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View Full Version : Isn't it illegal to lie about the content of a video game?



Rakudaton
01-30-2011, 10:20 AM
I'm specifically talking about the idea of a "personal assassin", which was mentioned in an interview before the release of Brotherhood. It was supposed to be like a protege that Ezio could select from amongst his assassins, and he/she would become like your sidekick. This content was in no way included in the game, and a number of fans (myself included) were disappointed to be let down like this.

Isn't this illegal? Surely it's misrepresentation?

If a car dealer claimed that their car had an inbuilt sat-nav feature and didn't, I'm pretty sure that's fraud. Now, you might say that that's because it's a physical thing rather than software. Well, what if an anti-virus package was advertised as having a feature whereby it could fix certain issues with your computer, but in fact only scanned? That's fraud as well, surely.

Why is it different for video games?


(N.B. I think Ubisoft did a brilliant job with AC:B, and pretty much made up for this one oversight. But I'm just curious as to how the law sits on this one.)

itsamea-mario
01-30-2011, 10:30 AM
They never said what it would do, they never even gave a description of what the personal assassin is.

I think it was Claudia anyway.

Mr_Shade
01-30-2011, 10:34 AM
Hi There,

All video game content can be subject to change before release.

Ideas and expected gameplay - which can sometimes be previewed in dev videos - can sometimes alter during the games development cycle - in fact certain games have been released with major parts of levels removed at the last second, or even not appear at all - though I'm not using it as an excuse.

If you can find the video you mention and post me a link to it?, I can then ask the team what was meant by it - there may be some misunderstanding over the purpose of this feature.



As ever though, should you feel the need to write a letter of complaint, details of your regional Ubisoft Head Office will be in your game's manual or available online at www.ubi.com (http://www.ubi.com)

ThaWhistle
01-30-2011, 10:34 AM
thats such a vague an undescriptive thing that it has no real meaning. it comes down to semantics, and what they talked about didn't reflect the final state of the game.

TorQue1988
01-30-2011, 10:36 AM
well i don't know about the legal stuff...i also was disappointed that wasn't in the game but i don't remember that interview,and besides if that was an early announcement while the game was in the making then it's not actually relevant because in many games things change from the moment of the announcement and the moment of the release date....if that announcement would have been made after the game was finished or it would have been mentioned in the manual or on the disk case than that would be a problem;i don't think it is misrepresentation because the developers usually take things out of the game for many reasons(like lack of time or memory limitations and stuff like that)...so what they say in pre-production interviews isn't relevant...anyway i hope they will include that in the singleplayer DLC.

Requiscent
01-30-2011, 10:39 AM
I always assumed the personal assassin was your very first one. Usually represented by one Arrow.

Rakudaton
01-30-2011, 11:39 AM
Originally posted by Mr_Shade:
Hi There,

All video game content can be subject to change before release.

Ideas and expected gameplay - which can sometimes be previewed in dev videos - can sometimes alter during the games development cycle - in fact certain games have been released with major parts of levels removed at the last second, or even not appear at all - though I'm not using it as an excuse.

If you can find the video you mention and post me a link to it?, I can then ask the team what was meant by it - there may be some misunderstanding over the purpose of this feature.



As ever though, should you feel the need to write a letter of complaint, details of your regional Ubisoft Head Office will be in your game's manual or available online at www.ubi.com (http://www.ubi.com)

Oh, thanks. I don't want to make a complaint, though -- the game is absolutely brilliant. I was just wondering about the legal side of things. When you put it like that, though, it sounds fair enough -- I suppose it's inevitable that minor things will be changed or left out, sometimes major things.

As for the interview itself, I don't think it was a video -- it was a transcript relayed by some game review/preview site. So even then it's possible that they simply misinterpreted what the interviewee was saying, or read too much into the assassin recruit system.

I didn't really want to cause a fuss. I'm just curious about these things.

(Actually, my thread title seems a bit agressive. That wasn't my intention. Mi dispiace, amici.)

Mr_Shade
01-30-2011, 11:43 AM
Not a problem http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Abeonis
01-31-2011, 08:48 AM
Oh, if only it was misrepresentation to say something in a Dev video and it not be in the final product. Molyneux's Lionhead would be screwed...

Also, if it had said "Control your own personal assassin" on the game box, and nothing of the sort was actually in-game, then that would be illegal, but as Mr. Shade said, everything in Dev videos is subject to change.

Mutley_Rulz
01-31-2011, 04:59 PM
If it was illegal I think Lucasarts would be dead and buried after the mass overhype on TFU II.
Some content is bound to be removed before the end process, if it pleases you just pick one of your recruits and call them your 'favourite'.

edzilla_551
01-31-2011, 05:15 PM
Originally posted by Rakudaton:
I'm specifically talking about the idea of a "personal assassin", which was mentioned in an interview before the release of Brotherhood. It was supposed to be like a protege that Ezio could select from amongst his assassins, and he/she would become like your sidekick. This content was in no way included in the game, and a number of fans (myself included) were disappointed to be let down like this.

Isn't this illegal? Surely it's misrepresentation?

If a car dealer claimed that their car had an inbuilt sat-nav feature and didn't, I'm pretty sure that's fraud. Now, you might say that that's because it's a physical thing rather than software. Well, what if an anti-virus package was advertised as having a feature whereby it could fix certain issues with your computer, but in fact only scanned? That's fraud as well, surely.

Why is it different for video games?


(N.B. I think Ubisoft did a brilliant job with AC:B, and pretty much made up for this one oversight. But I'm just curious as to how the law sits on this one.)


why do you want sue ubisoft, so they lose all their money and make no more games http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/disagree.gif