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View Full Version : Did the He-162 Salamander see real combat?



Mitlov47
03-16-2004, 07:33 PM
Is it a jet-powered aircraft that was actually flown significantly in WWII, like the Me-262, or is it a fantasy plane, like the Go-229 and BF-109Z? Just curious.

It's kinda cool. I finally mastered how to fly the German jets without spontaneously igniting, and this is by far my favorite (I also prefer it to the YP-80 and the two rocket-powered aircraft).

---------------------------

(aka Mitlov on HyperLobby and Ubi)

P-38J -- "A Sorta Fairytale"
P-63C -- "Jackie's Strength"

Mitlov47
03-16-2004, 07:33 PM
Is it a jet-powered aircraft that was actually flown significantly in WWII, like the Me-262, or is it a fantasy plane, like the Go-229 and BF-109Z? Just curious.

It's kinda cool. I finally mastered how to fly the German jets without spontaneously igniting, and this is by far my favorite (I also prefer it to the YP-80 and the two rocket-powered aircraft).

---------------------------

(aka Mitlov on HyperLobby and Ubi)

P-38J -- "A Sorta Fairytale"
P-63C -- "Jackie's Strength"

mike_espo
03-16-2004, 07:48 PM
Some were flown operationally, never saw combat.

InyerEye
03-16-2004, 07:50 PM
It did see some combat action.
Do a search on the internet and you will find some info.
I read somwhere that at least one group of Hitlers Youth flew them,but the combat records had been lost.
http://www.faqs.org/docs/air/avhe162.html#m3
http://www.btinternet.com/~lee_mail/Fw190-5.jpg

necrobaron
03-16-2004, 07:52 PM
There were reports that one shot down either a Tempest or Typhoon,but these reports were left unsubstantiated. I believe there were also rumors that they also encountered Russian birds on the Eastern Front.

"Not all who wander are lost."

herzam
03-16-2004, 08:16 PM
some missions whit JG1

mike_espo
03-16-2004, 08:29 PM
I read that it was made of non-strategic materials and in flight it could actually become unglued and fall apart. I heard this is what happened in some cases.

Menthol_moose
03-16-2004, 08:33 PM
heard it reached units but didnt fly from lack of jetfuel.

http://www.ljuhome.com/images/own3d/owned-granny.gif

Mr0blongo
03-16-2004, 08:51 PM
HE-162 Salamander in Action

The first Luftwaffe unit to fly the He-162 was an evaluation unit named "Erprobungskommando 162", formed at the Luftwaffe test center at Rechlin under the command of Oberstleutnant Heinz Baer, a respected combat pilot who was credited with 200 kills.

46 He-162s were delivered to the Luftwaffe in February, allowing Baer's unit to acquire familiarity with the type. That month also saw deliveries of the He-162 to its first operational unit, the "Ist Gruppe / Jagdgeschwader 1 (I/JG-1)", which had previously flown the Focke-Wulf FW-190.

I/JG-1 was pulled back to Parchim, not far from the Heinkel factory at Marienhe, where the Luftwaffe pilots could pick up their new jets. They began intensive training on the type in March, but by that time the Third Reich was obviously on the threshold of collapse and transportation and fuel supply was grinding to a halt under the pressure of Allied air attacks.

On 7 April, the USAAF bombed the field at Parchim with 134 B-17 Flying Fortresses. Two days later, I/JG-1 left their demolished facilities to move to a nearby airfield at Ludwigslust. Less than a week later they moved again, flying north to an airfield at Leck, in Schleswig-Holstein, near the Danish border. In the meantime, II Gruppe of JG-1 had moved to the Heinkel airfield at Marienhe to begin trading their FW-190s for He-162s.

* The He-162 finally began to see combat in mid-April. On 19 April, the pilot of a British Royal Air Force (RAF) fighter who had been captured by the Germans informed his interrogators that he had been shot down by a jet fighter whose description was clearly that of a He-162. The Heinkel and its pilot were lost as well, shot down by an RAF Tempest fighter while returning to base.

On 20 April, a Luftwaffe pilot successfully ejected from a He-162, though the reason for the hasty exit from his aircraft was not recorded. One possibility is that he simply ran out of fuel. The He-162's half-hour endurance was simply not enough, and at least two of JG-1's pilots were killed making "dead-stick" landings after exhausting their fuel.

