was a faster than the ki84? ill have to look that up again.

3.JG51_BigBear
12-25-2004, 12:13 AM
By the end of the war, a majority of the Japanese aircraft being produced were put in reserve, many hidden in mountain side hangers, awaiting the final defense of the home island. It is estimated by some that this force was as large as the Japanese air forces already in combat. Although it would have been hard pressed to mount defensive sorties against the massive wave of Allied troops and bombers that were sure to come with an invasion of Japan, they would still have been a force to be rekoned with. I would imagine it was also very difficult to move the latest aircraft to the front and to keep them fully serviced. Many times there just weren't enough parts, fuel, or pilots to fly the planes and they remained grounded. The Luftwaffe ran into many of the same problems at the end of the war. Although its aircraft were still very advanced they lacked parts, fuel, and experienced pilots. They also found there high altitude aircraft, such as the 190D and the 109K, relegated to ground attack work and low altitude anti-fighter bomber sweeps because it was almost impossible for their front line fighter units to reach an altitude where they would have done any good against heavy bombers and their fighter escorts.

One other thing to consider is pilot quality. Although many skilled Japanese pilots still remained in the Japanese airforce and navy, they were a shrinking minority. Although American pilots did not see as much combat during a tour of duty as their axis counter-parts may have, by 1944-45 they were all going through full training programs and were much more competant on the average than their Japanese opposition. Even if the Japanes pilot was equiped with a KI-84 in perfect working order (which I'm sure was a rarity), his American opposition was likely to be more skilled and show up in greater numbers.

I think by this point there was little to be done.

VBF-83_Hawk
12-25-2004, 12:25 AM
suposidly the F4U-4 was 22 mph faster. But I think that (427mph) was with a newly overhauled engine, airframe and high octain American av gas! From what I read, the later the war, the worse they got but could still perform at 30k!!!

Remember these bozos had to fly 600 mile round trip from Kyushu. Kinda scary with the poor engines they had among other reliability issues.