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pettera
04-13-2004, 04:31 AM
Dear all

Can anybody enlighten me on the differences between the four Spitfire versions in AEP? What is the difference in handling and what does the clipped wing contribute? Finally, what is the appropriate tactics deployed by these planes? I usually fall into spin to close to the deck and find myself eating dust after a failed turnfight. Also, some tips on flaps and radiator settings are welcome.

Petter

Petter

pettera
04-13-2004, 04:31 AM
Dear all

Can anybody enlighten me on the differences between the four Spitfire versions in AEP? What is the difference in handling and what does the clipped wing contribute? Finally, what is the appropriate tactics deployed by these planes? I usually fall into spin to close to the deck and find myself eating dust after a failed turnfight. Also, some tips on flaps and radiator settings are welcome.

Petter

Petter

Sam_the_greek
04-13-2004, 05:15 AM
There's not so much difference. More HP probably. The clipped wings are supposed to turn better and have a better role rate, but I don't fly them. I'm flying the 1941 version in the Kuban '43 campaign.

leadbaloon
04-13-2004, 05:17 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by pettera:
Dear all

Can anybody enlighten me on the differences between the four Spitfire versions in AEP? What is the difference in handling and what does the clipped wing contribute? Finally, what is the appropriate tactics deployed by these planes? I usually fall into spin to close to the deck and find myself eating dust after a failed turnfight. Also, some tips on flaps and radiator settings are welcome.

Petter

Petter<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The clipped wing is to improve the roll rate and the overall performance at low altitude, but carries less ammo and suffers once you start getting higher.

The LF version has a different engine (not sure exactly, just a more up to date Merlin I think).

Spitfires (like the Hurricane) only have one flap setting, which is down and there's a little sign on the dash saying not to lower at speeds over 140 mph, so I don't.

I only use the radiator fully open or closed. There are five stops, so I do 2,4,6,8,open, after take off, then it's just one stop to close it as soon as you engage in combat, when I break off or if the temperature gauge starts getting too high 2,4,6,8,open again.

Nub_322Sqn
04-13-2004, 05:33 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Sam_the_greek:
There's not so much difference. More HP probably. The clipped wings are supposed to turn better and have a better role rate, but I don't fly them. I'm flying the 1941 version in the Kuban '43 campaign.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The clipped wing Spitfires don't turn better, the wing clipping was done for a better roll rate and they where slightly faster because of the clipped wings.

The round wing Spitfires turn better then the clipped wings because they had a larger wing surface.

This is the way it should be however but I haven't tested it in game yet.

The main difference with the Spitfires in IL2 are between the "regular" ones and the L.F. ones are the performance at low and mid altitude.

The L.F. Spitfires obtain better results in speed and climb at low and mid altitude and the "regular" Spitfires obtain better results at high altitude.

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x6BL_Brando
04-13-2004, 10:31 AM
Here's a few quotes from 'The Spitfire Story" by Alfred Price

"While the Spitfire was being improved in various ways, the Germans were also introducing improved fighters. During the early months of 1942 it gradually became clear that the Spitfire V was in many respects outclassed by the Focke-Wulf 190 which had just entered service in the Luftwaffe." ....

Luckily for the Allies......... "In June 1942 an example of the FW190 landed in Britain in error...." Given the chance to stage comparative trials with various Allied a/c it was found that: "the FW 190 could out-run, out-climb, out-dive and out-roll the Spitfire V"

Here he mentions the Merlin 61, 2-stage supercharged engine "which was then being hastened into production" - but also gets to the point of this thread http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

..."there were things that could be done to improve the ability of the V against the 190 particularly at low altitude. One such move was to 'clip' the wings of the Spitfire by removing the detachable tips..... This change ... made a noticeable improvement to rolling performance; it also gave a slight improvement to acceleration, diving performance and speed below 10,000 feet."

As for the other modifications I hope this next passage will explain the question:

"A further improvement in low altitude performance could be gained by fitting the Merlin 50M engine; this was similar to the Mark 45 but, as well as the negative-G carburettor, it had a smaller diameter 'cropped' supercharger impeller which allowed a maximum of +18 pounds boost to be applied at only 5,900 feet and gave a maximum speed of 350 mph at this altitude, about the same as that of the FW 190."

Now we come to the definitive answer:

"The combination of clipped wings and the low altitude rated engines resulted in the Spitfire LF V which became known as the 'clipped and cropped' Spitfire. Less reverently, it was known in some sqadrons as the 'clipped, cropped and clapped Spitty' because the airframes to which these modifications were applied had in many cases seen better days"

I think the last paragraph helps to dispel the myth that all aircraft of a particular model must necessarily perform in exactly the same way just because the specs are the same. It makes me laugh to hear those complaints from people on the lines of " my XXXX won't climb to XXXX feet in XX minutes, this sim is cr-p, blah blah blah".
Listen to Senior Lieutenant (later Colonel) Anatoli Ivanov's feelings on the matter:

"We knew at the time (February 1943) the English had a better fighter, the Spitfire IX, and the word was that it was good. The aircraft our allies had presented to us, however, were of a much older version. Ours had fought against the Germans over the Channel during 1941 and 1942, and these Spitfires had taken some knocks before they were transferred to us."

I guess that any of us who've sortied and then made a forced landing in something resembling a Swiss cheese will have an inkling of the "knocks" the gallant Colonel was talking about!!



"The Spitfire Story" by Alfred Price - ISBN 1 - 85605 - 702 - X

A ripping read http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif with over 350 photographs, line art-work and more detail than you can cope with!!

&lt;S&gt;