On 4 May, all of JG-1's surviving He-162s were formed into a special consolidated "Einsatzgruppen (Special Action Group)", but this action amounted to little more than "rearranging the deck chairs on the TITANIC". On 5 May, the Germans agreed to a cease-fire and the He-162s were all grounded.

From mid-April, I/JG-1 had scored a number of kills, but had also lost thirteen He-162s and ten pilots. Most of the losses were from flying accidents, due to problems such as engine flame-outs and occasional structural failures. The difficulties with the type seem to have been due to the fact that it was rushed into production, not that it was an inherently bad design. One experienced Luftwaffe pilot who flew it called it a "first-class combat aircraft".

Erprobungskommando 162 fighters, which had been passed on to an operational unit under Adolf Galland a few weeks earlier, were all destroyed by their crews to keep the jets from falling into Allied hands. However, JG-1 cooperatively turned their He-162s over to the Allies, and examples of the fighter were then flown in the US, Britain, France, and the USSR.

One British pilot who evaluated the He-162 also praised it, though a second British pilot was killed in November 1945 during an air display at Farnborough. One of the tailfins broke off, sending the fighter into the ground.

* The design had some clear weaknesses, of course, such as its short endurance and the fact that the position of the engine left the pilot almost completely blind to the vital rear "six" position. Some sources also state that the back-mounted engine made the aircraft logitudinally unstable, rendering any maneuvers that "threw the aircraft around" unsafe.

However, in one sense the He-162 was remarkable: it was designed and flown in three months, and in the five months following several hundred were built under the most difficult conditions. It was fortunate for the Allies that the He-162 was much too late to be anything more than a footnote to the history of the air war over Europe, but a certain curiosity remains over what it might have been able to do had events been more favorable to it.

A handful of Volksjaegers still exist as static displays in museums around the world. None remain flying. Given that the lack of hardened alloys meant that German jet engines sometimes had to be scrapped after as little as ten hours of flight operations, it is unlikely one of the original He-162s will ever fly again

DangerForward
03-16-2004, 10:47 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by EMitton:
Is it a jet-powered aircraft that was actually flown significantly in WWII, like the Me-262, or is it a fantasy plane, like the Go-229 and BF-109Z? Just curious.

It's kinda cool. I finally mastered how to fly the German jets without spontaneously igniting, and this is by far my favorite (I also prefer it to the YP-80 and the two rocket-powered aircraft).

---------------------------

(aka Mitlov on HyperLobby and Ubi)

P-38J -- "A Sorta Fairytale"
P-63C -- "Jackie's Strength"<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

In Adolph Dickfeld's autobiography he talks about flying the 162 in combat, not with much success though given the difficult odds. I'd read in another book that one or two victory claims were filed for 162 pilots, but were never verified during the chaos of the final days of the war. That's what I remember.

DangerForward

CH_D-Fender
03-17-2004, 05:44 AM
In the chaos of the last weeks of the war a lot
of things happend which were never officialy recorded.

There are records of ground troops near Vienna,
which fought the russians, that have seen He-162
in action.

There are speculations, that the He-162 used
near Vienna were produced and or assemled
nearby and an "ad hoc special commando" put
the planes into immediate service.

As I said before: no official records, only
eye witnesses.

D-Fender

p1ngu666
03-17-2004, 06:52 AM
in the janes book im reading, theres a pilot account, says he got 2 jugs
perhaps ill scan it http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

http://www.pingu666.modded.me.uk/mysig3.jpg

Zyzbot
03-17-2004, 07:06 AM
I have heard of that one too. Another source I read once says the two P-47's were actually mis-identified Temepests.Who knows?

Storm_Bird
03-17-2004, 07:47 AM
He-162 had put into the battlefield in WWII.

http://www.faqs.org/docs/air/avhe162.html

http://http://www.52dby.com/non-cgi/usr/16/16_931_1.jpg

BlitzPig_Ritter
03-17-2004, 07:53 AM
Great read Mr0blongo, thanks for posting that.

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Afreaka
03-17-2004, 07:59 AM
Salamanders can't fly but they are sweet. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif
http://www.detroitzoo.org/newzoo/common/salamander.jpg

Rex Kramer(Airplane, 1980): Do you know what it's like to fall in the mud and get kicked... in the head... with an iron boot? Of course you don't, no one does. It never happens. It's a dumb question... skip it.

darkhorizon11
03-17-2004, 04:26 PM
Yeah, yet another example of why we were lucky the war ended when it did. I'd hate to think what would've happened if it was released per say... at the time of the landings and Normandy....